References of "Fauconnier, Marie-Laure"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRoot-emitted volatile organic compounds: can they mediate belowground plant-plant interactions?
Delory, Benjamin ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Plant and Soil (2016), 402

Background Aboveground, plants release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that act as chemical signals between neighbouring plants. It is now well documented that VOCs emitted by the roots in the plant ... [more ▼]

Background Aboveground, plants release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that act as chemical signals between neighbouring plants. It is now well documented that VOCs emitted by the roots in the plant rhizosphere also play important ecological roles in the soil ecosystem, notably in plant defence because they are involved in interactions between plants, phytophagous pests and organisms of the third trophic level. The roles played by root-emitted VOCs in between- and within-plant signalling, however, are still poorly documented in the scientific literature. Scope Given that (1) plants release volatile cues mediating plant-plant interactions aboveground, (2) roots can detect the chemical signals originating from their neighbours, and (3) roots release VOCs involved in biotic interactions belowground, the aim of this paper is to discuss the roles of VOCs in between- and within-plant signalling belowground. We also highlight the technical challenges associated with the analysis of root-emitted VOCs and the design of experiments targeting volatile-mediated root-root interactions. Conclusions We conclude that root-root interactions mediated by volatile cues deserve more research attention and that both the analytical tools and methods developed to study the ecological roles played by VOCs in interplant signalling aboveground can be adapted to focus on the roles played by root-emitted VOCs in between- and within-plant signalling. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGrasshoppers as a food source? A review
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016), 20(AgricultureIsLife), 337-352

Description of the subject. Current trends suggest an increasing future demand for conventional meats, which indicates a strong need to shift this dependency to other alternative protein sources such as ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. Current trends suggest an increasing future demand for conventional meats, which indicates a strong need to shift this dependency to other alternative protein sources such as insects. Literature. From a nutritional point of view, of all the insects consumed globally, grasshoppers are particularly important as a human food. Data from the literature regarding the nutrient composition, amino acid profile, fatty acid profile, mineral composition and vitamin content of grasshoppers as reviewed in this paper, suggest that a number of grasshopper species are a good source of nutrients. It also highlights some of the health related aspects that might arise from the consumption of grasshoppers, mostly linked to agricultural practices and the allergic response of sensitive individuals. The paper also summarizes some religious, social and economic factors that are associated with grasshopper consumption. Conclusions. The success of introducing grasshoppers as a novel food in western countries depends on changes in consumer attitudes. It would be interesting to develop food products derived from grasshoppers in a form acceptable to consumers. Furthermore, it is important to explore the food potential of some grasshopper species native to western countries and to develop their rearing methodologies to enhance availability. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (29 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of the allelopathic potential of water-soluble compounds of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. subsp. vulgare) and great brome (Bromus diandrus Roth.) using a modified bioassay
Bouhaouel, Imen ULg; Gfeller, Aurélie; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016), 20(4), 482-494

Description of the subject. The present study focuses on the description of the allelopathic interactions between wild and crop species that may occur in a given ecosystem. Objectives. The objective is ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. The present study focuses on the description of the allelopathic interactions between wild and crop species that may occur in a given ecosystem. Objectives. The objective is the evaluation of the allo- and autoinhibition activity of root exudates of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. subsp. vulgare) and great brome (Bromus diandrus Roth.) seedlings by water-soluble allelochemicals. Method. The allelopathic activities of five Tunisian barley genotypes (modern varieties and landraces), one Saudi Arabian barley landrace and great brome were assessed using a modified laboratory bioassay named “seedling-after-seedling agar method”. Results. The barley or the great brome reduced, to a greater extent, the root growth compared to the shoot growth of receiver species. The response of the root system architecture of the great brome towards barley root exudates was studied in detail. All the measured root traits were highly sensitive to the presence of barley. In our conditions, the allelopathic activity of barley root exudates had no apparent relationship with the size of the root and a prominent action of genetic determinants in the allelopathic potential between genotypes is proposed. The alloinhibitory activity of barley or great brome root exudates deferred between the receiver species but was always higher than the autoinhibition potential. The autoinhibition in barley proved to depend on whether the genotypes used as donor and receiver are identical or different, suggesting a specific interaction of allelochemicals with the receiver plant. These molecules seem to be the main actors in the allelopathic barley potential as external factors such variations of pH have no evident relevance in the inhibition process. Conclusions. Barley and great brome exude molecules in their surroundings. This affects the growth of the receiver plants, suggesting that these compounds might contribute to the plant community dynamics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of sun-drying on physicochemical characteristics, phenolic composition and in vitro antioxidant activity of dark fig varieties
Bachir Bey, Mostapha; Richard, Gaetan ULg; Meziant, Leila et al

in Journal of Food Processing & Preservation (2016)

The aim of this investigation was to study the effects of sun-drying on some physicochemical parameters, phenolic profiles, and antioxidant activities of three dark fig varieties. Sun-drying led to a ... [more ▼]

The aim of this investigation was to study the effects of sun-drying on some physicochemical parameters, phenolic profiles, and antioxidant activities of three dark fig varieties. Sun-drying led to a decrease of weight and moisture content, an increase of sugar content, but not affect acidity. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of 22 phenolic compounds (14 phenolic acids and 8 flavonoids), including eight compounds that were detected for the first time. Phenolic acid contents decreased after sun-drying by about 29%, except cinnamic and gallic acids that were increased. Fresh dark fig contained high levels of flavonoids, particularly cyanidin 3-rutinoside and quercetin 3-rutinoside; sun-drying caused decrease in flavonoid contents by about 86%. There are a lot of antioxidant bioactive components besides the phenolic compounds as studied in this work; therefore, the reduction of phenolic compound content by sun-drying could mainly contribute to the reduction of antioxidant activity of the dark figs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIdentification and characterization of volatile organic compounds active against barley pathogens
De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Kaddes, Amine ULg; Fiers, Marie et al

in Bulletin OILB/SROP = IOBC/WPRS Bulletin (2016), 117

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA qPCR aptasensor for sensitive detection of aflatoxin M1
Guo, Xiaodong; Wen, Fang; Zheng, Nan et al

in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (2016), 408(20), 55775584

Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), one of the most toxic mycotoxins, imposes serious health hazards. AFM1 had previously been classified as a group 2B carcinogen1 and has been classified as a group 1 carcinogen by the ... [more ▼]

Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), one of the most toxic mycotoxins, imposes serious health hazards. AFM1 had previously been classified as a group 2B carcinogen1 and has been classified as a group 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) of the World Health Organization (WHO).2 Determination of AFM1 thus plays an important role for quality control of food safety. In this work, a sensitive and reliable aptasensor was developed for the detection of AFM1. The immobilization of aptamer through a strong interaction with biotin–streptavidin was used as a molecular recognition element, and its complementary ssDNA was employed as the template for a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) amplification. Under optimized assay conditions, a linear relationship (ranging from 1.0×10-4 to 1.0 µg L-1) was achieved with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 0.03 ng L-1. In addition, the aptasensor developed here exhibits high selectivity for AFM1 over other mycotoxins and small effects from cross-reaction with structural analogs. The method proposed here has been successfully applied to quantitative determination of AFM1 in infant rice cereal and infant milk powder samples. Results demonstrated that the current approach is potentially useful for food safety analysis, and it could be extended to a large number of targets. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChemical Characterization of Essential Oils of Mints from Senegal
Diop, Serigne Mbacké; Guèye, Momar Talla; Ndiaye, Ibrahima et al

in Natural Product Communications (2016), 11(0), 1-2

Mints from Senegal were extracted separately from fresh (F) and shade-dried (D) plants by steam distillation. Yields were of 0.28 and 0.21% for M. citrata L., 0.21 and 0.18% for M. x piperita L. and 0.10 ... [more ▼]

Mints from Senegal were extracted separately from fresh (F) and shade-dried (D) plants by steam distillation. Yields were of 0.28 and 0.21% for M. citrata L., 0.21 and 0.18% for M. x piperita L. and 0.10 and 0.19% for M. spicata L. in the fresh and dried plants, respectively. GC/FID and GC/MS analysis revealed that many of the major compounds of essential oils decreased with drying. The prominent components of M. citrata oils were linalool that constituted 45.8% (F) and 42.0% (D) and linalyl acetate 42.7 (F) and 38.5% (D). Mentha x piperita was characterized by menthofuran with 30.7% (F) and 28.1% (D), menthol 15.9(F) and 16.4% (D), menthone 13.0 (F) and 14.2% (D), pulegone 17.6%(F) and 13.8%(D) and 1.8-cineole 3.7%(F) and 3.4% (D). Mentha spicata contained mainly carvone 67.8 and 74.7% and limonene 18.1 and 12.5% in the fresh and dried plants respectively. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSalicylic acid differently impacts ethylene and polyamine synthesis in the glycophyte Solanum lycopersicum and the wild-related halophyte Solanum chilense exposed to mild salt stres
Gharbi, Emna; Martinez, Juan Pablo; Benahmed, Hela et al

in Physiologia Plantarum (2016), 171

This study aimed to determine the effects of exogenous application of salicylic acid on the toxic effects of salt in relation to ethylene and polyamine synthesis, and to correlate these traits with the ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to determine the effects of exogenous application of salicylic acid on the toxic effects of salt in relation to ethylene and polyamine synthesis, and to correlate these traits with the expression of genes involved in ethylene and polyamine metabolism in two tomato species differing in their sensitivity to salt stress, Solanum lycopersicum cv Ailsa Craig and its wild salt-resistant relative Solanum chilense. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChemical composition of essential oils and floral waters of Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds. from Senegal
Diop, Serigne Mbacké; Guèye, Momar Talla; Ndiaye, Ibrahima et al

in American Journal of Essential Oils and Natural Products (2016), 4(1), 46-49

Essential oils of Mentha longifolia from Senegal were extracted from fresh plants and dried plants in the shade for 7 days. The yields were of 0.39 and 0.32% in the fresh and dried plants respectively ... [more ▼]

Essential oils of Mentha longifolia from Senegal were extracted from fresh plants and dried plants in the shade for 7 days. The yields were of 0.39 and 0.32% in the fresh and dried plants respectively. Analysis of the essential oils, floral waters and the assay of pulegone were carried out by GC/FID and GC/MS. The major compounds identified in the oils were pulegone (52.0 and 42.4%), menthone (14.3 and 21.2%), 1, 8-cineole (13.1 and 11.4%) and isomenthone (9.0 and 13.2%) in the fresh and dried plants, respectively. Analyses revealed that floral waters were also characterized by the same major compounds as essential oils but at different rates. In these floral waters, pulegone constituted 60.2 and 47.0%, 1,8- cineole 7.9 and 19.6%, isomenthone 7.2 and 10.7%, menthone 6.4 and 9.2%, chrysanthenone 6.4 and 3.2% and α-terpineol 3.0 and 2.7% in the fresh and dried plants, respectively. The assay results of pulegone, a hepatotoxic compound, have shown very high levels (444.6 and 393.3mg/g) in both fresh and dried plants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterization of almond kernel oils of five almonds varieties cultivated in Eastern Morocco
Houmy, Nadia; Mansouri, F.; Benmoumen, A. et al

in Cahiers Options Méditerranéennes (2016)

This study focuses on characterization of almondkernel oils extrated mechanically from five sweet almond varieties (Marcona, Fournat, Ferragnes, Ferraduel and Beldi), cultivated in eastern Morocco. Oil ... [more ▼]

This study focuses on characterization of almondkernel oils extrated mechanically from five sweet almond varieties (Marcona, Fournat, Ferragnes, Ferraduel and Beldi), cultivated in eastern Morocco. Oil content, physicochemical parameters, triacylglycerol and fatty acid compositions were determined. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHepatoprotective and anti-diabetic activities of Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl extracts in animal models: Characterization by HPLC analysis
Medjahed, Zineb; Atmani-Kilani, Dina; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Turkish Journal of Medical Sciences (2016), 46(3), 910-920

Background and aim: The present study was designed to explore anti-diabetic and hepato-protective potentials of Fraxinus angustifolia leaf (FAL) and bark (FAB) extracts in vivo.

Detailed reference viewed: 132 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBarley (Hordeum distichon L.) roots synthesise volatile aldehydes with a strong age-dependent pattern and release (E)- non-2-enal and (E,Z)-nona-2,6-dienal after mechanical injury
Delory, Benjamin M.; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; du Jardin, Patrick ULg et al

in Plant Physiology and Biochemistry (2016), 104

In the context of chemical ecology, the analysis of the temporal production pattern of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in root tissues and the emission rate measurement of root-emitted VOCs are of major ... [more ▼]

In the context of chemical ecology, the analysis of the temporal production pattern of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in root tissues and the emission rate measurement of root-emitted VOCs are of major importance for setting up experiments to study the implication of these compounds in biotic interactions. Such analyses, however, remain challenging because of the belowground location of plant root systems. In this context, this study describes the evolution of the root VOC production pattern of barley (Hordeum distichon L.) at five developmental stages from germination to the end of tillering and evaluates the emission of the identified VOCs in an artificial soil. VOCs produced by crushed root tissues and released by unexcavated root systems were analysed using dynamic sampling devices coupled to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methodology (synchronous SCAN/SIM). The results showed that, at each analysed developmental stage, crushed barley roots produced mainly four volatile aldehydes: hexanal; (E)-hex-2-enal; (E)-non-2-enal; and (E,Z)-nona-2,6-dienal. Higher total and individual VOC concentrations were measured in 3-day-old seminal roots compared with older phenological stages. For each developmental stage, the lipoxygenase (LOX) activity was greater for linoleic acid than α-linolenic acid and the greatest LOX activities using linoleic and α- linolenic acids as substrates were measured in 7- and 3-day-old roots, respectively. The analysis of VOCs released by barley roots into the soil showed that (E)-non-2- enal and (E,Z)-nona-2,6-dienal were the only VOCs emitted in quantifiable amounts by mechanically injured roots. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (13 ULg)
Full Text
See detailVariability in almond oil chemical traits from traditional cultivars from eastern Morocco
Houmy, Nadia; Belhaj, K.; Abid, M. et al

Poster (2015, December 03)

In Morocco, cultivation of almond tree (Prunus amygdalus L.) constitutes the second most important plantation of fruit trees after olive growing. It is mostly cultivated in two regions, « Taza, Al ... [more ▼]

In Morocco, cultivation of almond tree (Prunus amygdalus L.) constitutes the second most important plantation of fruit trees after olive growing. It is mostly cultivated in two regions, « Taza, Al Houceima Taounate » in the north and « Souss Massa Draa » in the south. Almond genetic resources (Marcoma, Fournat, Ferragnes/Ferraduel and Beldi), cultivated in eastern Morocco were studied during two consecutive crop years in order to evaluate variations in kernel oil yield, fatty acid profiles, oleic /linoleic (O/L) ratio and almond oils oxydative stability (OSI,evaluated by rancimat tests) in comparison to monovarietal olive oils. Almond kernel total oil (AO), Oleic acid (C18:1), Linoleic acid (C18:2), O/L-ratio, and tocopherol contents range between: 48 - 62% for kernel total oil; 65- 77.5% for C18:1; 17- 25% for C18:2; 2.5-4 for O/L ratio and 370 - 675 μg/g oil for tocopherols, respectively. We conclude that the genotype is the main variability source for all these chemical traits of AOs. Results obtained from Ferragnes/Ferraduel may be of interest for almond breeding focused to improve kernel oil yield and fatty acid profile. Besides, tocopherols contents of AOs seem to be the most important contributor for their stability to oxidation, even though compared to monovarietal olive oils, stability of AOs were very low and OSI value range between 20-27 hours. This fragility of AOs is due to their high content of unsaturated fatty acid which not allows their use for cooking or storage for long period. However, almond oils could have many applications in the food industry as in cosmetic [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA PHEROMONE TRAP MONITORING SYSTEM FOR THE SADDLE GALL MIDGE, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (DIPTERA: CECIDOMYIIDAE)
Censier, Florence ULg; Heuskin, Stéphanie ULg; SAN MARTIN Y GOMEZ, Gilles et al

in Crop Protection (2015), 80

Outbreaks of saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) have been reported in Belgium and other European countries since 2010. Because of the sporadic nature of this ... [more ▼]

Outbreaks of saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) have been reported in Belgium and other European countries since 2010. Because of the sporadic nature of this pest, which can sometimes be very harmful to cereal crops, an effective monitoring tool is required, both to determine the optimal timing for insecticide applications, and to understand the enigmatic population dynamics of this insect. Following the recent identification of the major sex pheromone component of the saddle gall midge, non-2-yl butanoate, a slow-release dispenser was developed using rubber septa. The release rates of 5 mg and 10 mg-loaded dispensers were initially measured under laboratory conditions, and their effectiveness in terms of pheromone loading and use duration was assessed in the field. The experiments showed that sticky traps baited with 5 mg pheromone-loaded rubber dispensers, renewed every 6 weeks, are suitable for accurately monitoring male H. marginata flights. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (25 ULg)