References of "Detilleux, Johann"
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See detailEosinophilic Bronchopneumopathy in Dogs
Clercx, Cécile ULg; Peeters, Dominique ULg; Snaps, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2000), 14(3, May-Jun), 282-91

Eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy was diagnosed in 23 young dogs. Clinical signs included cough, gagging, and retching in all dogs, dyspnea in 21 dogs (91%), and nasal discharge in 12 dogs (52%). The most ... [more ▼]

Eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy was diagnosed in 23 young dogs. Clinical signs included cough, gagging, and retching in all dogs, dyspnea in 21 dogs (91%), and nasal discharge in 12 dogs (52%). The most common radiographic findings were a moderate to severe bronchointerstitial pattern (68%, 13 of 19 dogs). Bronchoscopic findings included the presence of abundant yellow-green mucus or mucopurulent material (70%, 16 of 23 dogs) and severe mucosal thickening with an irregular or polypoid appearance (52%, 12 of 23 dogs), with partial airway closure during expiration in 3 dogs (13%). Peripheral blood eosinophilia was noted in 14 of 23 dogs (61%). Inflammatory cells in brush or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytologic preparations comprised more than 50% eosinophils in 14 of 23 dogs (61%), and 20-50% eosinophils in 6 dogs (26%). Eosinophilic infiltration of the bronchial mucosa was observed in biopsies from 19 dogs and was graded as mild (37%, 7 dogs), moderate (32%, 6 dogs), or severe (32%, 6 dogs). The mean serum immunoglobulin A concentration was almost double that of a population of 20 healthy dogs of various breeds. Oral glucocorticoids were administered on alternate days with progressive tapering of the dose; the dosage at maintenance varied between 0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg every other day. No relationship was found between the duration of clinical signs and the maintenance dosage or the cytologic and histopathologic grades. [less ▲]

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See detailMethods for Estimating Areas under Receiver-Operating Characteristic Curves: Illustration with Somatic-Cell Scores in Subclinical Intramammary Infections
Detilleux, Johann ULg; Arendt, J.; Lomba, F. et al

in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (1999), 41(2-3), 75-88

The aim of this study was to demonstrate receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) methodology in the context of bovine intramammary infection (IMI). Quarter somatic cell scores (SCS) were available to ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to demonstrate receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) methodology in the context of bovine intramammary infection (IMI). Quarter somatic cell scores (SCS) were available to evaluate quarter IMI, and the final IMI diagnosis was made from milk bacteriologic cultures. Data consisted of 11,453 quarter-milk samples collected on 2084 clinically healthy cows located in 154 Belgian herds. Bacteriological analyses showed 16.2%, 7.2%, and 11.9% of quarters infected with coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus agalactiae, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., respectively. The ROC curve indicated all the combinations of sensitivity and specificity that quarter SCS was able to provide as a test to identify quarter IMI. Among parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric methods to estimate area under ROC curves, the parametric method seemed the least appropriate for analyzing SCS in this study. With the non-parametric method, the total area under the ROC curves showed quarter SCS could identify quarter IMI with an overall accuracy of 69%, 76%, and 59% for coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp., S. agalactiae, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., respectively. Parametric and non-parametric statistical tests showed that overall SCS diagnostic capability was significantly (p<0.01) different from chance and was different (p<0.01) across the three bacteria. However, the SCS thresholds yielding the highest percentage of quarters correctly classified as infected (for the observed prevalence and for equal costs assigned to false-positive and false-negative results) were so high that they had no practical value. The major advantage of ROC analysis is the comprehensive description of the discrimination capacity of SCS for all possible choices of critical values. The major disadvantage is the dependency upon the gold standard used for the final diagnosis--but recent improvements of the methodology will correct the problem. [less ▲]

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See detailGravity Score and Shock Score as an Aid to dertemine the prognosis in Equine Surgical Colic Cases
Grulke, Sigrid ULg; Olle, Enrice; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Veterinary Surgery : The Official Journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (1999, July)

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See detailMorphometrical study of the equine navicular bone: age-related changes and influence of exercise
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg; Jolly, Sandra ULg et al

in Veterinary Research Communications (1999), 23(1), 15-40

Navicular bones from the four limbs of 95 horses, classified in 9 categories, were studied. The effects of age on navicular bone morphometry and histomorphometry were estimated, after adjustment of the ... [more ▼]

Navicular bones from the four limbs of 95 horses, classified in 9 categories, were studied. The effects of age on navicular bone morphometry and histomorphometry were estimated, after adjustment of the data to even out the effects of front and rear limbs, morphometrical type, sex, weight, and size. All the external measurements of the navicular bone decreased significantly with increasing age. From the histomorphometrical data, cortical bone volume decreased with age in most horses, whereas cancellous bone volume and, in particular, the marrow spaces increased. The increase in the cancellous bone volume could have resulted from tunnelling of the internal part of the cortex, which converted it progressively into a porous trabecular-like structure. Trabecular bone volume also decreased with age and the trabecular lattice changed dramatically to become disconnected in aged horses. These observations corresponded closely to those reported for ageing of the skeletal system in humans. However, in sporting horses, the navicular cortical bone volume increased with age and the cancellous bone volume decreased. Exercise appeared to have decreased bone resorption and increased bone formation at the endocortical junction. The cancellous bone architecture was also improved. in that the trabecular lattice and trabecular bone volume remained unchanged in aged sporting horses. Our findings confirmed that exercise may be good practice to prevent age-related bone loss. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphometric Study of the Equine Navicular Bone: Variations with Breeds and Types of Horse and Influence of Exercise
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Jolly, Sandra ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Journal of Anatomy (1998), 193((Pt 4)), 535-49

Navicular bones from the 4 limbs of 95 horses, classified in 9 categories, were studied. The anatomical bases were established for the morphometry of the navicular bone and its variations according to the ... [more ▼]

Navicular bones from the 4 limbs of 95 horses, classified in 9 categories, were studied. The anatomical bases were established for the morphometry of the navicular bone and its variations according to the category of horse, after corrections were made for front or rear limb, sex, weight, size and age. In ponies, navicular bone measurements were smallest for light ponies and regularly increased with body size, but in horses, navicular bone dimensions were smallest for the athletic halfbred, intermediate for draft horse, thoroughbreds and sedentary halfbreds and largest for heavy halfbreds. The athletic halfbred thus showed reduced bone dimensions when compared with other horse types. Navicular bones from 61 horses were studied histomorphometrically. Light horses and ponies possessed larger amounts of cancellous bone and less cortical bone. Draft horses and heavy ponies showed marked thickening of cortical bone with minimum intracortical porosity, and a decrease in marrow spaces associated with more trabecular bone. Two distinct zones were observed for the flexor surface cortex: an external zone composed mainly of poorly remodelled lamellar bone, disposed in a distoproximal oblique direction, and an internal zone composed mainly of secondary bone, with a lateromedial direction for haversian canals. Flexor cortex external zone tended to be smaller for heavy ponies than for the light ponies. It was the opposite for horses, with the largest amount of external zone registered for draft horses. In athletic horses, we observed an increase in the amount of cortical bone at the expense of cancellous bone which could be the result of reduced resorption and increased formation at the corticoendosteal junction. Cancellous bone was reduced for the athletic horses but the number of trabeculae and their specific surfaces were larger. Increased bone formation and reduced resorption could also account for these differences. [less ▲]

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See detailEtude radiologique de l’os naviculaire normal. Partie 1: que penser des canaux sésamoïdiens du bord distal
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Jolly, S.; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1998), 142

The scoring system based on the different types of navicular distal border canals is a good method to quantify and relativise the anomalies in number, shape and localisation of the canals. The distal ... [more ▼]

The scoring system based on the different types of navicular distal border canals is a good method to quantify and relativise the anomalies in number, shape and localisation of the canals. The distal border score varies significantly with the limb (fore or rear), the morphological type, the gender and the age of the horse. These anatomical variations are of importance and must be taken into account when examining a suspect bone. The score is larger for the fore navicular bone than for the rear. It could be interesting to compare both scores: rear navicular bone score is generally equal to half (or slight less) that of the fore. The score is larger for heavy types of horses and ponies (drafthorse, heavy halfbreds and Fjords). This phenomenon could be related to a larger pressure within the distal interphalangeal joint. The score is lower for the athletic half bred than for other halfbreds. This could be the result of the changes in bone architecture induced by exercise and particularly bone densification. The score is lower for the female than for the male. We think that navicular bone quality is better for the female and this idea corroborates that of other authors that consider that the risk to develop navicular disease is smaller for the female than for the male. The score increases with age. it is particularly small in young horses less than two years old and then increases strongly. This phenomenon is to be related to the progressive development, in the first year of life, of the groove between articular cartilage and distal impar ligament, canals developping only later one. In athletic horses, the score is higher between 7 and 12 years of age. During this time, we also observe more degenerative changes within the navicular bone, which could mean that bone is of lesser quality. [less ▲]

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See detailA new methodology to analyse monthly somatic cell counts
Detilleux, Johann ULg; Volckaert, D.; Leroy, Pascal ULg

(1998)

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See detailMorphometric Study of the Equine Navicular Bone: Comparisons between Fore and Rear Limbs
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Yousfi, S.; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Zentralblatt für Veterinarmedizin. Reihe A (1997), 44(9-10), 579-94

Navicular bones collected from the four limbs of 95 sound horses were studied. The anatomic bases have been laid down about morphometry of the navicular bones and their variations according to limbs ... [more ▼]

Navicular bones collected from the four limbs of 95 sound horses were studied. The anatomic bases have been laid down about morphometry of the navicular bones and their variations according to limbs, after corrections have been made for morphologic type, gender, weight, size and age. All the dimensions of the navicular bone (except for the thickness) were larger in the fore limb. This phenomenon probably reflects an attempt to compensate for the greater forces exerted upon the fore limbs during exercise and at rest. Navicular bones collected from the four limbs of 61 sound horses were studied and the anatomic bases were described for histomorphometry of the fore and rear navicular bones. Fore navicular bones possess less cortical bone at the level of the articular surface, as well as at the level of the flexor surface and proximal border, but larger amounts of cancellous bone. Articular and flexor surface cortical bone show a larger porosity in the fore navicular bones and a larger amount of mineralized cartilage. The mineralized portion for distal impar- and collateral sesamoidean ligaments are also larger for the fore navicular bones. Two distinct zones are observed for the flexor surface cortex that have never been reported in the literature before: an external zone, which is mainly composed of poorly remodelled lamellar bone, arranged in a disto-proximal oblique direction, and an internal zone, which is mainly composed of secondary bone, with a latero-medial direction of Haversian canals. Bone architecture is discussed with regard to the mechanic load, encountered by the bone during locomotion. [less ▲]

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See detailA computer program to optimize herd dairy management
Harvengt, A.; Detilleux, Johann ULg; Chapaux, Ph. et al

(1997)

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See detailLa nutrition et les mammites
Mayombo, Asangule Pierre; Istasse, Louis ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Les mammites de la vache laitière (1997)

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (4 ULg)