References of "Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRecommendations for the registration of agents for prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: an update from the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science.
Compston, J.; Reid, D. M.; Boisdron, J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2008), 19(9), 1247-50

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailManagement of patients with Paget's disease: a consensus document of the Belgian Bone Club.
Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Bergmann, Pierre; Body, Jean-Jacques et al

in Osteoporosis International (2008), 19(8), 1109-17

Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a potentially crippling condition. Pain, fracture, spinal stenosis, nerve entrapment, vascular steal syndrome, secondary osteoarthritis, bone deformity, dental problems ... [more ▼]

Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a potentially crippling condition. Pain, fracture, spinal stenosis, nerve entrapment, vascular steal syndrome, secondary osteoarthritis, bone deformity, dental problems, deafness, excessive bleeding during orthopaedic surgery, rare sarcomatous degeneration, and hypercalcaemia constitute complications that may impair the quality of life. The therapeutic approach varies from symptomatic (analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs) to more specific drugs such as increasingly potent bisphosphonates. Studies such as the PRISM study should in the future help to determine the superiority or not of aggressive treatment over symptomatic treatment in the prevention of complications. Various oral and/or intravenous (i.v.) bisphosphonates have been tested and are currently on the market. The most recently available nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, i.v. zoledronic acid, is the most potent therapy available for the treatment of PDB. Its therapeutic efficacy, its long-term effect on biologic activity and its good tolerance currently supports its use as a first-line therapeutic option in patients suffering from PDB. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of strontium ranelate on radiographic spinal osteoarthritis progression
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delferriere, Danielle; Roux, Christian et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2007, September), 56(number 9 (suppl.)), 315

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailManagement of cancer treatment-induced bone loss in early breast and prostate cancer -- a consensus paper of the Belgian Bone Club.
Body, Jean-Jacques; Bergmann, P.; Boonen, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2007), 18(11), 1439-50

Cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL) is one of the most important side effects of adjuvant antineoplastic treatment in hormone-dependent neoplasms. Chemotherapy, GnRH analogs and tamoxifen can ... [more ▼]

Cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL) is one of the most important side effects of adjuvant antineoplastic treatment in hormone-dependent neoplasms. Chemotherapy, GnRH analogs and tamoxifen can induce marked bone loss in premenopausal women with early breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are replacing tamoxifen as the preferred treatment for postmenopausal women. As a class effect, steroidal (exemestane) and non-steroidal (anastrozole and letrozole) AIs increase bone turnover and cause bone loss (4%-5% over 2 years). When compared to tamoxifen, the risk of getting a clinical fracture under AI treatment is increased by 35%-50%. In patients with prostate cancer, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) increases bone turnover, reduces bone mass (4%-5% per year) and increases the fracture rate depending on the duration of therapy. Zoledronic acid can prevent accelerated bone loss induced by goserelin in premenopausal women, by letrozole in postmenopausal women and by ADT in men. More limited data indicate that weekly alendronate or risedronate could also be effective for preventing CTIBL. Initiation of therapy early, prior to the occurrence of severe osteoporosis, rather than after, may be more effective. Bisphosphonate treatment should be considered in osteoporotic but also in osteopenic patients if other risk factor(s) for fractures are present. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIncrease in femoral neck bone mineral density is associated with decrease in hip fracture incidence during treatment with strontium ranelate
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delmas, Pierre D; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2006, November), 54(Suppl), 586

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRelations between increase in femoral neck bone mineral density and decrease in hip fracture incidence during treatment with strontium ranelate
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delmas, Pierre D; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006, March), 17(Suppl.1), 96

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDXA-based assessment of male patients using standardized bone density values and a national reference database
Goemaere, S.; Vanderschueren, D.; Kaufman, Jean-Marc et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006, March), 17(Suppl.1), 54

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBelgian bone specialists are eagerly looking to the availability of new medications in osteoporosis
Goemaere, S.; Bergmann, P.; Body, J. J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006, March), 17(Suppl.1), 27

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTotal joint replacement of hip or knee as an outcome measure for structure modifying trials in osteoarthritis
Altman, R. D.; Abadie, Eric ULg; Avouac, B. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 10

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRecommendations for the registration of agents to be used in the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: updated recommendations from the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science.
Abadie, Eric ULg; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Ringe, Johann D. et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2005), 35(1), 1-4

OBJECTIVES: The Group for the Respect and Excellence in Science (GREES) has reviewed and updated their recommendations for clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new chemical entities to ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The Group for the Respect and Excellence in Science (GREES) has reviewed and updated their recommendations for clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new chemical entities to be used in the treatment and prevention of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP). METHODS: Consensus discussion of the committee. RESULTS: With the exception of steroid use posttransplantation, there is no need to differentiate between underlying diseases. Prevention and treatment for GIOP are dependent on exposure to glucocorticoids rather than T-scores as in postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). If fracture data are obtained for PMO, it need not be repeated for GIOP, relying instead on bone mineral density (BMD) trials of at least 1 year. GREES recommends several changes in the previous guidance for GIOP. The committee saw no need to repeat preclinical studies if those have been previously done to assure bone quality in PMO. Similarly, phase I and phase II trials, if careful dose selection has been done for PMO, should not be repeated. The "prevention" and "treatment" claims should remain. Since the most recent evidence suggests significant increase in fracture risk for daily doses of prednisone of 5 mg/day or equivalent, clinical trials should concentrate on patients receiving at least this daily dosage. The emergence of bisphosphonates as the reference treatment, together with the rapid bone loss and high fracture incidence in glucocorticoid users, necessitates recommending a noninferiority trial design with lumbar spine BMD as the primary endpoint after 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: Registration of new chemical entities to be used in the management of GIOP should be granted, based on a 1-year noninferiority trial, using BMD as primary outcome and alendronate or risedronate as comparator. Demonstration of antifracture efficacy should have been previously demonstrated in PMO. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTraitement de l'osteoporose postmenopausique en 2004
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2004), 59(11), 633-47

Major improvements have been observed, during the last ten years, in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The most significant benefits have been obtained through the availability of new ... [more ▼]

Major improvements have been observed, during the last ten years, in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The most significant benefits have been obtained through the availability of new medications which have demonstrated their anti-fracture efficacy in the course of well conducted, scientifically sound studies. Due to the pharmacological properties of these new medications, treatment of osteoporosis can now be tailored to the needs of each and every single postmenopausal woman. Calcium supplementation (500 mg/day) should be offered to all post menopausal women unless dietary records show a sufficient intake. On the grounds of the high prevalence of low serum vitamin D levels in the ederly Belgian population, the systematic use of a calcium-vitamin D combination, after the age of 65 years, appears to be justified. Raloxifene is an interesting option for women with low mineral density or prevalent vertebral fractures. This molecule has demonstrated unequivocal anti-fracture efficacy at the level of the spine and is also caracterized by a beneficial effect on non-spinal fractures, in high risk women. Bisphosphonates (alendronate and risedronate) have shown the anti-fracture efficacy at the level of the axial and appendicular skeleton. The availability of a weekly formulation improves their compliance, notwithstanding the constrains related to the potential upper gastro-intestinal toxicity of these compounds. Bisphosphonates appear to be the first-line choice for patients with more severe osteoporosis and high risk to develop hip fractures. Teriparatide (1-34 Fragment of parathyroid hormone) is a new pharmacological option, oriented, mainly if not exclusively because of its parenteral administration and high cost, to patients with severe osteoporosis (low bone density and prevalent vertebral fracture(s). Strontium ranelate offers an anti-fracture efficacy at all skeleton sites and an oustanding overall tolerance and may play a main role in the future management of osteoporosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStrontium ranelate reduces the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures in Caucasian women with postmenopausal osteoporosis
Adami, Silvio; Meunier, Pierre J; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre et al

in Osteoporosis International (2004, May), 15(Suppl.1), 93-94

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRecommendations for the use of new methods to assess the efficacy of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of osteoarthritis
Abadie, Eric ULg; Ethgen, Dominique ULg; Avouac, Bernard ULg et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2004), 12(4), 263-268

Background: Recent innovations in the pharmaceutical drug discovery environment have generated new chemical entities with the potential to become disease modifying drugs for osteoarthritis (DMOAD's ... [more ▼]

Background: Recent innovations in the pharmaceutical drug discovery environment have generated new chemical entities with the potential to become disease modifying drugs for osteoarthritis (DMOAD's). Regulatory agencies acknowledge that such compounds may be granted a DMOAD indication, providing they demonstrate that they can slow down disease progression; progression would be calibrated by a surrogate for structural change, by measuring joint space narrowing (JSN) on plain X-rays with the caveat that this delayed JSN translate into a clinical benefit for the patient. Recently, new technology has been developed to detect a structural change of the OA joint earlier than conventional X-rays. Objective: The Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES) organized a working party to assess whether these new technologies may be used as surrogates to plain x-rays for assessment of DMOADs. Methods: GREES includes academic scientists, members of regulatory authorities and representatives from the pharmaceutical industry. After an extensive search of the international literature, from 1980 to 2002, two experts meetings were organized to prepare a resource document for regulatory authorities. This document includes recommendations for a possible update of guidelines for the registration of new chemical entities in osteoarthritis. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now used to measure parameters of cartilage morphology and integrity in OA patients. While some data are encouraging, correlation between short-term changes in cartilage structure observed with MRI and long-term radiographic or clinical changes are needed. Hence, the GREES suggests that MRI maybe used as an outcome in phase II studies, but that further data is needed before accepting MRI as a primary end-point in phase III clinical trials. Biochemical markers of bone and cartilage remodelling are being tested to predict OA and measure disease progression. Recently published data are promising but validation as surrogate end-points for OA disease progression requires additional study. The GREES suggests that biochemical markers remain limited to 'proof of concept' studies or as secondary end-points in phase II and III clinical trials. However, the GREES emphasizes the importance of acquiring additional information on biochemical markers in order to help better understand the mode of action of drugs to be used in OA. Regulatory agencies consider that evidence of improvement in clinical outcomes is critical for approval of DMOAD. Time to total joint replacement surgery is probably the most relevant clinical end-point for the evaluation of efficacy of a DMOAD. However, at this time, time to surgery can not be used in clinical trials because of bias by non disease-related factors like patient willingness for surgery or economic factors. At this stage, it appears that DMOAD should demonstrate a significant difference compared to placebo. Benefit should be measured by 3 co-primary end-points: JSN, pain and function. Secondary end-points should include the percentage of patients who are 'responder' (or 'failure'). The definition of a 'failure' patient would be someone with progression of JSN>0.5 mm over a period of 2-3 years or who has a significant worsening in pain and/or function, based on validated cut-off values. The definition of the clinically relevant cut-off points for pain and function must be based on data evaluating the natural history of the disease (epidemiological cohorts or placebo groups from long-term studies). These cut-offs points should reflect a high propensity, for an individual patient, to later require joint replacement. Conclusion: GREES has outlined a set of guidelines for the development of a DMOAD for OA. Although these guidelines are subject to change as new information becomes available, the information above is based on the present knowledge in the field with the addition of expert opinion. (C) 2004 OsteoArthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of proposals of Belgian Social Security Institute for reimbursement of bone densitometry tests. Toward a cost-effective strategy for osteoporosis screening?
Ben Sedrine, Wafa ULg; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre et al

in Aging Clinical & Experimental Research (2004), 16(5), 413-419

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The Belgian Social Security Institute (hereafter INAMI) proposes a list of conditions to be considered as a prerequisite for reimbursement of Bone Mineral Density (BMD) measurements ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The Belgian Social Security Institute (hereafter INAMI) proposes a list of conditions to be considered as a prerequisite for reimbursement of Bone Mineral Density (BMD) measurements. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the proposed criteria for identifying osteoporosis, and to gauge how useful they are for more rational application of densitometry tests. METHODS: 3748 Caucasian women aged at least 50 years old were recruited consecutively from an outpatient university center, from the database of which all relevant data corresponding to the INAMI list of clinical factors, as well as patients' age, weight and height, were collected. BMD measurements using dual X-ray absorptiometry were reported at the spine and hip regions. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated through measures of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV). Additionally, from ROC analysis, benchmark values for age and body mass index were identified and then, used alone and in combination with the INAMI test, were applied to define various screening strategies. For each of them, associated costs per osteoporotic patient detected were estimated. Cost estimates refer only to the costs associated with the densitometric procedure from the perspective of the reimbursement health authorities. RESULTS: Applying INAMI criteria for detecting osteoporosis at any of the considered sites yielded sensitivity of 68.9%, specificity of 50.7%, PPV of 42.9% and NPV of 57.3%. Comparison of incremental costs per patient of the different strategies revealed that, with 67.1 Euros, the option of opening BMD coverage to women on the basis of the INAMI conditions would be more cost-effective than mass screening (90.1 Euros) or applying the age criterion alone (70.2 Euros). However, the BMI condition seems to act as a better indicator of risk than the INAMI criteria in those meeting the age condition (35.4 Euros). CONCLUSIONS: The accuracy of the INAMI proposal turns out to be quite unsatisfactory, and did not adequately cover the population at risk of osteoporosis. From a resource allocation perspective, the best strategy by far would be to recommend using concomitantly INAMI, age and BMI-selective criteria. Some adaptations could enhance the usefulness of the INAMI proposals as a selective approach for BMD referral and reimbursement. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL'ostéodensitométrie
Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Ortho-Rhumato (2004), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDo new methods of investigation allow faster assessment of drugs efficacy in osteoarthritis?
Abadie, Eric ULg; Avouac, B.; Bouvenot, G. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2003, November), 14(Suppl. 7), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUncoupling of bone formation and resorption with a novel oral formulation of salmon calcitonin in postmenopausal women
Tanko, L. B.; Bagger, Y. Z.; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre et al

in Osteoporosis International (2003, November), 14(Suppl. 7), 4

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInhaled corticosteroids effects on bone in asthmatic and COPD patients: a quantitative systematic review
Richy, Florent; Bousquet, Jean; Ehrlich, George E et al

in Osteoporosis International (2003), 14(3), 179-190

Deleterious effect of oral corticosteroids on bone has been well documented, whereas this remains debated for inhaled ones (ICS). Our objectives were to analyze the effects of ICS on bone mineral density ... [more ▼]

Deleterious effect of oral corticosteroids on bone has been well documented, whereas this remains debated for inhaled ones (ICS). Our objectives were to analyze the effects of ICS on bone mineral density, fracture risk and bone markers. We performed an exhaustive systematic research of all controlled trials potentially containing pertinent data, peer-reviewed by a dedicated WHO expert group, and comprehensive meta-analyses of the data. Inclusion criteria were ICS, and BMD/markers/fractures in asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) and healthy patients. Analyses were performed in a conservative fashion using professional dedicated softwares and stratified by outcome, study design and ICS type. Results were expressed as standardized mean difference/effect size (ES), relative risk (RR) or odds ratio (OR), depending on study design and outcome units. Publication bias was investigated. Twenty-three trials were reviewed; 11 papers fit the inclusion criteria and were assessed for the main analysis. Quality scores for the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were 80%, 71% for the prospective cohort studies, and 78% for the retrospective cohort and cross-sectional studies. We globally assessed ICS effects on BMD and found deleterious effects: ES=0.61 (p=0.001) for healthy subjects, and ES=0.27 (p<0.001) for asthma/COPD patients. For these patients, this effect was 0.21 (p<0.01) at the lumbar spine, and 0.26 (p<0.001) at the hip or femoral neck. A single study evaluated the impact of ICS on hip fracture and reported an increased OR of 1.6 (1.24; 2.03). Lumbar fracture rate differences did not reach the level of statistical significance: 1.87 (0.5; 6.94). Osteocalcin and PICP were decreased and ICTP, pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline levels were not significantly affected. Budesonide (BUD) appeared to be the ICS inducing the less deleterious effects on bone, followed by beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) and triamcinolone (TRI). Publication bias investigation provided non-significant results. In our meta-analyses, BUD at a mean daily dose (SD) of 686 mug (158 mug), BDP at 703 mug (123 mug) and TRI at 1000 mug (282 mug) were found to affect bone mineral density and markers in patients suffering from the two major respiratory diseases. These findings could have practical implication in the long-term management of asthmatic and COPD patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (3 ULg)