References of "Eppe, Gauthier"
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See detailDioxin analysis in feed: cell-based assay versus mass spectrometry method
Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg; Rybertt, Soledad; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Accreditation and Quality Assurance (2006), 11(1-2), 38-43

In the determination of contaminants (dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, polyaromatic hydrocarbons), cell-based assays are useful methods for screening purposes: they are mainly characterized by high ... [more ▼]

In the determination of contaminants (dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, polyaromatic hydrocarbons), cell-based assays are useful methods for screening purposes: they are mainly characterized by high sample throughput and lower costs than the Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based methods. Although cell-based assays can be sensitive enough for the determination of dioxins and related substances in agreement with the presently tolerable limits in food and feed (Regulation No. 2375/2001/EC and Directive 2003/57/EC respectively), their lack of specificity make their use rather questionable in control laboratories. In this paper, we present and compare results obtained from the analysis of a limited number of feed samples by both gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) and cell-based assay (DR-CALUX: dioxin responsive-chemically activated luciferase gene expression) methods. The DR-CALUX screening led to less than 10% false non-compliant and no false compliant results. In addition, there is a good correlation between GC-HRMS and DR-CALUX data. However, these preliminary results have to be confirmed on a larger number of samples to demonstrate that total toxic equivalent (TEQ), including dioxins, furans and dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) can be monitored in feed and food with a cell-based assay. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh-Resolution GC Coupled to High-Resolution MS in the Analysis of Dioxins and Related Substances, Principles and Applications
Eppe, Gauthier ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg; Focant, Jean-François ULg

in Niessen, W. M. A. (Ed.) The Encyclopedia of Mass Spectrometry, Volume 8, Hyphenated Methods (2006)

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See detailREMOVAL OF PCDD/FS AND DL-PCBS FROM FISH OILS BY VOLATILISATION PROCEDURES
Carbonnelle, Sophie; Eppe, Gauthier ULg; Hellebosch, L. et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2006)

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See detailRemoval of dioxins and PCB from fish oil by activated carbon and its influence on the nutritional quality of the oil
Maes, Jeroen; De Meulenaer, B.; Van Heerswynghels, P. et al

in Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society (2005), 82(8), 593-597

Fish oils are well-known sources of nutritionally valuable components such as the n-3 FA EPA and DHA as well as the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, and E. However, some fish oils can be contaminated with ... [more ▼]

Fish oils are well-known sources of nutritionally valuable components such as the n-3 FA EPA and DHA as well as the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, and E. However, some fish oils can be contaminated with considerable amounts of dioxins and dioxin-like PCB. The most important challenge during fish oil refining is to remove these contaminants without altering the levels of nutritionally valuable compounds and the oxidative status and stability of the oil. Treatment with an apolar adsorbent, e.g., activated carbon (AC), seems to be the most efficient process today. Very little information about the adsorption of different dioxin and PCB congeners is available. Four grades of AC were evaluated for their efficiency in removing these compounds. In addition, the effects of the treatment on the nutritional and oxidative quality of the oil were evaluated. After treatment of contaminated cod liver oil [5.4 ppt toxic equivalents (TEQ) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F), 18.1 ppt TEQ dioxin-like PCB] with 0.5% AC, almost all PCDD/F and up to 80% of the dioxin-like PCB could be removed. AC showed low affinity for mono-ortho PCB (< 30% removal), which could be explained by their noncoplanar structure. Removal efficiencies were dependent on the grade and percentage of AC used. The treatment of contaminated cod liver oil caused no important effects on oil quality or FA composition in the conditions tested. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental and human impact of an old-timer incinerator in terms of dioxin and PCB level: A case study
Pirard, Catherine; Eppe, Gauthier ULg; Massart, Anne-Cécile ULg et al

in Environmental Science & Technology (2005), 39(13), 4721-4728

The impact of a recently closed old municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) on polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (POD), polychlorodibenzofuran (PCDF), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels in the ... [more ▼]

The impact of a recently closed old municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) on polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (POD), polychlorodibenzofuran (PCDF), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels in the surrounding environment and resident serum has been studied in a small rural area of France. Studied soils and eggs from chickens foraging on these soils were sampled in the vicinity of the MSWI under the prevailing wind stream, while comparison samples were collected outside the assumed impact zone. PCB levels observed in soils and eggs did not differ statistically from comparison sites. This confirmed the low impact of MSWI PCB emission on environmental media, compared to other well-known sources. PCDD/PCDF levels in soils and eggs were significantly higher than in comparison samples, pointing out the impact of MSWI emission on the surrounding environment. The high dioxin concentrations in eggs set aside for private consumption would increase the dioxin intake for the studied population. Blood specimens of 10 nonoccupationally exposed volunteers who had lived within a 2 km radius of the incinerator for at least 25 years have been analyzed. When adjusted for age, PCB and PCDD/F blood levels were higher than general European populations and comparable to a similarly exposed Belgian population. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation and interpretation of CALUX as a tool for the estimation of dioxin-like activity in marine biological matrixes.
Windal, Isabelle; Van Wouwe, Nathalie; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Environmental Science & Technology (2005), 39(6), 1741-1748

Among the different analytical tools proposed as an alternative to the very expensive gas chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) analyses of polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and ... [more ▼]

Among the different analytical tools proposed as an alternative to the very expensive gas chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) analyses of polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorodibenzofurans, Chemically Activated LUciferase gene eXpression (CALUX) in vitro cell bioassay is very promising. It allows the analyses of a high number of samples since it is relatively fast, inexpensive, and sensitive. However, this technique is not yet widely applied for screening or environmental monitoring. The main reasons are probably the lack of validation and the difficulty in interpreting the global biological response of the bioassay. In this paper, the strict quality control criteria set up for the validation of CALUX are described. The validation has shown good repeatability (relative standard deviation (RSD) = 9%) and good within-lab reproducibility (RSD = 15%) of the results. The quantification limit, in the conditions applied in this paper, is 1.25 pg CALUX-TEQ/g fat. Comparison of CALUX and GC-HRMS analysis was made for various marine matrixes (fishes, mussels, starfishes, sea birds, and marine mammals). Good correlations are usually observed, but there are systematic differences between the results. Attempts are made to identify the origin of the discrepancy between the two methods. [less ▲]

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See detailRecent advances in mass spectrometric measurement of dioxins
Focant, Jean-François ULg; Pirard, Catherine; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Journal of Chromatography. A (2005), 1067(1-2), 265-275

Past years, many efforts have been dedicated to the development of alternative analytical methods for the measurement of dioxins in various types of matrices. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs ... [more ▼]

Past years, many efforts have been dedicated to the development of alternative analytical methods for the measurement of dioxins in various types of matrices. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are compounds that are present in samples at part-per-billion (ppb) or part-per-trillion (ppt) level. Their measurement requires the use of very sensitive analytical methods. Gas chromatography (GC) coupled to quadrupole ion storage mass spectrometry (QISTMS), fast GC (FGC) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) coupled to TOFMS are the more promising tools challenging the reference GC high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) based on sector instruments. We report herein some of the advances we achieved in the past years in our laboratory on the development of alternative measurement methods for those compounds. (c) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailGender dependent accumulation of dioxins in smokers
Fierens, S.; Eppe, Gauthier ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

in Occupational and Environmental Medicine (2005), 62(1), 61-62

Aims: To evaluate the contribution of tobacco smoking to dioxin accumulation. Methods: Dioxin (17 PCDD/F) concentrations in fasting blood from 251 subjects ( 161 never smokers, 54 past smokers, and 36 ... [more ▼]

Aims: To evaluate the contribution of tobacco smoking to dioxin accumulation. Methods: Dioxin (17 PCDD/F) concentrations in fasting blood from 251 subjects ( 161 never smokers, 54 past smokers, and 36 current smokers) were quantified. Results: Whereas serum dioxin concentrations of male smokers were on average 40% higher than those of nonsmokers, in women, smoking was associated with significantly lower serum dioxin levels. A synergistic potentiation of dioxin metabolism by tobacco smoke in women is postulated to explain these paradoxical findings. Conclusions: Current smoking is associated with gender dependent effects on dioxin body burden and is a potential source of confounding in human studies using blood dioxins as indicators of exposure. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the DR-CALUX screening of food and feed, according to regulation levels including DL-PCB
Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg; Rybertt, Soledad; Focant, Jean-François ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2005), 67

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See detailComprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with isotope dilution time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the measurement of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls in foodstuffs - Comparison with other methods
Focant, Jean-François ULg; Eppe, Gauthier ULg; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg et al

in Journal of Chromatography. A (2005), 1086(1-2), 45-60

A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC-TOF-MS) experimental setup was tested for the measurement of seven 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzo ... [more ▼]

A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC-TOF-MS) experimental setup was tested for the measurement of seven 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), ten 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), four non-ortho-polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), eight mono-ortho-PCBs, and six indicator PCBs (Aroclor 1260) in foodstuff samples. A 40 m RTX-500 (0.18 mm I.D., 0.10 mu m df) was used as the first dimension (D-1) and a 1.5 nn BPX-50 (0.10 mm I.D., 0.10 mu m df) as the second dimension (2 D). The GC x GC chromatographic separation was completed in 45 min. Quantification was performed using C-13-label isotope dilution (11)). Isotope ratios of the selected quantification ions were checked against theoretical values prior to peak assignment and quantification. The dynamic working range spanned three orders of magnitude. The lowest detectable amount of 2,3,7,8-TCDD was 0.2 pg. Fish, pork, and milk samples were considered. On a congener basis, the GC x GC-ID-TOF-MS method was compared to the reference GC-ID high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) method and to the alternative GC-ID tandem-in-time quadrupole ion storage mass spectrometry (QIST-MS/MS). PCB levels ranged from low picogram (pg) to low nanogram (ng) per gram of sample and data compared very well between the different methods. For all matrices, PCDD/Fs were at a low pg level (0.05-3 pg) on a fresh weight basis. Although congener profiles were accurately described, RSDs of GC x GC-ID-TOF-MS and GC-QIST-MS/MS were much higher than for GC-ID-HRMS, especially for low level pork and milk. On a toxic equivalent (TEQ) basis, all methods, including the dioxin-responsive chemically activated luciferase gene expression (DR-CALUX) assay, produced similar responses. A cost comparison is also presented. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPerformance of GC-LRMS/MS and GCxGC methods for compliance monitoring of the PCDD/F-TEQ and the total TEQ in food and feed
Van Cleuvenbergen, Rudy; Santos, Javier; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2005), 67

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See detailRemoval of PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs from fish oil by activated carbon: Compliance with European Legislation
Eppe, Gauthier ULg; Carbonnelle, Sophie; Hellebosch, Laeticia et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2005), 67

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