References of "Detilleux, Johann"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailMorphometric Study of the Equine Navicular Bone: Variations with Breeds and Types of Horse and Influence of Exercise
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Jolly, Sandra ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Journal of Anatomy (1998), 193((Pt 4)), 535-49

Navicular bones from the 4 limbs of 95 horses, classified in 9 categories, were studied. The anatomical bases were established for the morphometry of the navicular bone and its variations according to the ... [more ▼]

Navicular bones from the 4 limbs of 95 horses, classified in 9 categories, were studied. The anatomical bases were established for the morphometry of the navicular bone and its variations according to the category of horse, after corrections were made for front or rear limb, sex, weight, size and age. In ponies, navicular bone measurements were smallest for light ponies and regularly increased with body size, but in horses, navicular bone dimensions were smallest for the athletic halfbred, intermediate for draft horse, thoroughbreds and sedentary halfbreds and largest for heavy halfbreds. The athletic halfbred thus showed reduced bone dimensions when compared with other horse types. Navicular bones from 61 horses were studied histomorphometrically. Light horses and ponies possessed larger amounts of cancellous bone and less cortical bone. Draft horses and heavy ponies showed marked thickening of cortical bone with minimum intracortical porosity, and a decrease in marrow spaces associated with more trabecular bone. Two distinct zones were observed for the flexor surface cortex: an external zone composed mainly of poorly remodelled lamellar bone, disposed in a distoproximal oblique direction, and an internal zone composed mainly of secondary bone, with a lateromedial direction for haversian canals. Flexor cortex external zone tended to be smaller for heavy ponies than for the light ponies. It was the opposite for horses, with the largest amount of external zone registered for draft horses. In athletic horses, we observed an increase in the amount of cortical bone at the expense of cancellous bone which could be the result of reduced resorption and increased formation at the corticoendosteal junction. Cancellous bone was reduced for the athletic horses but the number of trabeculae and their specific surfaces were larger. Increased bone formation and reduced resorption could also account for these differences. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (6 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEtude radiologique de l’os naviculaire normal. Partie 1: que penser des canaux sésamoïdiens du bord distal
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Jolly, S.; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1998), 142

The scoring system based on the different types of navicular distal border canals is a good method to quantify and relativise the anomalies in number, shape and localisation of the canals. The distal ... [more ▼]

The scoring system based on the different types of navicular distal border canals is a good method to quantify and relativise the anomalies in number, shape and localisation of the canals. The distal border score varies significantly with the limb (fore or rear), the morphological type, the gender and the age of the horse. These anatomical variations are of importance and must be taken into account when examining a suspect bone. The score is larger for the fore navicular bone than for the rear. It could be interesting to compare both scores: rear navicular bone score is generally equal to half (or slight less) that of the fore. The score is larger for heavy types of horses and ponies (drafthorse, heavy halfbreds and Fjords). This phenomenon could be related to a larger pressure within the distal interphalangeal joint. The score is lower for the athletic half bred than for other halfbreds. This could be the result of the changes in bone architecture induced by exercise and particularly bone densification. The score is lower for the female than for the male. We think that navicular bone quality is better for the female and this idea corroborates that of other authors that consider that the risk to develop navicular disease is smaller for the female than for the male. The score increases with age. it is particularly small in young horses less than two years old and then increases strongly. This phenomenon is to be related to the progressive development, in the first year of life, of the groove between articular cartilage and distal impar ligament, canals developping only later one. In athletic horses, the score is higher between 7 and 12 years of age. During this time, we also observe more degenerative changes within the navicular bone, which could mean that bone is of lesser quality. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailA new methodology to analyse monthly somatic cell counts
Detilleux, Johann ULg; Volckaert, D.; Leroy, Pascal ULg

(1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMorphometric Study of the Equine Navicular Bone: Comparisons between Fore and Rear Limbs
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Yousfi, S.; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Zentralblatt für Veterinarmedizin. Reihe A (1997), 44(9-10), 579-94

Navicular bones collected from the four limbs of 95 sound horses were studied. The anatomic bases have been laid down about morphometry of the navicular bones and their variations according to limbs ... [more ▼]

Navicular bones collected from the four limbs of 95 sound horses were studied. The anatomic bases have been laid down about morphometry of the navicular bones and their variations according to limbs, after corrections have been made for morphologic type, gender, weight, size and age. All the dimensions of the navicular bone (except for the thickness) were larger in the fore limb. This phenomenon probably reflects an attempt to compensate for the greater forces exerted upon the fore limbs during exercise and at rest. Navicular bones collected from the four limbs of 61 sound horses were studied and the anatomic bases were described for histomorphometry of the fore and rear navicular bones. Fore navicular bones possess less cortical bone at the level of the articular surface, as well as at the level of the flexor surface and proximal border, but larger amounts of cancellous bone. Articular and flexor surface cortical bone show a larger porosity in the fore navicular bones and a larger amount of mineralized cartilage. The mineralized portion for distal impar- and collateral sesamoidean ligaments are also larger for the fore navicular bones. Two distinct zones are observed for the flexor surface cortex that have never been reported in the literature before: an external zone, which is mainly composed of poorly remodelled lamellar bone, arranged in a disto-proximal oblique direction, and an internal zone, which is mainly composed of secondary bone, with a latero-medial direction of Haversian canals. Bone architecture is discussed with regard to the mechanic load, encountered by the bone during locomotion. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (10 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailA computer program to optimize herd dairy management
Harvengt, A.; Detilleux, Johann ULg; Chapaux, Ph. et al

(1997)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
See detailLa nutrition et les mammites
Mayombo, Asangule Pierre; Istasse, Louis ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Les mammites de la vache laitière (1997)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasures of mastitis
Detilleux, Johann ULg; Kehrli, M.E.Jr.; Freeman, A. E. et al

(1996)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailGenetic evaluation of type traits in Northern part of Belgium
Detilleux, Johann ULg; Volckaert, D.; Leroy, Pascal ULg

(1996)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 ULg)