References of "FOIDART, Jean-Michel"
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See detailMalignant cell attachment to endothelium of ex vivo perfused human umbilical vein. Modulation by platelets, plasma and fibronectin.
Lewalle, J. M.; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Goffinet, G. et al

in Thrombosis Research (1991), 62(4), 287-98

The success of blood-born metastatic spread depends upon a key event: the tumor cell arrest and attachment to the host organ vasculature. In the present study, we have investigated interactions between ... [more ▼]

The success of blood-born metastatic spread depends upon a key event: the tumor cell arrest and attachment to the host organ vasculature. In the present study, we have investigated interactions between several normal and cancer cell lines and vascular endothelium in a model of ex vivo perfusion of human umbilical vein. In this system, hydrodynamic parameters are monitored and endothelial cells are kept in their original environment known to modulate their phenotype. Metastatic tumor cell adhesion to the perfused endothelium was found to be significantly higher than that of normal cells tested. Platelets and soluble plasma factors including fibronectin promoted tumor cell arrest and adhesion to endothelium. Altogether our results indicate that the ex vivo perfusion of human umbilical vein allows the study of the interactions between malignant tumor cells, circulating plasma or blood cells and the endothelium during blood-born metastatic spread. [less ▲]

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See detailArrest of MCF-7 cell migration by laminin in vitro: possible mechanisms.
Coopman, P.; Verhasselt, B.; Bracke, M. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1991), 9(5), 469-84

Laminin, a major basement membrane component, arrested the migration of MCF-7/AZ human breast adenocarcinoma cells that were not invasive in vitro. Migration of invasive MCF-7/6 cells was not affected by ... [more ▼]

Laminin, a major basement membrane component, arrested the migration of MCF-7/AZ human breast adenocarcinoma cells that were not invasive in vitro. Migration of invasive MCF-7/6 cells was not affected by laminin. Both cell types expressed the 67 kD laminin receptor, at both mRNA and protein level, but did not express the alpha 6 subunit of the VLA-6 integrin-type laminin receptor. The presence of YIGSR peptides (100 micrograms/ml), reported to block the interaction between laminin and its 67 kD receptor, did not change the migratory response of MCF-7/AZ or MCF-7/6 cells when meeting laminin lanes. In addition, the migration of these cell types was not affected by the presence of 17-beta-estradiol (10(-6) M) or all-trans retinoic acid (10(-6) M), which were both reported to increase the number of 67 kD receptors. We could therefore not assign an involvement of the 67 kD receptors in migration of MCF-7 cells on laminin, nor did we find evidence that conditioned medium of MCF-7/6 cells contains factors that are able to initiate migration of MCF-7/AZ cells on laminin. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of catechins and citrus flavonoids on invasion in vitro.
Bracke, M.; Vyncke, B.; Opdenakker, G. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1991), 9(1), 13-25

Catechins, a group of flavonoid molecules, inhibit invasion of mouse MO4 cells into embryonic chick heart fragments in vitro. The anti-invasive effects can be ranked as follows: (+)-catechin greater than ... [more ▼]

Catechins, a group of flavonoid molecules, inhibit invasion of mouse MO4 cells into embryonic chick heart fragments in vitro. The anti-invasive effects can be ranked as follows: (+)-catechin greater than (-)-epicatechin greater than 3-O-methyl-(+)-catechin greater than 3-O-palmitoyl-(+)-catechin. Most of the catechins are unstable in cell culture media, and their spontaneous rearrangement products tend to bind to extracellular matrix (ECM). Due to these interactions proteases such as tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) are linked to the ECM glycoprotein laminin. This leads to a partial inactivation of the enzyme. Within the group of catechins we found a positive correlation between anti-invasive activity and linking of t-PA to laminin. Citrus flavonoids are also anti-invasive in vitro (tangeretin greater than nobiletin greater than hesperidin = naringin). However, these stable molecules show poor affinity for ECM, and do not link enzymes to laminin. These data suggest that catechins and citrus flavonoids inhibit invasion in vitro by different mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of basement membrane molecules on directional migration of human breast cell lines in vitro.
Coopman, P. J.; Bracke, M. E.; Lissitzky, J. C. et al

in Journal of Cell Science (1991), 98(Pt 3), 395-401

Spheroidal cell aggregates were prepared from four tumorigenic human breast cell lines (HBL-100 and three MCF-7 variants). Cells from these aggregates were allowed to migrate towards lanes of basement ... [more ▼]

Spheroidal cell aggregates were prepared from four tumorigenic human breast cell lines (HBL-100 and three MCF-7 variants). Cells from these aggregates were allowed to migrate towards lanes of basement membrane components coated on a glass substratum. Matrigel (reconstituted basement membrane) lanes permanently arrested the migration of one MCF-7 cell line, while migration of the others was permitted. Amongst several purified basement membrane constituents only laminin, not collagen type IV or fibronectin, was found to cause the same arrest of migration. Within the laminin molecule only the pepsin P1, not the elastase E8 fragment, efficiently arrested migration of that cell line. Although migration was inhibited by these components, time-lapse video recordings revealed that arrested cells still proliferated and actively ruffled on top of the coatings. These data suggest that, amongst several basement membrane components, laminin can function as a stop signal for cell migration. Within laminin, this activity seems to be mainly associated with the P1 fragment. We conclude that laminin is the major determinant of the barrier-function of the basement membrane, to which some cell types have become insensitive. [less ▲]

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See detailLaminin binding and internalization by human and murine mammary gland cell lines in vitro.
Coopman, P. J.; Nuydens, R.; Leunissen, J. et al

in European Journal of Cell Biology (1991), 56(2), 251-9

We have studied the binding and internalization of Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm mouse sarcoma laminin labeled with colloidal gold (LN-G40) by human and murine mammary gland cell lines. Interactions between the ... [more ▼]

We have studied the binding and internalization of Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm mouse sarcoma laminin labeled with colloidal gold (LN-G40) by human and murine mammary gland cell lines. Interactions between the LN-G40 probe and the cells spread on a glass coverslip were monitored with video-enhanced contrast microscopy (Nanovid). Transmission electron microscopy allowed the quantitation of the LN-G40 probe at various cellular locations. During the first 15 min, a homogeneous binding of LN-G40 probe to the cell surface was observed with all cell lines. This binding did not occur with gold particles that were not conjugated to laminin. Then, the LN-G40 probe began to cluster on the cell surface and was, during the following 20 h, internalized by pits that were not coated. In the cells, the LN-G40 probe sometimes showed saltatory movements along linear tracks. The LN-G40 probe was intracellularly found in vesicles, multivesicular bodies, cisternal structures, and lysosomes, suggesting the degradation of the internalized laminin. However, not all cell surface-bound LN-G40 probe was internalized after 20 h. Differences between the cell lines were quantitative, but no clear correlation could be made between migration of cells on laminin and internalization of laminin. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of laminin and fibroblasts upon colony formation by B16 melanoma cells
De Leval, Laurence; Leyh, Philippe; Grégoire, Dominique et al

Poster (1990, September)

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See detailCharacterization of tridimensional mixed cultures of mouse B16 melanoma cells and 3T3 fibroblasts
Coucke, Paul; Siwek, Brigitte; Munaut, Carine ULg et al

Conference (1990, September)

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See detailReconstituted basement membrane matrix stimulates interstitial procollagenase synthesis by human fibroblasts in culture.
Emonard, H.; Christiane, Y.; Munaut, Carine ULg et al

in Matrix (Stuttgart, Germany) (1990), 10(6), 373-7

Synthesis of interstitial collagenase by human fibroblasts was compared when cultured on plastic, in the presence or absence of soluble laminin, on a type I collagen gel and on a gel of basement membrane ... [more ▼]

Synthesis of interstitial collagenase by human fibroblasts was compared when cultured on plastic, in the presence or absence of soluble laminin, on a type I collagen gel and on a gel of basement membrane components (matrigel). Fibroblasts cultured on matrigel or on type I collagen gel displayed an increase in the steady-state levels of mRNA for interstitial procollagenase that was proportional to its enzymatic activity. Laminin, the main component of matrigel, had no effect on the interstitial collagenase synthesis by fibroblasts. We suggest that matrigel, which stimulates the interstitial collagenase production at a transcriptional step, could regulate the catabolic potential of fibroblasts. [less ▲]

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See detailPlacental and Pituitary Growth Hormone Secretion During Pregnancy in Acromegalic Women
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1990), 71(3), 725-31

It is now well established that during the second half of normal pregnancy, the human placenta secretes its specific GH variant (placental GH) in increasing amounts up to delivery. During the same period ... [more ▼]

It is now well established that during the second half of normal pregnancy, the human placenta secretes its specific GH variant (placental GH) in increasing amounts up to delivery. During the same period, pituitary GH secretion is progressively suppressed. The present study was aimed at clarifying the physiology of GH secretion in pregnant acromegalic women. Two young women remained acromegalic despite transphenoidal removal of their pituitary adenoma. Increased basal levels of GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) as well as paradoxical GH release after TRH injection were noted. Both women became pregnant and delivered term babies without any complication. In both patients, pituitary GH remained elevated during the entire pregnancy, contrary to the situation in normal women. Paradoxical GH release after TRH treatment was also present, whereas no response was observed in five normal control subjects. GH pulsatility studies revealed a highly pulsatile secretory pattern of pituitary GH, in contrast to that in normal woman, whose placental GH is secreted tonically. Tissue placental GH concentrations were within the range of levels in normal placentas. An increase in serum IGF-I in late pregnancy was also similar to that observed in normal pregnancy. These findings confirm that increased IGF-I levels are not pituitary GH dependent in late pregnancy. They add new evidence that adenomatous somatotrophs lack an IGF-I-dependent feedback regulation present in normal somatotrophs. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of laminin and fibroblasts upon colony formation in the mouse by B16 melanoma cell spheroids
de Leval, Laurence; Leyh, Philippe; Grégoire, Dominique et al

in Anticancer Research (1990), 10(5B), 1447

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See detailThe presence of a type IV collagen skeleton associated with periductal elastosis in breast cancer
Verhoeven, D.; Bourgeois, N.; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry : Official Journal of the Histochemistry Society (1990), 38

Using serial sections of frozen and AFA-fixed tissues from 34 breast cancers, we studied the presence of basement membrane material in the areas of elastosis. Various amounts of type IV collagen but not ... [more ▼]

Using serial sections of frozen and AFA-fixed tissues from 34 breast cancers, we studied the presence of basement membrane material in the areas of elastosis. Various amounts of type IV collagen but not of laminin were demonstrated in areas of periductal elastosis. In some tumors, type IV collagen accumulated beneath the basement membrane. Periductal elastosis in areas of extensive fibrosis showed focal type IV collagen immunoreactivity, indicating remnants of ducts. Interstitial elastosis corresponded with weak type IV collagen reactivity. Each tumor showed type IV collagen immunostaining of the elastotic areas, with various degrees of intensity. Negative crossreactivity of the type IV collagen antibody with elastin was verified in skin biopsies with solar elastosis. Pre-incubation of the antibody with large amounts of elastin demonstrated an identical immunoreactivity. The specificity of the antibody was confirmed by ELISA and by Western blot analysis. To explain the periductal elastosis, we propose the following hypothesis. Excessive production of basement membrane material by the epithelial cells of the ducts leads to formation of a type IV collagen skeleton. This skeleton can act as the matrix for a secondary deposition of elastic material. [less ▲]

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See detailType Iv and Interstitial Collagenolytic Activities in Normal and Malignant Trophoblast Cells Are Specifically Regulated by the Extracellular Matrix
Emonard, H.; Christiane, Y.; Smet, M. et al

in Invasion & Metastasis (1990), 10(3), 170-7

Type IV and interstitial collagenolytic activities were compared in human malignant and normal trophoblast cells cultured on plastic, in presence or absence of laminin in solution, on matrigel (a gel of ... [more ▼]

Type IV and interstitial collagenolytic activities were compared in human malignant and normal trophoblast cells cultured on plastic, in presence or absence of laminin in solution, on matrigel (a gel of basement membrane components) and on type I collagen gel. Laminin highly stimulated the type IV collagenolytic activity but not the interstitial collagenolytic activity, in malignant trophoblast cells. This glycoprotein had no effect on the interstitial collagenolytic activity and doubled the type IV collagenolytic activity in normal trophoblast cells. Thus malignant trophoblast cells produce preferentially the enzyme able to degrade basement membrane when in contact with laminin, and the enzyme able to degrade interstitial collagen fibers when cultured on type I collagen. On the contrary, type I collagen gel and matrigel equally increased both type IV and interstitial collagenolytic activities by normal trophoblast cells. Interactions of tumor trophoblast or normal trophoblast cells with the extracellular matrix result thus in distinct stimulations of collagenolytic activities. Increased production of type IV collagenolytic activity upon exposure to laminin appears to be specific of the metastatic phenotype. [less ▲]

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See detailThe physiology of pituitary and placental GH function during pregnancy in acromegalic as compared on normal women
Beckers, Albert ULg; Frankenne, F.; Stevenaert, Achille ULg et al

in Endocrinology under 35, sienna italy - Abstract book (1990)

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See detailRenal biopsy and family studies in 65 children with isolated hematuria.
Schroder, C.; Bontemps, C.; Assmann, K. et al

in Acta Paediatrica Scandinavica (1990), 79(6-7), 630-6

We have investigated 65 children with isolated hematuria persisting for at least a year. Renal biopsy specimens were studied by light microscopy, electron microscopy and immunofluorescence with antisera ... [more ▼]

We have investigated 65 children with isolated hematuria persisting for at least a year. Renal biopsy specimens were studied by light microscopy, electron microscopy and immunofluorescence with antisera specific against basement membrane components. The majority of the biopsies (62/65) showed variable histologic abnormalities. Four categories could be distinguished on combined histological and clinical criteria: Alport syndrome (n = 8), benign hematuria (n = 33, familial in 23), IgA nephropathy (n = 16) and increase in mesangial cells and matrix (n = 5). On the basis of our results, we suggest that a renal biopsy can establish diagnosis and prognosis in those children with isolated hematuria where the family history is negative. If the family has adult male individuals with isolated hematuria, a biopsy can usually be avoided, since this family history effectively excludes Alport syndrome. The use of antisera against basement membrane components did not allow a differentiation between Alport syndrome and benign hematuria. Goodpasture serum immunofluorescence was variable in the former and normally present in the latter. [less ▲]

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See detailPossible Role of Human Natural Anti-Gal Antibodies in the Natural Antitumor Defense System
Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Colin, Claude ULg; Parent, B. et al

in Journal of the National Cancer Institute (1989), 81(3), 212-6

Expression of Gal alpha 1-3Gal cell surface residues has been correlated with the metastatic potential of murine tumor cells. We report that Gal alpha 1-3Gal residues are expressed at the cell surface of ... [more ▼]

Expression of Gal alpha 1-3Gal cell surface residues has been correlated with the metastatic potential of murine tumor cells. We report that Gal alpha 1-3Gal residues are expressed at the cell surface of malignant human cancer cells, including four cell lines and 50% of the malignant breast specimens obtained by aspiration biopsy. In contrast, all benign breast biopsies and normal cells were Gal alpha 1-3Gal negative. Affinity-purified anti-alpha-galactosyl IgG (anti-Gal) antibody, which specifically recognizes Gal alpha 1-3Gal residues, significantly inhibited cell attachment in two in vitro assays thought to indicate tumor cell extravasation of the circulatory system during the metastatic process: attachment to perfused human umbilical vein endothelium, and attachment to isolated laminin. Since anti-Gal antibody is a natural component of all human sera, we propose that it may be part of the natural antitumor defense system in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailCooperativity between fibroblasts and melanoma cells during invasion
Siwek, Brigitte; Munaut, Carine ULg; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire ULg et al

Conference (1989)

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See detailThe physiology of pituitary and placental GH secretion during pregnancy in acromegalic as compared to normal women.
Beckers, Albert ULg; Frankenne, F.; Stevenaert, Achille ULg et al

in Journal of Endocrinological Investigation (1989)

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See detailReactivity of human anti-alpha-galactosyl IgG antibody with alpha(1-->3)-linked galactosyl epitopes exposed on basement membranes and on glomerular epithelial cells: an in vitro and in vivo study in the mouse.
Vecchi, M. L.; Davin, J. C.; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Clinical & Experimental Immunology (1989), 78(2), 271-7

Anti-alpha-galactosyl antibody (a-Gal Ab) is a human natural antibody belonging to the IgG class, found in high titres in all normal sera regardless of blood group, and specifically recognizing alpha (1 ... [more ▼]

Anti-alpha-galactosyl antibody (a-Gal Ab) is a human natural antibody belonging to the IgG class, found in high titres in all normal sera regardless of blood group, and specifically recognizing alpha (1-->3)-linked galactosyl residues. We have observed by radioimmunoassay, ELISA, passive haemagglutination and immunofluorescence blocking studies that affinity-purified a-Gal Ab reacted with mouse laminin, but not with the other mouse basement membrane proteins tested; it was able to fix complement in vitro. When injected intravenously into mice, the a-Gal Ab was found to mainly accumulate in kidneys, liver, spleen and lungs. No acute respiratory distress syndrome was observed shortly after the i.v. injection of 100 or 200 microg of antibodies. These doses of a-Gal Ab were also unable to induce acute glomerular injury. However, in primary cultures, the a-Gal Ab (100 or 200 microg per ml of medium) was shown to impair the attachment of mouse glomerular epithelial cells to mouse laminin and to elicit complement-dependent cell damage. The data indicate that the a-Gal Ab can interact in vitro and/or in vivo with alpha (1-->3)-linked galactosyl residues exposed on murine laminin or on murine cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Although this antibody fails to be pathogenic when administered at low doses in the intact animal, similar doses can alter some metabolic properties of these cells in vitro. [less ▲]

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