References of "Desaive, Thomas"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVariability of insulin sensitivity during the first 4 days of critical illness: implications for tight glycemic control
Pretty, Christopher ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in Annals of Intensive Care (2012)

Introduction: Effective tight glycaemic control (TGC) can improve outcomes in critical care patients, but is difficult to achieve consistently. Insulin sensitivity defines the metabolic balance between ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Effective tight glycaemic control (TGC) can improve outcomes in critical care patients, but is difficult to achieve consistently. Insulin sensitivity defines the metabolic balance between insulin concentration and insulin mediated glucose disposal. Hence, variability of insulin sensitivity can cause variable glycaemia. This study quantifies and compares the daily evolution of insulin sensitivity level and variability for critical care patients receiving TGC. <br /> <br />Methods: A retrospective analysis of data from the SPRINT TGC study involving patients admitted to a mixed medical-surgical ICU between August 2005 and May 2007. Only patients who commenced TGC within 12 hours of ICU admission and spent at least 24 hours on the SPRINT protocol were included (N=164). Model-based insulin sensitivity (SI) was identified each hour. Absolute level and hour-to-hour percent changes in SI were assessed on cohort and per-patient bases. Levels and variability of SI were compared over time on 24-hour and 6-hour timescales for the first 4 days of ICU stay. <br /> <br />Results: Cohort and per-patient median SI levels increased by 34% and 33% (p<0.001) between days 1 and 2 of ICU stay. Concomitantly, cohort and per-patient SI variability decreased by 32% and 36% (p<0.001). For 72% of the cohort, median SI on day 2 was higher than on day 1. The day 1-2 results are the only clear, statistically significant trends across both analyses. <br /> <br />Analysis of the first 24 hours using 6-hour blocks of SI data showed that most of the improvement in insulin sensitivity level and variability seen between days 1 and 2 occurred during the first 12-18 hours of day 1. <br /> <br />Conclusions: Critically ill patients have significantly lower and more variable insulin sensitivity on day 1 than later in their ICU stay and particularly during the first 12 hours. This rapid improvement is likely due to the decline of counter-regulatory hormones as the acute phase of critical illness progresses. Clinically, these results suggest that while using TGC protocols with patients during their first few days of ICU stay, extra care should be afforded. Increased measurement frequency, higher target glycaemic bands, conservative insulin dosing and modulation of carbohydrate nutrition should be considered to safely minimize outcome glycaemic variability and reduce the risk of hypoglycaemia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (18 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes Tight Glycemic Control positively impact on patient mortality?
Penning, Sophie ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Signal, Matthew et al

Poster (2012, March 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes Tight Glycemic Control positively impact on patient mortality?
Penning, Sophie ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Signal, Matthew et al

in Critical Care (2012, March 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPilot Trial of STAR in Medical ICU
Fisk, Liam M.; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Shaw, Geoffrey M. et al

Poster (2012, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBeat-to-beat estimation of the continuous left and right cardiac elastance from metrics commonly available in clinical settings.
Stevenson, David; Revie, James; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2012), 11(1), 73

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: : Functional time-varying cardiac elastances (FTVE) contain a rich amount of information about the specific cardiac state of a patient. However, a FTVE waveform is very invasive to ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: : Functional time-varying cardiac elastances (FTVE) contain a rich amount of information about the specific cardiac state of a patient. However, a FTVE waveform is very invasive to directly measure, and is thus currently not used in clinical practice. This paper presents a method for the estimation of a patient specific FTVE, using only metrics that are currently available in a clinical setting. METHOD: : Correlations are defined between invasively measured FTVE waveforms and the aortic and pulmonary artery pressures from 2 cohorts of porcine subjects, 1 induced with pulmonary embolism, the other with septic shock. These correlations are then used to estimate the FTVE waveform based on the individual aortic and pulmonary artery pressure waveforms, using the "other" dysfunction's correlations as a cross validation. RESULTS: : The cross validation resulted in 1.26% and 2.51% median errors for the left and right FTVE respectively on pulmonary embolism, while the septic shock cohort had 2.54% and 2.90% median errors. CONCLUSIONS: : The presented method accurately and reliably estimated a patient specific FTVE, with no added risk to the patient. The cross validation shows that the method is not dependent on dysfunction and thus has the potential for generalisation beyond pulmonary embolism and septic shock. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAlgorithmic Processing of Pressure Waveforms to FacilitateEstimation of Cardiac Elastance
Stevenson, D.; Revie, J.; Chase, J. G. et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2012), 11

Introduction: Cardiac elastances are highly invasive to measure directly, but are clinically useful due tothe amount of information embedded in them. Information about the cardiac elastance, which can be ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Cardiac elastances are highly invasive to measure directly, but are clinically useful due tothe amount of information embedded in them. Information about the cardiac elastance, which can be used toestimate it, can be found in the downstream pressure waveforms of aortic pressure (Pao) and the pulmonaryartery (Ppa). However these pressure waveforms are typically noisy and biased, and require processing in orderto locate the specific information required for the cardiac elastance estimation. This paper presents the methodto algorithmically process the pressure waveforms. Methods: A shear transform is developed in order to helplocate information in the pressure waveforms. This transform turns difficult to locate corners into easy to locatemaximum or minimum points as well as providing error correction. Results: The method located all points 87out of 88 waveforms for Ppa to within the sampling frequency. For Pao, out of 616 total points, 605 were foundwithin 1%, 5 within 5%, 4 within 10% and 2 within 20%. Conclusions: The presented method provides arobust, accurate and dysfunction independent way to locate points on the aortic and pulmonary artery pressurewaveforms, allowing the non-invasive estimation of the left and right cardiac elastance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComputer-based monitoring of global cardiovascular dynamics during acute pulmonary embolism and septic shock in swine
Revie, JA; Stevenson, D; Chase, JG et al

in Critical Care (2012), 16 (Suppl 1)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVariability of insulin sensitivity during the first 4 days of critical illness
Pretty, Christopher ULg; Le Compte, A; Chase, JG et al

in Critical Care (2012), 16 (Suppl 1)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCumulative time in band (cTIB): glycemic level, variability and patient outcome vs mortality
Penning, Sophie ULg; Signal, M; Preiser, JC et al

in Proceedings of ANZICS 2012 (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailArterial dP/dtmax accurately reflects left ventricular contractility during shock when adequate vascular filling is achieved
MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders (2012), 12:13

Background: Peak first derivative of femoral artery pressure (arterial dP/dt max) derived from fluid-filled catheter remains questionable to assess left ventricular (LV) contractility during shock. The ... [more ▼]

Background: Peak first derivative of femoral artery pressure (arterial dP/dt max) derived from fluid-filled catheter remains questionable to assess left ventricular (LV) contractility during shock. The aim of this study was to test if arterial dP/dt maxis reliable for assessing LV contractility during various hemodynamic conditions such as endotoxin-induced shock and catecholamine infusion.Methods: Ventricular pressure-volume data obtained with a conductance catheter and invasive arterial pressure obtained with a fluid-filled catheter were continuously recorded in 6 anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs. After a stabilization period, endotoxin was infused to induce shock. Catecholamines were transiently administrated during shock. Arterial dP/dt maxwas compared to end-systolic elastance (Ees), the gold standard method for assessing LV contractility.Results: Endotoxin-induced shock and catecholamine infusion lead to significant variations in LV contractility. Overall, significant correlation (r = 0.51; p < 0.001) but low agreement between the two methods were observed. However, a far better correlation with a good agreement were observed when positive-pressure ventilation induced an arterial pulse pressure variation (PPV) ≤ 11% (r = 0.77; p < 0.001).Conclusion: While arterial dP/dt maxand Ees were significantly correlated during various hemodynamic conditions, arterial dP/dt maxwas more accurate for assessing LV contractility when adequate vascular filling, defined as PPV ≤ 11%, was achieved. © 2012 Morimont et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRespiratory system elastance monitoring during PEEP titration
Chiew, YS; Chase, JG; Shaw, GM et al

in Critical Care (2012), 34 (Suppl 1)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPilot Trial of STAR in Medical ICU
Fisk, LM; Le Compte, A; Shaw, GM et al

in Critical Care (2012), 16 (Suppl 1)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPhysiological relevance and performance of a minimal lung model -- an experimental study in healthy and acute respiratory distress syndrome model piglets
Chiew, Y. S.; Chase, J. G.; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in BMC Pulmonary Medicine (2012), 12:59

Background: Mechanical ventilation (MV) is the primary form of support for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, intra- and inter- patient-variability reduce the efficacy of ... [more ▼]

Background: Mechanical ventilation (MV) is the primary form of support for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, intra- and inter- patient-variability reduce the efficacy of general protocols. Model-based approaches to guide MV can be patient-specific. A physiological relevant minimal model and its patient-specific performance are tested to see if it meets this objective above. Methods: Healthy anesthetized piglets weighing 24.0 kg [IQR: 21.0-29.6] underwent a step-wise PEEP increase manoeuvre from 5cmH2O to 20cmH2O. They were ventilated under volume control using Engstrom Care Station (Datex, General Electric, Finland), with pressure, flow and volume profiles recorded. ARDS was then induced using oleic acid. The data were analyzed with a Minimal Model that identifies patient-specific mean threshold opening and closing pressure (TOP and TCP), and standard deviation (SD) of these TOP and TCP distributions. The trial and use of data were approved by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty of the University of Liege, Belgium.Results and discussions3 of the 9 healthy piglets developed ARDS, and these data sets were included in this study. Model fitting error during inflation and deflation, in healthy or ARDS state is less than 5.0% across all subjects, indicating that the model captures the fundamental lung mechanics during PEEP increase. Mean TOP was 42.4cmH2O [IQR: 38.2-44.6] at PEEP = 5cmH2O and decreased with PEEP to 25.0cmH2O [IQR: 21.5-27.1] at PEEP = 20cmH2O. In contrast, TCP sees a reverse trend, increasing from 10.2cmH2O [IQR: 9.0-10.4] to 19.5cmH2O [IQR: 19.0-19.7]. Mean TOP increased from average 21.2-37.4cmH2O to 30.4-55.2cmH2O between healthy and ARDS subjects, reflecting the higher pressure required to recruit collapsed alveoli. Mean TCP was effectively unchanged. Conclusion: The minimal model is capable of capturing physiologically relevant TOP, TCP and SD of both healthy and ARDS lungs. The model is able to track disease progression and the response to treatment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvolution de l’insulino-résistance au cours de l’hypothermie thérapeutique
Moermans, A; Taccone, F; Penning, Sophie ULg et al

in Proceedings des journees francophone de nutrition 2012 (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPhysiological Relevance of a Minimal Model in Healthy Pigs Lungs
Chiew, YS; Desaive, Thomas ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in Proceedings of BMS 2012 (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPerformance of lung recruitment model in healthy anesthetised pigs
Chiew, YS; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg; JANSSEN, Nathalie ULg et al

in Proceedings of the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering 2012 (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRange90 as indicator for ventilator output versus patients demand: NAVA and pressure support for non-invasively ventilated patients
Chiew, YS; Piquilloud, L.; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in Proceedings of the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering 2012 (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlucose control: How tight? - How modeling could help?
Desaive, Thomas ULg; Chase, JG

Conference (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEstimating afterload, systemic vascular resistance and pulmonary vascular resistance in an intensive care setting
Stevenson, D; Revie, J.; Chase, JG et al

in Proceedings of BMS2012 (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)