References of "Eppe, Gauthier"
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See detailApplication of the CALUX bioassay for epidemiological study: analyses of Belgian human plasma
Van Wouwe, Nathalie; Debacker, Noemi; Sasse, André et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2004)

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See detailDioxin/polychlorinated biphenyl body burden, diabetes and endometriosis: findings in a population-based study in Belgium
Fierens, S.; Mairesse, H.; Heilier, J. F. et al

in Biomarkers : Biochemical Indicators of Exposure, Response, & Susceptibility to Chemicals (2003), 8(6), 529-534

Dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants widely distributed in the food chain, which is the main source of human exposure. Their effects on human health at background ... [more ▼]

Dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants widely distributed in the food chain, which is the main source of human exposure. Their effects on human health at background exposure levels are still poorly understood. Recent epidemiological evidence suggests a possible association between these pollutants and diabetes. We report here the results of a population-based study in Belgium on 257 (142 women and 115 men) environmentally exposed subjects, including 10 cases of endometriosis and nine cases of diabetes. Seventeen 2,3,7,8-polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs or dioxins), four coplanar PCBs (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry [IUPAC] nos 77, 81, 126 and 169) and 12 PCB markers ( IUPAC nos 3, 8, 28, 52, 101, 118, 138, 153, 180, 194, 206 and 209) were quantified in serum fat from fasting blood samples in order to estimate the body burden of these pollutants. Whilst no difference was found between women with endometriosis and their controls, diabetic patients had significantly increased serum levels of dioxins, coplanar PCBs and the 12 PCB markers. After adjustment for age and other covariates, serum total toxic equivalent activity (sum of PCDD/Fs and coplanar PCBs) and 12 PCB marker concentrations in diabetics were 62% (p=0.0005) and 39% (p=0.0067) higher, respectively, than in controls. The risk of diabetes was significantly increased in subjects in the top decile for adjusted concentrations of dioxins (odds ratio 5.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-21.7), coplanar PCBs (odds ratio 13.3, 95% CI 3.31-53.2) or 12 PCB markers (odds ratio 7.6, 95% CI 1.58-36.3). These findings warrant further studies to assess the significance of the associations between diabetes and environmental exposure to polychlorinated pollutants. [less ▲]

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See detailDioxin accumulation in residents around incinerators
Fierens, S.; Mairesse, H.; Hermans, C. et al

in Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A (2003), 66(14), 1287-1293

To evaluate the human exposure impact of municipal waste incinerators, dioxin and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations were determined in blood of 84 subjects who resided approximately ... [more ▼]

To evaluate the human exposure impact of municipal waste incinerators, dioxin and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations were determined in blood of 84 subjects who resided approximately 18 yr in the vicinity of two old incinerators, one located in a rural area (n = 51) and the other in an industrial area (n = 33). These subjects were compared with 63 controls from an unpolluted area. While no change was found in contaminant levels in residents living around the incinerator in the industrial area, subjects residing around the incinerator in the rural area possessed significantly higher serum levels of dioxins (38 vs. 24 pg TEQ/g fat) and coplanar PCBs (10 vs. 7 pg TEQ/g fat) than controls. These results were confirmed by multiple-regression analysis, showing that residence around the incinerator in the rural area (partial r(2) = .18) was the major contributor to dioxin accumulation followed by age (partial r(2) = .07). A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on age-adjusted dioxin levels revealed a significant interaction between residence around incinerators and the consumption of fat from local origin, especially bovine and poultry products. Although age-adjusted dioxin levels in controls did not vary with local animal fat consumption, concentrations of dioxins in subjects living around the incinerators increased proportionally to their intake of local animal fat, with almost a doubling in subjects with a fat intake higher than 150 gfat/wk. Extrapolation from these data suggests that a significant increase of dioxin body burden is likely to occur only when dioxin emissions exceed 5 ng TEQ/Nm(3), a threshold considerably above most emissions standards currently in force. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased dioxin/PCB body burden in diabetics: findings in a population-based study in Belgium
Fierens, S.; Mairesse, H.; Heilier, H. et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2003), 60-65

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See detailValidation and discussion of CALUX analysis for marine samples
Windal, Isabelle; Van Wouwe, Nathalie; Carbonnelle, Sophie et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2003)

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See detailSelective adsorption of dioxins and PCBs from marine oils on activated carbon
De Meulenaer, Bruno; Maes, Jeroen; Van Heerswynghels, Peter et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2003)

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See detailAnalysis of PCDD/Fs in human blood plasma using CALUX bioassay and GC-HRMS: a comparison
Van Wouwe, Nathalie; Eppe, Gauthier ULg; Xhrouet, Céline ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2003)

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See detailDioxins, furans and dioxin-like PCBs in juvenile harbour porpoises (Phocoena Phocoena) from the North sea
Beans, Cristina; Debacker, Virginie ULg; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2003)

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See detailLevels and congener distributions of PCDDs, PCDFs and non-ortho PCBs in Belgian foodstuffs - Assessment of dietary intake
Focant, Jean-François ULg; Eppe, Gauthier ULg; Pirard, C. et al

in Chemosphere (2002), 48(2), 167-179

Congener-specific analyses of 7 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), 10 polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and 4 non-ortho (coplanar) polychlorinated biphenyls (cPCBs) were performed on 197 ... [more ▼]

Congener-specific analyses of 7 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), 10 polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and 4 non-ortho (coplanar) polychlorinated biphenyls (cPCBs) were performed on 197 foodstuffs samples of animal origin from Belgium during years 2000 and 2001. All investigated matrices (except horse) present background levels lower than the Belgian non-commercialization value of 5 pg TEQ/g fat. Pork was the meat containing the lowest concentration of both PCDD/Fs and cPCBs. The mean background concentration of 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxicity equivalent in milk was 1.1 pg/g of fat, with a congener distribution typical of non-contaminated milk. The relative contribution of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, 2,3,7,8-TCDF, 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF to the PCDD/Fs TEQ was 85 +/- 7.9% for all investigated matrices. The cPCBs contribution to the total TEQ was 47 +/- 19.0% for products of terrestrial species and 69 +/- 20.0% for aquatic species. Once the contribution of cPCBs was added to the TEQ, few foodstuffs such as horse, sheep, beef, eggs and cheese presented levels above the future European guidelines that currently only include PCDD/Fs but will be re-evaluated later in order to include 'dioxin-like' PCBs. Based on levels measured in the samples, the estimation of the dietary intake was 65.3 pg WHO-TEQ/day for PCDD/Fs only (1.00 pg WHO-TEQ/kg bw/day, for a 65 kg person) and 132.9 pg WHO-TEQ/day if cPCBs were included (2.04 pg WHO-TEQ/kg bw/day, for a 65 kg person). Meat (mainly beef), dairy products, and fish each account for roughly one third of the intake. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPCDD/F and non-ortho PCB body burden of the general population in Wallonia, Belgium: impact of different sources of environmental pollution
Fierens, S.; Mairesse, Hélène; Focant, Jean-François ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2002), 55

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See detailClean-up and determination of Organochlorine and Organobromine Compounds
Pirard, Catherine; Douny, Caroline ULg; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2002)

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See detailComparison of HRGC-MS/MS and HRGC-HRMS results on environmental and food samples in some European laboraratories
Helen, Céline; Marchand, Philippe; Laplanche, Alain et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2002)

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