References of "Deroisy, Rita"
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See detailStrontium Ranelate normalizes bone mineral density in osteopenic patients
Malaise, Olivier; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006, June), 17(Suppl.2), 103

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See detailStrontium Ranelate normalizes bone mineral density in osteopenic patients
Malaise, Olivier; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006, March), 17(Suppl.1), 63

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See detailD-Hormone analog alfacalcidol: an update on its role in post-menopausal osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis management
Richy, F.; Deroisy, Rita ULg; Lecart, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Aging Clinical & Experimental Research (2005), 17(2), 133-142

Alfacalcidol (1-alpha-hydroxyvitamin D is a non-endogenous analog of vitamin D which can bypass the renal and intestinal regulatory mechanisms that control the production of calcitriol (1,25 ... [more ▼]

Alfacalcidol (1-alpha-hydroxyvitamin D is a non-endogenous analog of vitamin D which can bypass the renal and intestinal regulatory mechanisms that control the production of calcitriol (1,25-hydroxyvitamin D-3, the active form of vitamin D, D-Hormone). Alfiacalcidol may be metabolized into calcitriol with a limited risk of hypercalcemia. Alfacalcidol and calcitriol have been evaluated in animal and human studies assessing their effects on bone mineral density and fracture rates. More recently, they have been shown to produce beneficial effects in muscle, immune system, and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. This paper discusses the therapeutic efficacy of alfacalcidol in reports in which it has been proposed as an interesting alternative to vitamin D or calcitriol. Some recent findings about general metabolism and regulation of vitamin D and its analogs are discussed. The biological and clinical effects of alfacalcidol in post-menopausal osteoporosis are reviewed, followed by critical appraisal of its efficacy in preventing bone loss and falls in the elderly. The lost two sections discuss the role of Danalogs in regulating the immune system, with particular regard to rheumatoid arthritis. The main results of this review show that alfacalcidol may have a wider range of therapeutic applicability, beyond simply restricting it to patients in hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis with high serum levels of intact PTH. (c) 2005, Editrice Kurtis. [less ▲]

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See detailD-hormone analog alfacalcidol: its role in postmenopausal osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis management
Richy, Florent; DEROISY, Rita ULg; LECART, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 105-106

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See detailPatients prefer calcium+vitamin D3 chewable tablets (Steovit D3) above calcium+vitamin D3 effervescent powder (Cacit D3)
Kaufman, Jean-Marc; DEROISY, Rita ULg; Gangji, V. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3),

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See detailStrontium ranelate: a new paradigm in the treatment of osteoporosis.
REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; LECART, Marie-Paule ULg; DEROISY, Rita ULg et al

in Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs (2004), 13(7), 857-64

In vitro, strontium ranelate increases collagen and non-collagenic protein synthesis by mature osteoblast-enriched cells. The effects of strontium ranelate on bone formation were confirmed as the drug ... [more ▼]

In vitro, strontium ranelate increases collagen and non-collagenic protein synthesis by mature osteoblast-enriched cells. The effects of strontium ranelate on bone formation were confirmed as the drug enhanced preosteoblastic cell replication. In the isolated osteoclast, a preincubation of bone slices with strontium ranelate induced a dose-dependent inhibition of the bone resorbing activity of treated rat osteoclast. Strontium ranelate dose-dependently inhibited preosteoclast differentiation. The drug was administered in 160 early postmenopausal women, in a 24-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective randomised study. At the conclusion of the study, the percentage variation of lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) from baseline was significantly different in the group receiving strontium ranelate 1000 mg/day as compared with placebo (+5.53 versus -0.75%, respectively). Increase in total hip and neck BMD averages were 3.2 and 2.5%, respectively. The effect of strontium ranelate in postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis was assessed during a multinational, prospective, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Strontium ranelate (500, 1000, 2000 mg/day) or placebo were given to 353 Caucasian women with prevalent vertebral osteoporosis. At the conclusion of this 2-year study, the annual increase in lumbar BMD of the group receiving strontium ranelate 2000 mg was 7.3% (p < 0.001). A significant increase in bone alkaline phophatase (p = 0.002) over a 6-month period and a significant decrease in N-telopeptide crosslinks (p = 0.004) throughout the 2-year period were seen in the group receiving 2000 mg of strontium ranelate. During the second year of treatment, the dose of 2000 mg was associated with a 44% reduction in the number of patients experiencing a new vertebral deformity. Bone histomorphometry showed no mineralisation defects. The primary analysis of the SOTI study, evaluating the effect of strontium ranelate 2000 mg on vertebral fracture rates, revealed a 41% reduction in the relative risk of patients experiencing a first new vertebral fracture with strontium ranelate throughout the 3-year study. The TROPOS study showed a significant reduction in the risk of experiencing a first non-vertebral fracture in the group treated with strontium ranelate throughout the 3-year study. A reduction in the risk of experiencing a hip fracture was also demonstrated in the patients treated for > or = 18 months. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoarthritic patients with high cartilage turnover show increased responsiveness to the cartilage protecting effects of glucosamine sulphate
Christgau, Stephan; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Tanko, Laszlo B et al

in Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology (2004), 22(1, JAN-FEB), 36-42

Objective Glucosamine sulphate has been shown in a large double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to prevent structural damage and improve clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated ... [more ▼]

Objective Glucosamine sulphate has been shown in a large double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to prevent structural damage and improve clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated whether early response in a newly developed biochemical marker of collagen type II degradation (CTX-II, CartiLaps ELISA) could reflect the long-term preservation of hyaline cartilage. Methods Study subjects comprised 212 knee OA patients participating in a clinical trial of the effects of glucosamine sulphate. Disease symptoms were assessed quarterly by WOMAC scoring and X-ray analysis was performed at baseline and after 3 years. Urine samples were obtained at baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 years for measurement in the CartiLaps assay. The measurements were corrected for creatinine. Results At baseline the patients had an average concentration of urinary CTX-II of 222.4 +/- 159.5 ng/mmol creatinine. This was significantly above the CTX-II levels measured in urine samples from 415 healthy controls (169.1 +/- 92.3 ng/mmol, p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the CTX-II response in the placebo group and the glucosamine treated group. However, those with high cartilage turnover presented a significant decrease in CTX-II after 12-month glucosamine treatment. Thus, thee group with CTX II concentrations above normal average + ISD decreased 15.5 % after 12-month therapy. The 12 months change in CTX-II in OA patients with elevated CTX-II at baseline correlated with the change in average joint space width observed after 36 months (R = 0.43, p < 0.05). Increased baseline levels of CTX-II were associated with a worsening of the WOMAC index (p < 0.01). Conclusion The data indicate that measurement of urinary collagen type H C-telopeptide fragments enables the identification of OA patients with high cartilage turnover who at the same time are most responsive to therapy with structure modifying drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine sulfate reduces osteoarthritis progression in postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis: evidence from two 3-year studies
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Pavelka, K.; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Menopause (2004), 11(2), 138-143

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of glucosamine sulfate on long-term symptoms and structure progression in postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: This study consisted of a ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of glucosamine sulfate on long-term symptoms and structure progression in postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: This study consisted of a preplanned combination of two three-year, randomized, placebo-controlled, prospective, independent studies evaluating the effect of glucosamine sulfate on symptoms and structure modification in OA and post-hoc analysis of the results obtained in postmenopausal women with knee OA. Minimal joint space width was assessed at baseline and after 3 years from standing anteroposterior knee radiographs. Symptoms were scored by the algo-functional WOMAC index at baseline and after 3 years. All primary statistical analyses were performed in intention-to-treat, comparing joint space width and WOMAC changes between groups by ANOVA. RESULTS: Of 414 participants randomized in the two studies, 319 were postmenopausal women. At baseline, glucosamine sulfate and placebo groups were comparable for demographic and disease characteristics, both in the general population and in the postmenopausal women subset. After 3 years, postmenopausal participants in the glucosamine sulfate group showed no joint space narrowing [joint space change of +0.003 mm (95% CI, -0.09 to 0.11)], whereas participants in the placebo group experienced a narrowing of -0.33 mm (95% CI, -0.44 to -0.22; P < 0.0001 between the two groups). Percent changes after 3 years in the WOMAC index showed an improvement in the glucosamine sulfate group [-14.1% (95%, -22.2 to -5.9)] and a trend for worsening in the placebo group (5.4% (95% CI, -4.9 to 15.7) (P = 0.003 between the two groups). CONCLUSION: This analysis, focusing on a large cohort of postmenopausal women, demonstrated for the first time that a pharmacological intervention for OA has a disease-modifying effect in this particular population, the most frequently affected by knee OA. [less ▲]

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See detailFive-year follow-up patients issued from a previous 3-year randomised, controlled trial of glucosamine sulfate in knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Compère, S.; Gathy, C. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2003, November), 14(Suppl 7), 9

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See detailFive-year follow-up of patients from a previous 3-year randomised, controlled trial of glucosamine sulfate in knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Compere, S.; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2003, October), 11(Suppl.1), 10-11

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See detailFive-year follow-up of patients from a previous 3-year randomised, controlled trial of glucosamine sulfate in knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Compere, Stephanie; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2003, September), 48(number 9 (suppl.)), 80

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See detailStrontium ranelate: A new paradigm in the treatment of osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg; Jupsin, Isabelle ULg

in Drugs of Today (2003), 39(2), 89-101

Not one of the currently available medications has, so far, unequivocally demonstrated its ability to fully prevent the occurrence of new vertebral or peripheral osteoporotic fractures once osteoporosis ... [more ▼]

Not one of the currently available medications has, so far, unequivocally demonstrated its ability to fully prevent the occurrence of new vertebral or peripheral osteoporotic fractures once osteoporosis is established. Therefore, several new therapies are currently under development to optimize the risk/benefit ratio of osteoporosis treatment. Strontium ranelate is composed of an organic moiety (ranelic acid) and of two atoms of stable nonradioactive strontium. In vitro, strontium ranelate increases Collagen and noncollagenic proteins synthesis by mature osteoblast enriched cells. The effects of strontium ranelate on bone formation were confirmed as strontium ranelate enhanced pre-osteoblastic cell replication. The stimulation by strontium ranelate of the replication of osteoprogenitor cell and collagen, as well as noncollagenic protein synthesis in osteoblasts, provides substantial evidence to categorize strontium ranelate as a bone-forming agent. In the isolated rat osteoclast assay, a pre-incubation of bone slices with strontium ranelate induced a dose-dependent inhibition of the bone resorbing activity of treated rat osteoclast. Strontium ranelate also dose-dependently inhibited, in a chicken bone marrow culture, the expression of both carbonic anhydrase 11 and the (x-subunit of the vitronectin receptor. These effects showing that strontium ranelate significantly affects bone resorption due to a direct and/or matrix-mediated inhibition of osteoclast activity and also inhibits osteoclasts differentiation, are compatible with the profile of an anti-resorptive drug. In normal rats, administration of strontium ranelate induces an improvement in the mechanical properties of the humerus and/or the lumbar vertebra associated with a commensurate increase in bone dimension, shaft and volume. Strontium ranelate was administered in 160 early postmenopausal women, in a 24-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective randomized study. Daily oral dose of 125 mg, 500 mg and 1 g of strontium ranelate were compared with a placebo. At the conclusion of the study, the percent variation of lumbar-adjusted bone mineral density from baseline was significantly different in the group receiving 1 g/day of strontium ranelate compared with placebo (+1.41% vs. -0.98%, respectively). Increase in total hip and neck bone mineral density averages, respectively, 3.2% and 2.5%. Strontium ranelate does not induce any significant adverse reaction compared with those observed in women receiving a placebo for the same duration. In a phase 11 study, the effect of strontium ranelate in postmenopausal women with vertebral osteoporotic fractures was assessed during a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Doses of 500 mg, 1 g and 2 g daily of strontium ranelate or placebo were given to 353 Caucasian women with prevalent osteoporosis. At the conclusion of this 2-year study, the annual increase in lumbar-adjusted bone mineral density of the group receiving 2 g of strontium ranelate was +2.97%. This result was significantly different compared with placebo. A significant increase in bone alkaline phosphatase and, over a 6-month period, a significant decrease in urinary-pyridium crosslinks (NTX) were evidenced. During the second year of treatment, the dose of 2 g was associated with a 44% reduction in the number of patients experiencing a new vertebral deformity. Bone histomorphometry showed no mineralization defects. The same percentage of withdrawals following an adverse effect was observed for patients receiving placebo and for those receiving 2 g of strontium ranelate. The compound was further investigated in a large phase III program that included two extensive trials for the treatment of severe osteoporosis, one assessing the effects of strontium ranelate on the risk of vertebral fractures (SOTI) and one evaluating its effects on peripheral (nonspinal) fractures (TROPOS). The primary analysis of the SOTI study, evaluating the effect of 2 g of strontium ranelate on vertebral fracture rates, revealed a 41% reduction in the relative risk of experiencing a first new vertebral fracture with strontium ranelate, throughout the 3-year study, compared with placebo. The TROPOS study, showed a significant (p = 0.05) reduction in the relative risk of experiencing a first non-vertebral fracture in the group treated with strontium ranelate throughout the 3-year study compared with placebo in the intention-to-treat population. A 41% reduction in the relative risk of experiencing a hip fracture was demonstrated in the per protocol population. All these results imply that strontium ranelate is a new, effective and safe treatment for vertebral and nonvertebral osteoporosis, with a unique mode of action. (C) 2003 Prous Science. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevention of early postmenopausal bone loss by strontium ranelate: The randomized, two-year, double-masked, dose-ranging, placebo-controlled PREVOS trial
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg; Dougados, M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2002), 13(12), 925-931

Early postmenopausal women (n = 160) were randomised to receive placebo or strontium ranelate (SR) 125 mg/day, 500 mg/day or 1 g/day for 2 years (40 participants per group). All participants received ... [more ▼]

Early postmenopausal women (n = 160) were randomised to receive placebo or strontium ranelate (SR) 125 mg/day, 500 mg/day or 1 g/day for 2 years (40 participants per group). All participants received calcium 500 mg/day. The primary efficacy parameter was the percent variation in lumbar bone mineral density (BMD), measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Secondary efficacy criteria included hip BMD and biochemical markers of bone turnover. At month 24, SR I g/day significantly increased lumbar BMD compared with placebo [mean (SD) +5.53% (5.12); p < 0.001] for measured values and [mean (SD) + 1.41% (5.33%); p < 0.05] for values adjusted for bone strontium content. The annual increase for adjusted values was +0.66% compared with -0.5% with placebo, with an overall beneficial effect after 2 years of about 2.4% with SR I g/day relative to placebo. There were no other significant between-group differences in adjusted lumbar BMD. Femoral neck and total hip BMD were also significantly increased at month 24 with SR I g/day compared with placebo [mean (SD): +2.46% (4.78) and +3.21% (4.68), respectively; both p < 0.001)]. SR 1 g/day significantly increased bone alkaline phosphatase at all time points (p < 0.05) compared with baseline and between-group analysis showed a significant increase, compared with placebo, at month 18 (p = 0.048). No effect on markers of bone resorption was observed. SR was as well tolerated as placebo. The minimum does at which SR is effective in preventing bone loss in early postmenopausal non-osteoporotic women is therefore 1 g/day. [less ▲]

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See detailPain relief is not a confounder in joint space narrowing assessment of full extension knee radiographs in osteoarthritis structure-modifying drug trials
Pavelka, K.; Rovati, Lucio C; Gatterova, J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2002, November), 13(Suppl.3), 19-20

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See detailPain relief is not a confounder in joint space narrowing assessment of full extension knee radiographs
Pavelka, K.; Rovati, Lucio C; Gatterova, J. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2002, June), 61(Suppl.1), 118

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