References of "Doucet, Jean-Louis"
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See detailLa pratique des inventaires multi-ressources dans les forêts communautaires, ou comment rendre la foresterie communautaire inaccessible aux villageois
Meunier, Quentin; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Boldrini, Sylvie et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

Des inventaires trop complexes imposés aux populations locales risquent de freiner considérablement l'appropriation des futures forêts communautaires gabonaises. La présente fiche technique compare les ... [more ▼]

Des inventaires trop complexes imposés aux populations locales risquent de freiner considérablement l'appropriation des futures forêts communautaires gabonaises. La présente fiche technique compare les avantages et inconvénients des inventaires par poches, des inventaires d'exploitation habituellement réalisés dans les Forêts Communautaires camerounaises et une approche plus simple par normes proposée par l'équipe rédactionnelle. [less ▲]

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See detailThe abundance of charcoal fragments emphasizes the assumption of huge palaeofires in the mixed moist semi-evergreen rainforest of the northern republic of Congo
Gillet, Jean-François ULg; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg

in Damblon, Freddy (Ed.) Proceedings of the Fourth International Meeting of Anthracology (2013)

In this paper, we study the origins of the northern Congo Republic rainforests. Macroscopic charcoal fragments were systematically recorded through auger investigations and pits observations in four ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we study the origins of the northern Congo Republic rainforests. Macroscopic charcoal fragments were systematically recorded through auger investigations and pits observations in four forest types: the open canopy Marantaceae forest, the dense forest with Marantaceae, the Gilbertiodendron dewevrei forest and the Triplochiton scleroxylon forest. In addition, the charred Elaies guineensis seeds were distinguished from the other charcoals in the pits. Ten selected charcoals, including charred E. guineensis seeds, were dated by AMS. Abundance of charcoal fragments in the soils at various depths indicated several episodes of fires in the region. A dryer climatic phase, between 2320 and 1330 BP, associated with a large scale human occupation related to the important harvesting of oil palm nuts, could explain the widespread Marantaceae forests. Recent slash-and-burn shifting cultivation, c. 200 BP, would allow T. scleroxylon installation. Implications for forest management are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant-animal mutualistic interaction: the case of the Uapaca trees and the western lowland gorilla (G. g. gorilla)
Petre, Charles-Albert ULg; Tagg, Nikki; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

in Primate Tidings (2012), 27

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See detailRegards croisés sur la foresterie communautaire : l'expérience camerounaise
Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; De Vleeschouwer, Jean-Yves ULg et al

Book published by Presses Agronomiques de Gembloux (2012)

Le Cameroun est le pays pionnier de la foresterie communautaire en Afrique centrale. En promulguant, en 1994, une loi autorisant les communautés locales à gérer elles-mêmes leurs forêts, l’Etat ... [more ▼]

Le Cameroun est le pays pionnier de la foresterie communautaire en Afrique centrale. En promulguant, en 1994, une loi autorisant les communautés locales à gérer elles-mêmes leurs forêts, l’Etat s’engageait dans un long processus de décentralisation. L’asbl Nature +, l’ONG SNV et Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech (Université de Liège) furent parmi les premiers acteurs à accompagner les communautés rurales dans leurs démarches d’auto-gestion. En 2010, ces trois organisations, grâce à un financement du Fonds des Forêts du Bassin du Congo, ont mis en commun leurs expériences au sein du projet « Partenariats pour le Développement des Forêts Communautaires ». Ce projet a appuyé le développement technique, institutionnel et organisationnel de regroupements de forêts communautaires dans trois zones (Ngambé Tikar, Lomié et Ebolowa). Visant le renforcement des capacités selon le principe de « l’apprentissage par l’action encadrée », le projet a permis de rendre les associations locales davantage autonomes. Ce livre nous fait découvrir le quotidien des forêts communautaires dont il expose sans ambages les forces et les faiblesses. Richement illustré, il prend le pari que la beauté des images suscitera intérêt et questionnement. [less ▲]

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See detailEcology of Pericopsis elata (Fabaceae), a Timber Species Considered as Endangered, in Southeastern Cameroon
Bourland, Nils ULg; Kouadio, Yao Lambert; Lejeune, Philippe ULg et al

in Biotropica (2012), 44(6), 840-847

Pericopsis elata (Fabaceae) is a tall tree of high commercial value of the moist semi-deciduous African forests. As a result of logging which started decades ago, it is considered as threatened and ... [more ▼]

Pericopsis elata (Fabaceae) is a tall tree of high commercial value of the moist semi-deciduous African forests. As a result of logging which started decades ago, it is considered as threatened and included on both IUCN Red List and CITES Appendix II even though essential biological parameters controlling its population dynamics remain unknown. This study aims at improving the knowledge of the species ecological parameters and at assessing the impact of selective logging on its populations in an 118,052 ha forest in Cameroon. After inventorying the species in 1,432 ha, mortality and growth were assessed over continuous 5- and 2-year periods in unlogged and logged areas, respectively. Phenology was monitored in the unlogged forest during 5 years. The population structure followed a bell-shaped curve. Mean annual diameter increments in both environments did not differ significantly between unlogged and logged areas. P. elata is a deciduous species that flowers at the end of the main dry season. The minimum reproduction and effective flowering diameters were, respectively, 32 and 37 cm. Fruit maturation took place during 7 months. With a minimum logging diameter of 90 cm, the recovery rate computed over a 30-year period was greater than 100%. Selective logging harvested only 12.1% of the total number of seed trees and had little influence on the species biological parameters. Securing sufficient regeneration as a post-logging action is probably the most important consideration for achieving long-term sustainability. Implications for the conservation status of the species are discussed at the regional level. [less ▲]

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See detailLes équations allométriques pantropicales sont-elles valides en Afrique centrale
Fayolle, Adeline ULg; Ernst, Gaëtan; Bouissou, Christina et al

Scientific conference (2012, October 24)

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See detailDynamique forestière et enrichissements forestiers. Site de Mbang. Rapport n° 9.
Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg; Amandé, Jean; Bracke, Charles et al

Report (2012)

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See detailInteractions between western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla Savage & Wyman 1847) and timber exploitation: Preliminary insights in a Gabonese logging concession
Haurez, Barbara ULg; Petre, Charles-Albert ULg; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg

Poster (2012, August 15)

Interactions between western lowland gorillas (WLG) and a timber exploitation were studied in Central Gabon. WLG densities were estimated in two sites with different logging histories (not logged vs ... [more ▼]

Interactions between western lowland gorillas (WLG) and a timber exploitation were studied in Central Gabon. WLG densities were estimated in two sites with different logging histories (not logged vs. logged one month before), and nesting behavior was described. Seeds dispersed by WLG were identified through fecal analysis and germination trials assessed seed viability after gut passage. Four treatments were realized for the most abundant species: passed seeds, passed seeds in fecal matrix, seeds surrounded by fresh pulp and seeds extracted from fresh fruits. Relatively high WLG densities were observed in the concession (3.7 weaned gorillas/km² in unlogged forest and 1.7 weaned gorillas/km² in logged forest). WLG nested preferentially in open areas (particularly open terra firme and swamp forest) and frequently used old logging road network for nesting and feeding. WLG dispersed sixteen species during the course of the study (February-May 2011). The most dispersed species was Santiria trimera (Burseraceae). The germination successes of S. trimera were significantly higher after gut passage (N=378; P<0.001) because of pulp removal and seed coat scarification. This pilot study suggests that timber exploitation and WLG conservation are not mutually exclusive. WLG are important agents of forest regeneration by dispersing seeds in logged areas. Nest sites in logging gaps could be particularly favorable for seedlings development. This consideration must encourage forest managers to strengthen WLG-conservative practices in their concessions. [less ▲]

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See detailGeological Substrates Shape Tree Species and Trait Distributions in African Moist Forests
Fayolle, Adeline ULg; Engelbrecht, Bettina; Freycon, Vincent et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(8), 1-10

Background: Understanding the factors that shape the distribution of tropical tree species at large scales is a central issue in ecology, conservation and forest management. The aims of this study were to ... [more ▼]

Background: Understanding the factors that shape the distribution of tropical tree species at large scales is a central issue in ecology, conservation and forest management. The aims of this study were to (i) assess the importance of environmental factors relative to historical factors for tree species distributions in the semi-evergreen forests of the northern Congo basin; and to (ii) identify potential mechanisms explaining distribution patterns through a trait-based approach. Methodology/Principal Findings: We analyzed the distribution patterns of 31 common tree species in an area of more than 700,000 km² spanning the borders of Cameroon, the Central African Republic, and the Republic of Congo using forest inventory data from 56,445 0.5-ha plots. Spatial variation of environmental (climate, topography and geology) and historical factors (human disturbance) were quantified from maps and satellite records. Four key functional traits (leaf phenology, shade tolerance, wood density, and maximum growth rate) were extracted from the literature. The geological substrate was of major importance for the distribution of the focal species, while climate and past human disturbances had a significant but lesser impact. Species distribution patterns were significantly related to functional traits. Species associated with sandy soils typical of sandstone and alluvium were characterized by slow growth rates, shade tolerance, evergreen leaves, and high wood density, traits allowing persistence on resource-poor soils. In contrast, fast-growing pioneer species rarely occurred on sandy soils, except for Lophira alata. Conclusions/Significance: The results indicate strong environmental filtering due to differential soil resource availability across geological substrates. Additionally, long-term human disturbances in resource-rich areas may have accentuated the observed patterns of species and trait distributions. Trait differences across geological substrates imply pronounced differences in population and ecosystem processes, and call for different conservation and management strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of new radiocarbon dates to track the impact of past anthropogenic disturbances on current vegetation in Central Africa
Morin-Rivat, Julie ULg; Gillet, Jean-François ULg; Bourland, Nils ULg et al

Poster (2012, July)

Introduction: Understanding current Central Africa vegetation patterns faces the scarcity of data about their past evolution. However, a growing hypothesis suggests that past human activities could have ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Understanding current Central Africa vegetation patterns faces the scarcity of data about their past evolution. However, a growing hypothesis suggests that past human activities could have had a substantial influence on vegetation (Van Gemerden et al. 2003, Brncic et al. 2009). Indeed, by creating large openings (fig. 1), they might have triggered the expansion of light-demanding species currently suffering from a lack of regeneration. This lack of saplings could have been caused by the change in land use since colonization with the sedentarization of shifting cultivators. Aim of the study: To investigate the potential relationship between past anthropogenic disturbances and present vegetation. Material & methods: Fieldworks combining anthracological and ecological approaches have been undertaken in Northern Congo and South-Eastern Cameroon (fig. 2). We excavated thirty 150-200 cm deep pits under different forest covers and vegetation types to identify evidences of past human presence (i.e potsherds, fig. 3, slags from metallurgy, anthropogenic pieces of charcoals and anthropophilous charred seeds). Charcoals and seeds (oil palm Elaeis guineensis, fig. 4, Canarium schweinfurthii) in combination with artifacts have been dated. Results: A set of 38 new radiocarbon dates ranging from 15,200 cal BP to present time have been obtained. They confirm the existence of important past fire events in a region where natural ones seldom occur. Together with artifacts, our findings support the few already available dates documenting evidences of past human activities in Central African rainforests. On the 36 most recent dates (fig. 5), the majority belongs to the 2,300-1,400 cal BP period (61%). The whole semi-deciduous forest zone is concerned by this period of intense disturbances with a high rate of fragmentation. It follows the last great arid phase ca. 2,500 cal BP and might be linked to the iron workers expansion. Another pool of dates between 650 and 250 cal BP (33%) associated with potsherds might be correlated to a dry phase contemporary to the Little Ice Age in Europe. That last group of dates points out the potential positive impact of anthropogenic disturbances connected to a dry climatic event on light-demanding species populations. Indeed, this is consistent with the fact that most of current light-demanding trees have a higher number of stems around 100 cm dbh. Conclusion: Our multidisciplinary approach allowed new insights into the link between human history and vegetation dynamics in Central Africa. Further investigations should be conducted to go deeper into the understanding of the evolution of Central African rainforests and to improve the management of currently logged light-demanding species resulting from the LIA period. Thirty new dates from sixteen soil profiles are forthcoming. References: Brncic T., Willis M., K. J., Harris D. J., Telfer M. W. & Bailey M. W. 2009. Fire and climate change impacts on lowland forest composition in northern Congo during the last 2580 years from palaeoecological analyses of a seasonally flooded swamp. The Holocene, 19, 79-89. Reimer P. J., Baillie M. G. L., Bard E., Bayliss A., Beck J. W., Blackwell P. G., Bronk Ramsey C., Buck C. E., Burr G. S., Edwards R. L., Friedrich M., Grootes P. M., Guilderson T. P., Hajdas I., Heaton T. J., Hogg A. G., Hughen K. A., Kaiser K. F., Kromer B., McCormac F. G., Manning S. W., Reimer R. W., Richards D. A., Southon J.R., Talamo S., Turney C. S. M., van der Plicht J., & Weyhenmeyer, C. E. 2009. IntCal09 and Marine09 radiocarbon age calibration curves, 0-50,000 years cal BP. Radiocarbon, 51(4), 1111-1150. Van Gemerden B. S., Olff H., Parren M. P. E, Bongers F. 2003. The pristine rain forest? Remnants of historical human impacts on current tree species composition and diversity. Journal of Biogeography, 30, 1381-1390. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring ancient charcoal archives in Central Africa
Hubau, Wannes; Morin-Rivat, Julie ULg; Van den Bulcke, Jan et al

Conference (2012, July)

Fossil pollen and charcoal fragments are preserved in lake sediments, in forest soils and in ancient human settlements, were they can be accompanied by artifacts. As such, vegetation history is remarkably ... [more ▼]

Fossil pollen and charcoal fragments are preserved in lake sediments, in forest soils and in ancient human settlements, were they can be accompanied by artifacts. As such, vegetation history is remarkably well archived and sometimes closely linked to cultural history. Direct evidence for Central African vegetation history has been mainly derived from pollen analysis, while the charcoal archive remains hardly explored. However, analysis of charred wood remains has proven worthwhile for palaeovegetation reconstructions in temperate and arid regions. One of the main challenges for charcoal identification in tropical regions is species diversity. Therefore we developed and present a transparent charcoal identification protocol within an umbrella database of species names and metadata, compiled from the on-line database of wood-anatomical descriptions (InsideWood), the database of the world’s largest reference collection of Central African wood specimens (RMCA, Tervuren, Belgium) and inventory and indicator species lists. We applied the protocol on radiocarbon dated charcoal collections sampled in the Mayumbe forest (Bas-Congo, DRCongo), in human settlements along the Aruwimi and Lomami rivers (Province Orientale, DRCongo), along the Sangha river (Sangha department, Republic of the Congo) and in Pallisco logging concessions (East Province of Cameroon). First charcoal identification results are promising and sometimes seem to be taxonomically more precise than pollen identification. However, next to opportunities, we also present some pitfalls when exploring ancient charcoal archives. [less ▲]

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See detailForest anomalies and human occupation in Central Africa during the last two millennia
Livingstone Smith, Alexandre; Beeckman, Hans; Cerisier, François et al

Conference (2012, June 23)

Central African rainforests are no longer considered as pristine, but as the outcome of a long history of changes due mainly to climatic variation. For the later part of the Holocene it has been ... [more ▼]

Central African rainforests are no longer considered as pristine, but as the outcome of a long history of changes due mainly to climatic variation. For the later part of the Holocene it has been hypothesised that climate changes together with human activities triggered modifications in terms of distribution and botanical composition. While developing a research project to explore the mechanisms of forest change, new research avenues for the archaeology of rainforests became apparent. In this paper, we outline the results of this approach, implemented on a forest concession (Cameroon). We introduce our methodology based on the analysis of botanical inventories (focused on large trees of human linked species and light demanding species), coupled to systematic core boring and test pits. A sampling strategy for the collection of charcoal and its identification is developed and archaeological remains found in association are analyzed at the Royal Museum for Central Africa. [less ▲]

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