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See detailImaging Guided Proteomics Unveils Heterogeniety in Colorectal Carcinoma Liver Metastases – Implications for Targeted Therapies.
blomme, Arnaud; Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Delvaux, David ULg et al

in Proceedings Giga Day 2012 (2012, May 04)

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See detailINTRA-TUMORAL HETEROGENEITY AND RATIONAL SELECTION OF ANTIGENS FOR TARGETED THERAPY OF LIVER METASTASES
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg; Delvaux, David ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8953

Objectives: Targeted therapies of liver metastases are gaining a major stake in current and future treatment options. However, the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Targeted therapies of liver metastases are gaining a major stake in current and future treatment options. However, the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer cells causing treatment resistance and relapse. Therefore, a rational strategy is needed to select targetable antigens that would overcome this intra-tumoral heterogeneity. Methods: After ethical committee approval, 48 fresh liver metastases of colorectal origin were prospectively collected from patients undergoing liver resection. Here we macroscopically divided the lesion in different zones and generated a unique quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in colorectal carcinoma liver metastases. Particular focus was laid on accessible proteins, a protein subclass comprising cell membrane associated and extracellular proteins. Accordingly, the tissues were ex-vivo biotinylated, affinity purified and analyzed for each zone separately using nano-UPLC-MSe proteomics technique. In total over 1500 unique proteins were statistically divided into different patterns of expression. Results: We have generated a quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in colorectal carcinoma liver metastases. The study offers insight into novel targets but also antigens against which the antibodies are already involved in clinical trials or treatment of liver metastases. Extensive clustering and validation experiments highlight novel markers that offer the potential to homogeneously cover the metastatic lesion and become better targets. Conclusions: Two such antigens, LTBP2 and TGFBI were selected for functional analysis in colorectal carcinoma cells. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that in particular TGFBI is relevant for migration and proliferation capacity of colorectal cancer cells. The suppression of this protein led to significant inhibition of tumor growth, crystalizing it as bona fide target for the development of anti-metastases therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailLiège experience in donation after cardiac death liver transplantation: 2003-2011
Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg; MONARD, Josée ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 6811

Objectives: Results of DCD-LT at the University Hospital of Liège were evaluated from 2003 to 2011. Methods: Medical records of 56 DCD liver recipients were retrospectively reviewed with regard to patient ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Results of DCD-LT at the University Hospital of Liège were evaluated from 2003 to 2011. Methods: Medical records of 56 DCD liver recipients were retrospectively reviewed with regard to patient and graft survivals and biliary complications. Mean follow-up was 26.4 months. Mean donor age was 56.3±14.5 years (25 - 83). Donor causes of death were due to anoxia (51.8%), stroke (32.1%) and head trauma (14.3%). Mean WIT, CIT and suture time were 20.5±7.1min (10 – 39), 265.6±85.1min (105 – 576), and 40.8±7.8 min (25 – 61), respectively. 95% of liver grafts were locally shared. HTK was the most commonly used perfusion solution (86%). Mean recipient age was 56.6±10.5 years (29 – 73). Indications for LT included ESLD (53.6%) and HCC (46.6%). Mean MELD score at transplant was 15.6±6.1points (6 – 40). Results: No primary non-function grafts. Mean peak serum AST and bilirubin levels were 2520±3621UI/L and 50.2±49.2mg/L, respectively. Eight patients (14.3%) developed biliary complications. No intra-hepatic bile duct strictures or re-transplantation. Global patient and graft survival was 92.6% at 3 months, 92.6% at 1 year, 73.8% at 3 years and 60% at 5 years. Death-censored patient and graft survival at the corresponding time points was 92.6%, 92.6%, 87.7% and 87.7%. Thirteen liver grafts were lost during follow-up exclusively due to recipient deaths. The rate of HCC recurrence was 33.3%. Conclusions: Controlled DCD donors are a valuable source of transplantable liver grafts. Primary results are encouraging and apparently as good as those from brain-dead donation LT essentially due to short WIT and CIT. [less ▲]

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See detailResults of kidney transplantation from controlled donors after cardio-circulatory death: a single center experience
Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 667

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival ... [more ▼]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post-transplant complications. The influence of delayed graft function (DGF) on graft survival and DGF risk factors were analyzed as secondary end-points. Methods: This is a retrospective mono-center review of a consecutive series of 80 DCD-KT performed at the University Hospital of Sart Tilman, University of Liège, between Jan 2005 and Dec 2011. Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. Results: Overall graft survival was 93.7%, 89.5%, 85% and 81.3% at 3 months, 1 year, 3 and 5 years, respectively. Death-censored graft survival at the corresponding time points was 93.7%, 93.7%, 90.8% and 90.8%. Main cause of graft loss was patient’s death with a functioning graft. No primary non-function grafts were encountered. Renal graft function was suboptimal at hospital discharge, but nearly normalized at 3 months. DGF was observed in 36% of all DCD-KT. DGF significantly increased post-operative length of hospitalization, but had no deleterious impact on graft function or survival. Donor body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2, recipient BMI ≥30 kg/m2 and pre-transplant dialysis duration significantly increased the risk of DGF in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Despite a higher rate of DGF, controlled DCD-KT offers a valuable contribution to the pool of deceased donor kidney grafts, with comparable mid-term results to those procured after brain death. [less ▲]

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See detailLaparoscopic liver resection: a single center experience
SZECEL, Delphine ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 631

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See detailWhat is the potential increase of the heart graft pool by cardiac donation after circulatory death?
NOTERDAEME, Timothée; HANS, Marie-France ULg; NELLESSEN, Eric ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 668

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See detailEFFECT OF PARECOXIB, A SELECTIVE COX-2 INHIBITOR, IN THE PREVENTION OF POSTOPERATIVE ADHESIONS IN A RAT MODEL
Arung Kalau, Willy ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg; CHERAMY-BIEN, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8444

Objectives: Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are frequent after abdominal surgery. Many preventive agents have been tried in animal models and in clinical trials, but up to now, there has been no ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are frequent after abdominal surgery. Many preventive agents have been tried in animal models and in clinical trials, but up to now, there has been no definitive strategy to prevent their formation. In this study, the effectiveness of parecoxib (Dynastat®), a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, in preventing experimental intra-abdominal adhesions in rats was studied. Methods: Thirty male rats who underwent a primary surgical procedure aiming at inducing peritoneal injury to produce intraabdominal adhesion, were randomized in three groups: (A) control group, no therapy; (B) intraperitoneal (IP) parecoxib group; (C) intramuscular (IM) parecoxib group. Ten days later, a xyphopubic midline incision was performed and the whole abdominal cavity was explored to score the peritoneal adhesions. Results: Twenty-three rats developed adhesions, 9 (100%) in group A, 7 (70%) in group B and 4 (40%) in group C (P=0.01). The extent and severity scores of adhesion were significantly lower in groups B and C than those in control group (p<0.001). Type of adhesions was measured at 2.25 ± 0.67 in group A, 1.20 ± 0.86 in group B and 0.82 ± 0.80 in group C. This was significantly different between group A and B (p<0.001), between A and C (p<0.001). But no significant difference was found between group B and C (p=0.17). Conclusions: In this study, we found a significant effect on parecoxib in the prevention of postoperative adhesions. But, without avoiding completely the formation of adhesion, parecoxib reduces significantly extent and severity of postoperative adhesions in rats treated with IP or IM parecoxib administration. [less ▲]

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See detailINTRAPERITONEAL ADHESIONS AFTER OPEN OR LAPAROSCOPIC ABDOMINAL PROCEDURE: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN THE RAT
Arung, Willy; Drion, Pierre ULg; CHERAMY-BIEN, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8546

Objectives: Adhesion formation is common after abdominal surgery. The incidence and severity of adhesion formation following open or laparoscopic surgery remain controversial. The role of CO2 ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Adhesion formation is common after abdominal surgery. The incidence and severity of adhesion formation following open or laparoscopic surgery remain controversial. The role of CO2 pneumoperitoneum is also largely discussed. This study aimed to compare adhesion formation following peritoneal injury by electrocoagulation performed through open or laparoscopic procedures in a rat model. Methods: Sixty male rats were randomized to undergo a 1.5cm peritoneal injury with unipolar cautery under general anesthesia: open surgery (group A, n=20), laparoscopic surgery with CO2 pneumoperitoneum (group B, n=20) and laparoscopic surgery with air pneumoperitoneum (group C, n=20). Duration of the procedures was fixed at 90 minutes in all groups, and pneumoperitoneum pressure at 10mmHg. Ten days later, the animals underwent a secondary laparotomy to score peritoneal adhesions using qualitative and quantitative parameters. Results: Forty-five rats developed at least one adhesion, respectively 95% in group A, 83% in group B and 55% in group C (P<0.01; Group C vs Group A, P<0.01). According to number, thickness, tenacity, vascularization, extent, type, and grading according to Zühkle classification, no significant difference was observed between groups A and B. The distribution of adhesions after open surgery was significantly different than after laparoscopic surgery (P<0.001). Interestingly, group C rats developed significantly less adhesions at the traumatized site, and their adhesions had less severe qualitative scores compared to open surgery (P<0.01). Conclusions: In this animal model, CO2 laparoscopic surgery did not decrease the formation of postoperative adhesion, compared to open surgery. The difference with the animals operated with air pneumoperitoneum emphasizes the role of CO2 in peritoneal injury leading to adhesion formation. [less ▲]

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See detailDREAM 2012: DEVELOPMENT OF LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY AT THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL OF KINSHASA, DRC
Nsadi Fwene, Berthier ULg; Veyi, D; Kazadi, J et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8240

Objectives: The technical nature of laparoscopy, and the required specific laparoscopic tools and medical skills, may render this approach difficult in developing countries. We hypothesized that ... [more ▼]

Objectives: The technical nature of laparoscopy, and the required specific laparoscopic tools and medical skills, may render this approach difficult in developing countries. We hypothesized that laparoscopy may be developed in the Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa (CUK), and may be cost-effective. The final aim of this program is to bring the benefits of laparoscopy to the DRC population, by allowance of adequate training on the UNIKIN personnel, including anaesthetists, surgeons and nurses, who in the future will have to locally form the DRC medical and nursery students. Methods: With the financial support from Wallonie-Bruxelles International (WBI), a complete CUK team, including a surgeon (2 years training in Belgium), an anaesthetist and nurses, were trained in Belgium and then afterwards in DRC. The laparoscopic equipment was sent to Kinshasa, and three theoretical and practical missions of Belgian teams were organised. Results: Over a 2 year period, 116 laparoscopic procedure were performed, including 32 appendectomies, 41 cholecystectomies, 11 hernia repairs, 9 laparoscopy explorations for peritoneal carcinoma assessment and biopsy, 8 procedures for catheter of dialysis peritoneal, 5 gynecologics procedures, and 10 other miscellaneous procedures. Conclusions: A joined approach, taking into account on one hand the training of the skills locally trained to adapt itself to some difficulties, on the other hand institutions of scientific support and a real program and local will of development of this new procedure are the wages of development, accessibility and durability of such news approach in developing countries. All University and non-University team willing to join such a project are welcome. [less ▲]

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See detailDelayed graft function does not harm the future of donation-after- cardiac-death kidney transplants
LeDinh, H; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2012, March 29)

Introduction: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of DGF on post-transplant outcomes in controlled DCD kidney grafts. Patients and Methods: This single-center retrospective study recruited 80 controlled DCD kidney allo- grafts which have been performed at the University Hospital of Sart Tilman, University of Liège, from Jan 2005 to Dec 2011. Results: Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. No primary non-function grafts were encountered. DGF rate was 36%. Overall graft survivals between groups with and without DGF were 92.4% and 95.1% at 1 year, 92.4% and 91.7% at 3 years, and 84.7% and 91.7% at 5 years (p=ns), respectively. Patients with and without DGF had the same survival rates at the corresponding time points (92.4% and 97.1%, 92.4% and 93.7%, and 84.7% and 93.7%, p=ns, respectively). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was significantly lower in DGF group compared to non-DGF group at hospital discharge (29 vs 42 ml/min, p=0.001) and up to 1 year post-transplant (46 vs 53 ml/min, p=0.045), but the differ- ence disappeared afterwards (50 vs 48 ml/min at 3 years, and 54 vs 53 ml/min at 5 years, p=ns). DGF did not increase the risk of acute rejection or surgical complications. 29.6% of recipients with DGF de- veloped acute rejection (biopsy-proven rejection and clinically suspected rejection) compared with 29.2% of recipients without DGF (p=ns). The rate of all surgical complications was 33.3% and 25% in recipients with and without DGF (p=ns). However, DGF prolonged significantly the length of hospitaliza- tion in DGF than non-DGF group (18.9 vs 13 days, p=0.000). Donor BMI 􏰤 30 kg/m2􏰁􏰀􏰚􏰌􏰈􏰏􏰥􏰏􏰌􏰝􏰣􏰀􏰕􏰉􏰂􏰀􏰤 30 kg/m2 and pre-transplant dialysis duration increased the risk of DGF in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: Apart from longer hospital stay, DGF had no deleterious impact on the future of DCD kidney allografts. Comparable graft and patient survival, renal function, rejection rate and surgical com- plications were observed between groups with and without DGF. [less ▲]

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See detailResults of kidney transplantation from controlled donors after cardio-circulatory death: a single center experience.
Ledinh, H.; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Transplant International (2012), 25

The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post-transplant complications. The influence of delayed graft function (DGF) on graft survival and DGF risk factors were analyzed as secondary end-points. This is a retrospective mono-center review of a consecutive series of 59 DCD-KT performed between 2005 and 2010. Overall graft survival was 96.6%, 94.6%, and 90.7% at 3 months, 1 and 3 years, respectively. Main cause of graft loss was patient's death with a functioning graft. No primary nonfunction grafts. Renal graft function was suboptimal at hospital discharge, but nearly normalized at 3 months. DGF was observed in 45.6% of all DCD-KT. DGF significantly increased postoperative length of hospitalization, but had no deleterious impact on graft function or survival. Donor body mass index >/=30 was the only donor factor that was found to significantly increase the risk of DGF (P < 0.05). Despite a higher rate of DGF, controlled DCD-KT offers a valuable contribution to the pool of deceased donor kidney grafts, with comparable mid-term results to those procured after brain death. [less ▲]

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See detailOutcome of the living kidney donor
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; DUBOIS, Bernard ULg et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2012), 27(1), 41-50

Renal transplantation from living kidney donors is still relatively marginal in most of the European countries. However, this source of kidney grafts may help to overcome in part the organ donor shortage ... [more ▼]

Renal transplantation from living kidney donors is still relatively marginal in most of the European countries. However, this source of kidney grafts may help to overcome in part the organ donor shortage of cadaveric donors. The living donor strategy implies correct and objective information about donation risks and completely free acceptance of the living candidate of the donation. In this paper, we reviewed the consequences of kidney donation on the living donor health, considering very short term (linked to the surgery), short term (effect of nephrectomy on glomerular filtration rate) and long term (risk of mortality, chronic kidney disease, proteinuria and hypertension) consequences of kidney donation. [less ▲]

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See detailSurgical management of acute cholecystitis: results of a 2-year prospective multicenter survey in Belgium.
Navez, Benoit; Ungureanu, Felicia; Michiels, Martens et al

in Surgical Endoscopy (2012), 26(9), 2436-2445

BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is considered nowadays as the standard management of acute cholecystitis (AC). However, results from multicentric studies in the general surgical community are ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is considered nowadays as the standard management of acute cholecystitis (AC). However, results from multicentric studies in the general surgical community are still lacking. METHODS: A prospective multicenter survey of surgical management of AC patients was conducted over a 2-year period in Belgium. Operative features and patients' clinical outcome were recorded. The impact of independent predictive factors on the choice of surgical approach, the risk of conversion, and the occurrence of postoperative complications was studied by multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Fifty-three surgeons consecutively and anonymously included 1,089 patients in this prospective study. A primary open approach was chosen in 74 patients (6.8%), whereas a laparoscopic approach was the first option in 1,015 patients (93.2%). Independent predictive factors for a primary open approach were previous history of upper abdominal surgery [odds ratio (OR) 4.13, p < 0.001], patient age greater than 70 years (OR 2.41, p < 0.05), surgeon with more than 10 years' experience (OR 2.08, p = 0.005), and gangrenous cholecystitis (OR 1.71, p < 0.05). In the laparoscopy group, 116 patients (11.4%) required conversion to laparotomy. Overall, 38 patients (3.5%) presented biliary complications and 49 had other local complications (4.5%). Incidence of bile duct injury was 1.2% in the whole series, 2.7% in the open group, and 1.1% in the laparoscopy group. Sixty patients had general complications (5.5%). The overall mortality rate was 0.8%. All patients who died were in poor general condition [American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) III or IV]. CONCLUSIONS: Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy is currently considered as the standard treatment for acute cholecystitis, an open approach is still a valid option in more advanced disease. However, overall mortality and incidence of bile duct injury remain high. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of maribavir dosed at 100 mg orally twice daily for the prevention of cytomegalovirus disease in liver transplant recipients: a randomized, double-blind, multicenter controlled trial.
Winston, D. J.; Saliba, F.; Blumberg, E. et al

in American Journal of Transplantation (2012), 12(11), 3021-30

Maribavir is an oral benzimidazole riboside with potent in vitro activity against cytomegalovirus (CMV), including some CMV strains resistant to ganciclovir. In a randomized, double-blind, multicenter ... [more ▼]

Maribavir is an oral benzimidazole riboside with potent in vitro activity against cytomegalovirus (CMV), including some CMV strains resistant to ganciclovir. In a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, the efficacy and safety of prophylactic oral maribavir (100 mg twice daily) for prevention of CMV disease were compared with oral ganciclovir (1000 mg three times daily) in 303 CMV-seronegative liver transplant recipients with CMV-seropositive donors (147 maribavir; 156 ganciclovir). Patients received study drug for up to 14 weeks and were monitored for CMV infection by blood surveillance tests and also for the development of CMV disease. The primary endpoint was Endpoint Committee (EC)-confirmed CMV disease within 6 months of transplantation. In a modified intent-to-treat analysis, the noninferiority of maribavir compared to oral ganciclovir for prevention of CMV disease was not established (12% with maribavir vs. 8% with ganciclovir: event rate difference of 0.041; 95% CI: -0.038, 0.119). Furthermore, significantly fewer ganciclovir patients had EC-confirmed CMV disease or CMV infection by pp65 antigenemia or CMV DNA PCR compared to maribavir patients at both 100 days (20% vs. 60%; p < 0.0001) and at 6 months (53% vs. 72%; p = 0.0053) after transplantation. Graft rejection, patient survival, and non-CMV infections were similar for maribavir and ganciclovir patients. Maribavir was well-tolerated and associated with fewer hematological adverse events than oral ganciclovir. At a dose of 100 mg twice daily, maribavir is safe but not adequate for prevention of CMV disease in liver transplant recipients at high risk for CMV disease. [less ▲]

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See detailDelayed graft function does not harm the future of donation-after-cardiac death in kidney transplantation.
Le Dinh, Hieu; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2012), 44(9), 2795-802

INTRODUCTION: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of DGF on posttransplantation outcomes among grafts from controlled DCD kidneys. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This single-center retrospective study recruited 80 controlled DCD kidneys transplanted from January 2005 to December 2011. Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. RESULTS: There were no primary nonfunction grafts; the DGF rate was 35.5%. Overall graft survival rates between groups with versus without DGF were 92.4% and 95.2% at 1 year, 92.4% and 87.1% at 3 years, and 84.7% and 87.1% at 5 years, respectively (P = not significant (NS)). Patients with versus without DGF showed the same survival rates at the corresponding time 92.4% vs 97.2%, 92.4% vs 93.9%, and 84.7% vs 93.9% (P = NS). Estimated glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the DGF compared with the non-DGF group at hospital discharge (29 vs 42 mL/min; P = .00) and at 6 months posttransplantation (46 vs 52 mL/min; P = .04), but the difference disappeared thereafter: 47 vs 52 mL/min at 1 year, 50 vs 48 mL/min at 3 years, and 54 vs 53 mL/min at 5 years (P = NS). DGF did not increase the risk of an acute rejection episode (29.6% vs 30.6%; P = NS) or rate of surgical complications (33.3% vs 26.5%; P = NS). However, DGF prolonged significantly the length of hospitalization in the DGF versus the non- DGF group (18.9 vs 13 days; P = .00). Donor body mass index (BMI) >/= 30 kg/m(2), recipient BMI >/=30 kg/m(2), and pretransplantation dialysis duration increased the risk of DGF upon multivariate logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Apart from the longer hospital stay, DGF had no deleterious impact on the future of kidney allografts from controlled DCD, which showed comparable graft and patient survivals, renal function, rejection rates, and surgical complications as a group without DGF. Therefore, DGF should no longer be considered to be a medical barrier to the use of kidney grafts from controlled DCD. [less ▲]

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See detailChoice of key-words for a scientific paper.
VAN DAMME, Hendrik ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg; Lerut, J et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012), 112(2), 107

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See detailPlease Doctor, Resist NOTES!
DETRY, Olivier ULg

in Annals of Surgery (2011), 254(5), 839-840

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See detailPRESERVATION OF NORMAL MORPHOLOGY OF HUMAN LIVERS AFTER 24 HOURS OF HYPOTHERMIC MACHINE PERFUSION. A FIRST-IN-MAN STUDY
Monbaliu, D.; Liu, Q.; Libbrecht, L. et al

in Transplant International (2011, September), 24(2), 151-151

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See detailLIVER TRANSPLANTATION FROM DONATION AFTER CARDIOCIRCULATORY DEATH (DCD) DONORS: BELGIAN EXPERIENCE 2003-2009
DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; Cicarelli, Olga et al

in Transplant International (2011, September), 24(2), 84-84

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