References of "Desaive, Thomas"
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See detailModel-based glycemic control in critical care
Pretty, Christopher ULg; Penning, Sophie ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J. et al

Poster (2012, December)

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See detailModel-based glycemic control in critical care
Pretty, Christopher ULg; Penning, Sophie ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J. et al

in Proceedings of the 11th Belgian Day on Biomedical Engineering (2012, December)

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See detailInsulin clearance during hyper-insulinemia euglycemia therapy
Penning, Sophie ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg; Pretty, Christopher ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 11th Belgian Day on Biomedical Engineering (2012, December)

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See detailInsulin clearance during hyper-insulinemia euglycemia therapy
Penning, Sophie ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg; Pretty, Christopher ULg et al

Poster (2012, December)

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See detailMathematical models in intensive care units
Desaive, Thomas ULg

Scientific conference (2012, October 22)

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See detailCumulative time in band (cTIB): glycemic level, variability and patient outcome all in one
Penning, Sophie ULg; Signal, Matthew; Preiser, Jean-Charles et al

Conference (2012, October 15)

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See detailCumulative time in band: glycemic level, variability and patient outcome vs. mortality
Penning, Sophie ULg; Signal, Matthew; Preiser, Jean-Charles et al

Poster (2012, October)

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See detailCumulative Time in Band (cTIB): Glycemic Level, Variability and Patient Outcome All in 1
Penning, Sophie ULg; Signal, Matthew; Preiser, Jean-Charles et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2012, October), 38 (Suppl 1)

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See detailSecond pilot trials of the STAR-Liege protocol for tight glycemic control in critically ill patients
Penning, Sophie ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J.; MASSION, Paul ULg et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2012)

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See detailDevelopment and Identification of a Closed-Loop Model of the Cardiovascular System Including the Atria
Pironet, Antoine ULg; Revie, James A.; Paeme, Sabine ULg et al

Conference (2012, August 31)

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See detailStructural model of the mitral valve included in a cardiovascular closed loop model. Static and dynamic validation
Paeme, Sabine ULg; Pironet, Antoine ULg; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in proceedings of 8th IFAC Symposium on Biological and Medical Systems, Budapest 29-31 août 2012 (2012, August 31)

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See detailAutonomous electrical activity induced by cardiac tissue deformation in a thermo-electro-mechanical background
Collet, Arnaud ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg

in 8th IFAC Symposium on Biological and Medical Systems (2012, August)

In a healthy heart, the mechano-electric feedback (MEF) process acts as an intrinsic regulatory mechanism of the myocardium which allows the normal cardiac contraction by damping mechanical perturbations ... [more ▼]

In a healthy heart, the mechano-electric feedback (MEF) process acts as an intrinsic regulatory mechanism of the myocardium which allows the normal cardiac contraction by damping mechanical perturbations in order to generate a new healthy electromechanical situation. However, under certain conditions, the MEF can be a generator of dramatic arrhythmias by inducing local electrical depolarizations as a result of abnormal cardiac tissue deformations, via stretch-activated channels (SACs). Then, these perturbations can propagate in the whole heart and lead to global cardiac dysfunctions. In the present study, we examine the spatio-temporal behavior of the autonomous electrical activity induced by the MEF when the heart is subject to temperature variations. For instance, such a situation can occur during a therapeutic hypothermia. This technique is usually used to prevent neuronal injuries after a cardiac resuscitation. From this perspective, we introduce a one-dimensional time-dependent model containing all the key ingredients that allow accounting for excitation-contraction coupling, MEF and thermoelectric coupling. Our simulations show that an autonomous electrical activity can be induced by cardiac deformations, but only inside a certain temperature interval. In addition, in some cases, the autonomous electrical activity takes place in a periodic way like a pacemaker. We also highlight that some properties of the action potentials that are generated by the MEF, are significantly influenced by temperature. Moreover, in the situation where a pacemaker activity occurs, we also show that the period is heavily temperature-dependent. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment and Identification of a Closed-Loop Model of the Cardiovascular System Including the Atria
Pironet, Antoine ULg; Revie, James A.; Paeme, Sabine ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 8th IFAC Symposium on Biological and Medical Systems (2012, August)

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See detailInsulin Kinetics during Hyper-Insulinemia Euglycemia Therapy (HIET)
Penning, Sophie ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J. et al

in Proceedings of the 8th IFAC Symposium on Biological and Medical Systems (2012, August)

Hyper-insulinemia euglycemia therapy (HIET) is a supra-physiological insulin dosing protocol used in acute cardiac failure to reduce dependency on inotropes to augment or generate cardiac output, and is ... [more ▼]

Hyper-insulinemia euglycemia therapy (HIET) is a supra-physiological insulin dosing protocol used in acute cardiac failure to reduce dependency on inotropes to augment or generate cardiac output, and is based on the inotropic effects of insulin at high doses up to 45-250x normal daily dose. Such high insulin doses are managed using intravenous glucose infusion to control glycemia and prevent hypoglycemia. However, both insulin dosing and glycemic control in these patients is managed ad-hoc. This research examines a selection of clinical data to determine the effect of high insulin dosing on renal clearance and insulin sensitivity, to assess the feasibility of using model-based methods to control and guide these protocols. The results show that the model and, in particular, the modeled renal clearance constant are adequate and capture measured data well, although not perfectly. Equally, insulin sensitivity over time is similar to broader critical care cohorts in level and variability, and these results are the first time they have been presented for this cohort. While more data is needed to confirm and further specify these results, it is clear that the model used is adequate for controlling HIET in a model-based framework. [less ▲]

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See detailInsulin Kinetics during Hyper-Insulinemia Euglycemia Therapy (HIET)
Penning, Sophie ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J. et al

Conference (2012, August)

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See detailDevelopment and Pilot Trial Results of Stochastic Targeted (STAR) Glycemic Control in a Medical ICU
Fisk, Liam M.; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Shaw, Geoffrey M. et al

in Proceedings of the 8th IFAC Symposium on Biological and Medical Systems (2012, August)

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See detailVariability of insulin sensitivity during the first 4 days of critical illness: implications for tight glycemic control
Pretty, Christopher ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in Annals of Intensive Care (2012)

Introduction: Effective tight glycaemic control (TGC) can improve outcomes in critical care patients, but is difficult to achieve consistently. Insulin sensitivity defines the metabolic balance between ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Effective tight glycaemic control (TGC) can improve outcomes in critical care patients, but is difficult to achieve consistently. Insulin sensitivity defines the metabolic balance between insulin concentration and insulin mediated glucose disposal. Hence, variability of insulin sensitivity can cause variable glycaemia. This study quantifies and compares the daily evolution of insulin sensitivity level and variability for critical care patients receiving TGC. <br /> <br />Methods: A retrospective analysis of data from the SPRINT TGC study involving patients admitted to a mixed medical-surgical ICU between August 2005 and May 2007. Only patients who commenced TGC within 12 hours of ICU admission and spent at least 24 hours on the SPRINT protocol were included (N=164). Model-based insulin sensitivity (SI) was identified each hour. Absolute level and hour-to-hour percent changes in SI were assessed on cohort and per-patient bases. Levels and variability of SI were compared over time on 24-hour and 6-hour timescales for the first 4 days of ICU stay. <br /> <br />Results: Cohort and per-patient median SI levels increased by 34% and 33% (p<0.001) between days 1 and 2 of ICU stay. Concomitantly, cohort and per-patient SI variability decreased by 32% and 36% (p<0.001). For 72% of the cohort, median SI on day 2 was higher than on day 1. The day 1-2 results are the only clear, statistically significant trends across both analyses. <br /> <br />Analysis of the first 24 hours using 6-hour blocks of SI data showed that most of the improvement in insulin sensitivity level and variability seen between days 1 and 2 occurred during the first 12-18 hours of day 1. <br /> <br />Conclusions: Critically ill patients have significantly lower and more variable insulin sensitivity on day 1 than later in their ICU stay and particularly during the first 12 hours. This rapid improvement is likely due to the decline of counter-regulatory hormones as the acute phase of critical illness progresses. Clinically, these results suggest that while using TGC protocols with patients during their first few days of ICU stay, extra care should be afforded. Increased measurement frequency, higher target glycaemic bands, conservative insulin dosing and modulation of carbohydrate nutrition should be considered to safely minimize outcome glycaemic variability and reduce the risk of hypoglycaemia. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes Tight Glycemic Control positively impact on patient mortality?
Penning, Sophie ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Signal, Matthew et al

Poster (2012, March 20)

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See detailDoes Tight Glycemic Control positively impact on patient mortality?
Penning, Sophie ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Signal, Matthew et al

in Critical Care (2012, March 20)

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