References of "FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMesurer la douleur chez le patient non communicant.
Chatelle, Camille ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Mergam, Anne-Nora ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63(5-6), 429-37

Pain is a subjective experience. Its assessment is based on the subject's direct verbal report. This method of assessment is, however, impossible in patients who cannot communicate their feelings. In this ... [more ▼]

Pain is a subjective experience. Its assessment is based on the subject's direct verbal report. This method of assessment is, however, impossible in patients who cannot communicate their feelings. In this context, indirect measurements such as behavioral observations or physiological measurements are needed. To facilitate the assessment of pain in non-communicative patients, numerous standardized behavioral scales have been developed. The aim of this review is to discuss the main validated pain scales employed in end-stage dementia, newborn and preverbal children, and severely brain damaged patients with a disorder of consciousness such as coma, the vegetative state or the minimally conscious state. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 1409 (22 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailfMRI study of hypnosis-induced analgesia
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2007, May), 254(Suppl. 3), 38-39

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNaloxone-insensitive epidural placebo analgesia in a chronic pain patient.
Kupers, Ron; Maeyaert, Jan; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Anesthesiology (2007), 106(6), 1239-42

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInteret de la revalidation aerobie dans la prise en charge de la fibromyalgie
Maquet, Didier ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Demoulin, Christophe ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2006), 61(2), 109-16

This study assesses the influence of a muscular aerobic revalidation program on the management of the fibromyalgia syndrome. After 3 months, benefits consisting of increased muscle performances associated ... [more ▼]

This study assesses the influence of a muscular aerobic revalidation program on the management of the fibromyalgia syndrome. After 3 months, benefits consisting of increased muscle performances associated with a reduction of pain and an improvement of quality of life were documented. This study confirms the value of aerobic muscle exercise in fibromyalgia patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 260 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFunctional neuroanatomy of the hypnotic state.
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg

in Journal of Physiology - Paris (2006), 99(4-6), 463-9

The neural mechanisms underlying hypnosis and especially the modulation of pain perception by hypnosis remain obscure. Using PET we first described the distribution of regional cerebral blood flow during ... [more ▼]

The neural mechanisms underlying hypnosis and especially the modulation of pain perception by hypnosis remain obscure. Using PET we first described the distribution of regional cerebral blood flow during the hypnotic state. Hypnosis relied on revivification of pleasant autobiographical memories and was compared to imaging autobiographical material in "normal alertness". The hypnotic state was related to the activation of a widespread set of cortical areas involving occipital, parietal, precentral, premotor, and ventrolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. This pattern of activation shares some similarities with mental imagery, from which it mainly differs by the relative deactivation of precuneus. Second, we looked at the anti-nociceptive effects of hypnosis. Compared to the resting state, hypnosis reduced pain perception by approximately 50%. The hypnosis-induced reduction of affective and sensory responses to noxious thermal stimulation were modulated by the activity in the midcingulate cortex (area 24a'). Finally, we assessed changes in cerebral functional connectivity related to hypnosis. Compared to normal alertness (i.e., rest and mental imagery), the hypnotic state, significantly enhanced the functional modulation between midcingulate cortex and a large neural network involved in sensory, affective, cognitive and behavioral aspects of nociception. These findings show that not only pharmacological but also psychological strategies for pain control can modulate the cerebral network involved in noxious perception. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in severely brain injured patients: Differences between VS and MCS
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2005), 15(3-4, Jul-Sep), 283-289

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS ... [more ▼]

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS patients show activation similar to controls in response to auditory, emotional and noxious stimuli. Despite an apparent clinical similarity between MCS and VS patients, functional imaging data show striking differences in cortical segregation and integration between these two conditions. However, in the absence of a generally accepted neural correlate of consciousness as measured by functional neuroirnaging, clinical assessment remains the gold standard for the evaluation and management of severely brain damaged patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe cognitive modulation of pain: hypnosis- and placebo-induced analgesia.
Kupers, Ron; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg

in Progress in Brain Research (2005), 150

Nowadays, there is compelling evidence that there is a poor relationship between the incoming sensory input and the resulting pain sensation. Signals coming from the peripheral nervous system undergo a ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, there is compelling evidence that there is a poor relationship between the incoming sensory input and the resulting pain sensation. Signals coming from the peripheral nervous system undergo a complex modulation by cognitive, affective, and motivational processes when they enter the central nervous system. Placebo- and hypnosis-induced analgesia form two extreme examples of how cognitive processes may influence the pain sensation. With the advent of modern brain imaging techniques, researchers have started to disentangle the brain mechanisms involved in these forms of cognitive modulation of pain. These studies have shown that the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices form important structures in a descending pathway that modulates incoming sensory input, likely via activation of the endogenous pain modulatory structures in the midbrain periaqueductal gray. Although little is known about the receptor systems involved in hypnosis-induced analgesia, studies of the placebo response suggest that the opiodergic and dopaminergic systems play an important role in the mediation of the placebo response. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe locked-in syndrome : what is it like to be conscious but paralyzed and voiceless?
Laureys, Steven ULg; Pellas, Frédéric; Van Eeckhout, Philippe et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2005), 150(Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology), 495-511

The locked-in syndrome (pseudocoma) describes patients who are awake and conscious but selectively deefferented, i.e., have no means of producing speech, limb or facial movements. Acute ventral pontine ... [more ▼]

The locked-in syndrome (pseudocoma) describes patients who are awake and conscious but selectively deefferented, i.e., have no means of producing speech, limb or facial movements. Acute ventral pontine lesions are its most common cause. People with such brainstem lesions often remain comatose for some days or weeks, needing artificial respiration and then gradually wake up, but remaining paralyzed and voiceless, superficially resembling patients in a vegetative state or akinetic mutism, In acute locked-in syndrome (LIS), eye-coded communication and evaluation of cognitive and emotional functioning is very limited because vigilance is fluctuating and eye movements may be inconsistent, very small, and easily exhausted. It has been shown that more than half of the time it is the family and not the physician who first realized that the patient was aware. Distressingly, recent studies reported that the diagnosis of LIS on average takes over 2.5 months. In some cases it took 4-6 years before aware and sensitive patients, locked in an immobile body, were recognized as being conscious. Once a LIS patient becomes medically stable, and given appropriate medical care, life expectancy increases to several decades. Even if the chances of good motor recovery are very limited, existing eye-controlled, computer-based communication technology currently allow the patient to control his environment, use a word processor coupled to a speech synthesizer, and access the worldwide net. Healthy individuals and medical professionals sometimes assume that the quality of life of an LIS patient is so poor that it is not worth living. On the contrary, chronic LIS patients typically self-report meaningful quality of life and their demand for euthanasia is surprisingly infrequent. Biased clinicians might provide less aggressive medical treatment and influence the family in inappropriate ways. It is important to stress that only the medically stabilized, informed LIS patient is competent to consent to or refuse life-sustaining treatment. Patients suffering from LIS should not be denied the right tot die - and to die with dignity - but also, and more importantly, and pain and symptom management. In our opinion, there is an urgent need for a renewed ethical and medicolegal framework for our care of locked-in patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 158 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailZerebrale Funktionen bei hirngeschädigten Patienten. Was bedeuten Koma, "vegetative state“, "minimally conscious state“, "Locked-in-Syndrom“ und Hirntod?
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Pantke, Karl-Heinz; Berré, Jacques et al

in Anaesthesist (2004), 53(12), 1195-1202

Comatose, vegetative, minimally conscious or locked-in patients represent a problem in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and everyday management at the intensive care unit. The evaluation of ... [more ▼]

Comatose, vegetative, minimally conscious or locked-in patients represent a problem in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and everyday management at the intensive care unit. The evaluation of possible cognitive functions in these patients is difficult because voluntary movements may be very small, inconsistent and easily exhausted. Functional neuroimaging cannot replace the clinical assessment of patients with altered states of consciousness. Nevertheless, it can describe objectively how deviant from normal the cerebral activity is and its regional distribution at rest and under various conditions of stimulation. The quantification of brain activity differentiates patients who sometimes only differ by a brief and incomplete blink of an eye. In the present paper, we will first try to define consciousness as it can be assessed at the patient's bedside. We then review the major clinical entities of altered states of consciousness encountered in the intensive care unit. Finally, we discuss the functional neuroanatomy of these conditions as assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 139 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIndications des corticoides par voie peridurale dans les douleurs rachidiennes et radiculaires
Fontaine, Robert ULg; Tomasella, Marco ULg; Martin, Didier ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2004), 59(10), 557-64

Back pain is very frequent in western countries and it represents a very high social cost. The treatment is based on five modalities: medication, physiotherapy, invasive technics, rehabilitation programs ... [more ▼]

Back pain is very frequent in western countries and it represents a very high social cost. The treatment is based on five modalities: medication, physiotherapy, invasive technics, rehabilitation programs and psycho-social approaches. Several treatments may be proposed simultaneously and introduced gradually. Steroid administration by epidural injection is frequently used in Belgium, even though no prospective randomised studies have shown a real benefit over the long term. The indications for epidural injection must be carefully chosen. These include subacute pain (less than six months) in the lower limbs despite a well observed medical treatment. Patients are invited to give informed consent; the technic must be performed in an appropriate environment by an experienced physician. The initial treatment of back pain is medical. This pathology is multifactorial and the relief of symptoms is often incomplete. The patient should be urged to feel responsible for and involved in his treatment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 145 (19 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailReporting systems in healthcare from a case-by-case experience to a general framework: an example in anaesthesia
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULg; Aunac, Sophie; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg et al

in European Journal of Anaesthesiology (2004), 21(10), 757-765

Reporting systems are becoming more widespread in healthcare. Since they may become mandatory under the pressure of insurance companies and administrative organizations, it is important to begin to go ... [more ▼]

Reporting systems are becoming more widespread in healthcare. Since they may become mandatory under the pressure of insurance companies and administrative organizations, it is important to begin to go beyond a case-by-case approach and to move to a system where there is a general reflection on the best conditions of development and setting up of such systems in medicine. In this paper, we review existing reporting systems, break down their components, examine how they are constructed and propose some ideas on how to articulate them in a dynamic process in order to improve the validity of the tool as mediator of safety, quality and well-being at work. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeurophysiological mechanisms of hypnosis
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg

in International Journal of Psychophysiology (2004, September), 54(1-2), 43-44

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailPrise en charge de la douleur chronique en équipe pluridisciplinaire
Fontaine, Robert ULg; Fuchs, Sonia; Hardy, Régine ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2004), 59(2), 81-88

Assessment of chronic pain is one of medicine's most difficult challenges. A structured and flexible multidisciplinary approach allows full characterisation of the various components of the pain syndrome ... [more ▼]

Assessment of chronic pain is one of medicine's most difficult challenges. A structured and flexible multidisciplinary approach allows full characterisation of the various components of the pain syndrome. This then allows the use of a rational combination of pharmacologic, physical, psychological, and surgical techniques. It is essential to gain the patient's confidence, collaboration, and compliance. Patients can better manage their situation when their needs are clarified and when care is oriented toward concrete therapeutic objectives. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 271 (34 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAuditory processing in severely brain injured patients: differences between the minimally conscious state and the persistent vegetative state.
Boly, Mélanie ULg; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Archives of Neurology (2004), 61(2), 233-8

BACKGROUND: The minimally conscious state (MCS) is a recently defined clinical condition; it differs from the persistent vegetative state (PVS) by the presence of inconsistent, but clearly discernible ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The minimally conscious state (MCS) is a recently defined clinical condition; it differs from the persistent vegetative state (PVS) by the presence of inconsistent, but clearly discernible, behavioral evidence of consciousness. OBJECTIVE: To study auditory processing among patients who are in an MCS, patients who are in a PVS, and healthy control subjects. METHODS: By means of (15)O-radiolabeled water-positron emission tomography, we measured changes in regional cerebral blood flow induced by auditory click stimuli in 5 patients in an MCS, 15 patients in a PVS, and 18 healthy controls. RESULTS: In both patients in an MCS and the healthy controls, auditory stimulation activated bilateral superior temporal gyri (Brodmann areas 41, 42, and 22). In patients in a PVS, the activation was restricted to Brodmann areas 41 and 42 bilaterally. We also showed that, compared with patients in a PVS, patients in an MCS demonstrated a stronger functional connectivity between the secondary auditory cortex and temporal and prefrontal association cortices. CONCLUSIONS: Although assumptions about the level of consciousness in severely brain injured patients are difficult to make, our findings suggest that the cerebral activity observed in patients in an MCS is more likely to lead to higher-order integrative processes, thought to be necessary for the gain of conscious auditory perception. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailBrain function in the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; De Tiège, Xavier et al

in Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness (2004)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResidual cerebral functioning in the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; De Tiège, X. et al

in Arco di Giano (2004)

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (34 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIncreased cerebral functional connectivity underlying the antinociceptive effects of hypnosis
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Roediger, Laurence ULg; Del Fiore, Guy et al

in Cognitive Brain Research (2003), 17(2), 255-262

The neural mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effects of hypnosis are not well understood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we recently showed that the activity in the anterior cingulate ... [more ▼]

The neural mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effects of hypnosis are not well understood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we recently showed that the activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (midcingulate area 24a') covaries with the hypnosis-induced reduction of affective and sensory responses to noxious thermal stimulation [Faymonville et al., Anesthesiology 92 (2000) 1257-1267]. In the present study, we assessed changes in cerebral functional connectivity related to the hypnotic state, compared to simple distraction and the resting state. Nineteen highly hypnotizable right-handed volunteers were studied using (H2O)-O-15-PET. The experimental conditions were hot noxious or warm non-noxious stimulation of the right hand during resting state, mental imagery and hypnotic state. Using a psychophysiological interaction analysis, we identified brain areas that would respond to noxious stimulations under the modulatory action of the midcingulate cortex in, and only in, the hypnotic state. Hypnosis, compared to the resting state, reduced pain perception by 50%. Pain perception during rest and mental imagery was not significantly different. Analysis of PET data showed that the hypnotic state, compared to normal alertness (i.e., rest and mental imagery), significantly enhanced the functional modulation between midcingulate cortex and a large neural network encompassing bilateral insula, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, pre-supplementary motor area, right prefrontal cortex and striatum, thalamus and brainstem. These findings point to a critical role for the midcingulate cortex in the modulation of a large cortical and subcortical network underlying its influence on sensory, affective, Cognitive and behavioral aspects of nociception, in the specific context of hypnosis. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (13 ULg)