References of "Etienne, Anne-Marie"
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See detailLes besoins psychosociaux et le soutien apporté aux patients atteints d'un cancer : une étude nationale belge
Libert, Yves; Merckaert, Isabelle; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg et al

in Oncologie (2006), (8), 465-476

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See detailManuel de formation à la gestion du stress et à la communication avec des patients cancéreux et leurs proches
Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg; Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Libert, Yves et al

in CHASSEIGNE, Gérard (Ed.) Stress, santé, société (2006)

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See detailLe questionnaire d'interaction Travail-Famille de Nijmegen : resultats preliminaires et interet pour la clinique
Hansez, Isabelle ULg; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg; Geurts, S.

in Revue Francophone de Clinique Comportementale et Cognitive (2006), 11(2), 1-13

The first purpose of this paper was to analyse the psychometric properties of the French version of the most frequently used survey for measuring work-home interaction, i.e. the Survey Work-home ... [more ▼]

The first purpose of this paper was to analyse the psychometric properties of the French version of the most frequently used survey for measuring work-home interaction, i.e. the Survey Work-home Interaction – Nijmegen (SWING). The second purpose was to determine the direction of influence (with an origin in one domain – work or home- and an impact in the other domain) and the quality of impact (being positive or negative). The third objective was to check the consistency of the scores across relevant sub-groups such as gender and working time. Three cross-sectional surveys (in total, N=254) were conducted. The French version of the SWING, including 24 items, presents acceptable internal consistency and reliability coefficients. The direction of work-home interaction shows a positive impact of work in the family domain. Finally there is some evidence for relevant gender and working time effects. The clinical interest of this questionnaire is also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailL'aide à l'arrêt du tabagisme : une nécessité
Delvaux, Muriel ULg; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg; Bartsch, Pierre ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2005), 60(11), 863-866

Today the smoker carries a risk of mortality 70% higher compared to the nonsmoker. In Belgium active smoking is indisputably the most important cause of avoidable death. In 2004 it appears that 27% of the ... [more ▼]

Today the smoker carries a risk of mortality 70% higher compared to the nonsmoker. In Belgium active smoking is indisputably the most important cause of avoidable death. In 2004 it appears that 27% of the belgian population was smoking. This review describes the comorbidity associated with active tobacco consumption and defines the concepts of dependence and smoking cessation. It also identifies the three factors which determine the success of smoking cessation, i.e. the degree of nicotinic dependence, the presence of anxio-depressive disorders and the importance of the motivation to the stop. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors that influence physicians' detection of distress in patients with cancer - Can a communication skills training program improve physicians' detection?
Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves; Delvaux, Nicole et al

in Cancer (2005), 104(2), 411-421

BACKGROUND. No study to date has assessed the impact of skills acquisition after a communication skills training program on physicians' ability to detect distress in patients with cancer. METHODS. First ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND. No study to date has assessed the impact of skills acquisition after a communication skills training program on physicians' ability to detect distress in patients with cancer. METHODS. First, the authors used a randomized design to assess the impact, on physicians' ability to detect patients' distress, of a 1-hour theoretical information course followed by 2 communication skills training programs: a 2.5-day basic training program and the same training program consolidated by 6 3-hour consolidation workshops. Then, the investigate contextual, patient, and communication variables or factors associated with physicians' detection of patients' distress were investigated. After they attended the basic communication skills training program, physicians were assigned randomly to consolidation workshops or to a waiting list. Interviews with a cancer patient were recorded before training, after consolidation workshops for the group that attended consolidation workshops, and approximate to 5 months after basic training for the group that attended basic training without the consolidation workshops. Patient distress was recorded with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale before the interviews. Physicians rated their patients' distress on a visual analog scale after the interviews. Physicians' ability to detect patients' distress was measured through computing differences between physicians' ratings of patients' distress and patients' self-reported distress. Communication skills were analyzed according to the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. RESULTS. Fifty-eight physicians were evaluable. Repeated -measures analysis of variance showed no statistically significant changes over time and between groups in physicians' ability to assess patient distress. Mixed-effects modeling showed that physicians' detection of patients' distress was associated negatively with patients' educational level (P = 0.042) and with patients' self-reported distress (P < 0.000). Mixed-effects modeling also showed that physicians' detection of patient distress was associated positively with physicians breaking bad news (P = 0.022) and using assessment skills (P = 0.015) and supportive skills (P = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS. Contrary to what was expected, no change was observed in physicians' ability to detect distress in patients with cancer after a communication skills training programs, regardless of whether physicians attended the basic training program or the basic training program followed by the consolidation workshops. The results indicated a need for further improvements in physicians' detection skills through specific training modules, including theoretical information about factors that interfere with physicians' detection and through role-playing exercises that focus on assessment and supportive skills that facilitate detection. (c) 2005 American Cancer Society. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysicians' communication with a cancer patient and a relative - A randomized study assessing the efficacy of consolidation workshops
Delvaux, N.; Merckaert, I.; Marchal, S. et al

in Cancer (2005), 103(11), 2397-2411

BACKGROUND. Although patients with cancer are often accompanied by a relative during medical interviews, to the authors' knowledge little is known regarding the efficacy of communication skills training ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND. Although patients with cancer are often accompanied by a relative during medical interviews, to the authors' knowledge little is known regarding the efficacy of communication skills training programs on physicians' communication skills in this context. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy of 6 consolidation workshops, 3 hours in length, that were conducted after a 2.5-day basic training program. METHODS. After attending the basic training program, physicians were assigned randomly to consolidation workshops or to a waiting list. Training efficacy was assessed through simulated and actual interviews that were recorded on an audio tape at baseline, after consolidation workshops for the consolidation-workshops group, and 5 months after the end of basic training for the waiting-list group. Communication skills were assessed according to the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. Patients' and relatives' perceptions of and satisfaction with physicians' communication performance were assessed using a 15-item questionnaire. RESULTS. Sixty-two physicians completed the training program. Compared with physicians who participated to the basic training program, when addressing the patient, physicians who were randomized to the consolidation workshops used more open, open directive, and screening questions (P = 0.011 in simulated patient interviews and P = 0.005 in actual patient interviews) and elicited and clarified psychologic concerns more often (P = 0.006 in simulated patient interviews and P < 0.001 in actual patient interviews). When they addressed the relative, physicians who were randomized to the consolidation workshops gave less premature information (P = 0.032 in simulated patient interviews and P < 0.001 in actual patient interviews). When they addressed the patient and the relative simultaneously, physicians who were randomized to the consolidation workshops used more empathy, educated guesses, alerting to reality, confronting, negotiating, and summarizing (P = 0.003 in simulated patient interviews and P = 0.024 in actual patient interviews). Patients, but not relatives, who interacted with physicians in the consolidation-workshops group were more satisfied globally with the interviews (P = 0.022). CONCLUSIONS. Six 3-hour consolidation workshops resulted in improved communication skills addressed to patients and to relatives. The current results showed that the transfer of skills addressing relatives' concerns remained limited and that consolidation workshops should focus even more systematically on the practice of three-person interviews. (c) 2005 American Cancer Society. [less ▲]

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See detailQualité de vie au travail.
Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg

Scientific conference (2005, April 26)

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See detailQualité de vie et comportements de santé en Wallonie. Perspective développementale
Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg; Bourgeois, Emmanuelle ULg

in Germain, Marc; Potelle, Jean-François (Eds.) La Wallonie à l'aube de XXIe siècle. Portrait d'un pays et de ses habitants (2005)

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See detailLa prise en charge du patient cardiaque.
Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg

Scientific conference (2004, November 26)

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See detailLa sensibilité à l'anxiété, une synthèse
Chaboteaux, Martine; Delvaux, Muriel ULg; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg

in Revue Francophone de Clinique Comportementale et Cognitive (2004), IX(2), 1-8

This article makes a literature's overview about the concept of anxiety sensitivity, i.e. fear of anxiety sensations . After the definition of anxiety sensitivity and description of the main theorical ... [more ▼]

This article makes a literature's overview about the concept of anxiety sensitivity, i.e. fear of anxiety sensations . After the definition of anxiety sensitivity and description of the main theorical models, methods of measurement will be shown. Then, the comorbidity between anxiety sensitivity and anxiety disorders, more specifically panic disorder, as well as between anxiety sensitivity and hyperventilation, depression and chronic health disorders will be examined. At last, the treatment of anxiety sensitivity's benefits and some research perspectives will be considered. [less ▲]

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See detailQualité de vie et qualité de vie au travail chez des policiers liégeois
Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg; Martel, J.-P.; Dupuis, G.

Conference (2004, May 12)

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See detailEmpathie et Trouble Oppositionnel chez l'enfant de 8 à 12 ans
Dahmen, Caroline; Malpas, Anne; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg et al

in Revue Francophone de Clinique Comportementale et Cognitive (2004), IX(1), 3-11

A literature review underlines strong links between facial expression recognition difficulty, lack of empathy and behaviour disorder. The main goal of this study was to assess if, as it is suggested in ... [more ▼]

A literature review underlines strong links between facial expression recognition difficulty, lack of empathy and behaviour disorder. The main goal of this study was to assess if, as it is suggested in the literature, oppositional children presented an empathy deficit that can make them more aggressive. Forty children between 8 and 10 years old (15 control children and 15 oppositional children) were subjected to the “Empathy Response Task” from Ricard et Kamberk-Kilicci (1995). As expected, results show that oppositional children are significantly less empathic that control children. Anger is often assigned to protagonists even when it isn’t present. This can be interpreted by the “hostile attribution distortion” according to wich the children with behaviour disorders tend to allocate hostile intentions to others (Milich & Dodge, 1984). Working on empathy must be integrated in behaviour disorder children therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailLa place du psychologue dans les maladies cardiovasculaires.
Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2003)

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See detailIdentity and expression memory for happy and angry faces in social anxiety
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg et al

in Acta Psychologica (2003), 114(1), 1-15

We examined the influence of social anxiety on memory for both identity and emotional expressions of unfamiliar faces. Participants high and low in social anxiety were presented with happy and angry faces ... [more ▼]

We examined the influence of social anxiety on memory for both identity and emotional expressions of unfamiliar faces. Participants high and low in social anxiety were presented with happy and angry faces and were later asked to recognise the same faces displaying a neutral expression. They also had to remember what the initial expressions of the faces had been. Remember/know/guess judgements were asked both for identity and expression memory. For participants low in social anxiety, both identity and expression memory were more often associated with "remember" responses when the faces were previously seen with a happy rather than an angry expression. In contrast, the initial expression of the faces did not affect either identity or expression memory for participants high in social anxiety. We interpreted these findings by arguing that most people tend to preferentially elaborate positive rather than negative social stimuli that are important to the self and that this tendency may be reduced in high socially anxious individuals because of the negative meaning they tend to ascribe to positive social information. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHow to optimize physicians' communication skills in cancer care: Results of a randomized study assessing the usefulness of posttraining consolidation workshops
Razavi, D.; Merckaert, I.; Marchal, Sylvie ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2003), 21(16), 3141-3149

Purpose: Although there is wide recognition of the usefulness of improving physicians' communication skills, no studies have yet assessed the efficacy of post-training consolidation workshops. This study ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Although there is wide recognition of the usefulness of improving physicians' communication skills, no studies have yet assessed the efficacy of post-training consolidation workshops. This study aims to assess the efficacy of six 3-hour consolidation workshops conducted after a 2.5-day basic training program. Methods: Physicians, after attending the basic training program, were randomly assigned to consolidation workshops or to a waiting list. Training efficacy was assessed through simulated and actual patient interviews that were audiotaped at baseline and after consolidation workshops for the consolidation-workshop group, and approximately 5 months after the end of basic training for the waiting-list group. Communication skills were assessed according to the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. Patients' perceptions of communication skills improvement were assessed using a 14-item questionnaire. Results : Sixty-three physicians completed the training program. Communication skills improved significantly more in the consolidation-workshop group compared with the waiting-list group. In simulated interviews, group-by-time repeated measures analysis of variance showed a significant increase in open and open directive questions (P =.014) and utterances alerting patients to reality (P =.049), as well as a significant decrease in premature reassurance (P =.042). In actual patient interviews, results revealed a significant increase in acknowledgments (P =.022) and empathic statements (P =.009), in educated guesses (P =.041), and in negotiations (P =.008). Patients interacting with physicians who benefited from consolidation workshops reported higher scores concerning their physicians' understanding of their disease (P =.004). Conclusion: Consolidation workshops further improve a communication skills training program's efficacy and facilitate the transfer of acquired skills to clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of happy and angry expressions on identity and expression memory for unfamiliar faces
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Comblain, Christine et al

in Cognition & Emotion (2003), 17(4), 609-622

We investigated the influence of happy and angry expressions on memory for new faces. Participants were presented with happy and angry faces in an intentional or incidental learning condition and were ... [more ▼]

We investigated the influence of happy and angry expressions on memory for new faces. Participants were presented with happy and angry faces in an intentional or incidental learning condition and were later asked to recognise the same faces displaying a neutral expression. They also had to remember what the initial expressions of the faces had been. Remember/know/guess judgements were made both for identity and expression memory. Results showed that faces were better recognised when presented with a happy rather than an angry expression, but only when learning was intentional. This was mainly due to an increase of the I remember" responses for happy faces when encoding was intentional rather than incidental. In contrast, memory for emotional expressions was not different for happy and angry faces whatever the encoding conditions. We interpret these findings according to the social meaning of emotional expressions for the self. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the patient's quality of life by her relative in a breast cancer population
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Conradt, S.; Barchiesi, D. et al

in Psycho-Oncology (2003, June), 12(4, Suppl. S), 205-206

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See detailQualité de vie et qualité de vie au travail chez des policiers liégeois
Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg; Martel, J.-P.; Dupuis, G.

Conference (2003, May 21)

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