References of "Delille, Bruno"
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See detailSpatial and temporal CO2 exchanges measured by Eddy Covariance over a temperate intertidal flat and their relationships to net ecosystem production
Polsenaere, P.; Lamaud, E.; Lafon, V. et al

in Biogeosciences (2012), 9(1), 249--268

Measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes were performed over a temperate intertidal mudflat in southwestern France using the micrometeorological Eddy Covariance (EC) technique. EC measurements were carried ... [more ▼]

Measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes were performed over a temperate intertidal mudflat in southwestern France using the micrometeorological Eddy Covariance (EC) technique. EC measurements were carried out in two contrasting sites of the Arcachon flat during four periods and in three different seasons (autumn 2007, summer 2008, autumn 2008 and spring 2009). In addition, satellite images of the tidal flat at low tide were used to link the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) with the occupation of the mudflat by primary producers, particularly by Zostera noltii meadows. CO2 fluxes during the four deployments showed important spatial and temporal variations, with the flat rapidly shifting from sink to source with the tide. Absolute CO2 fluxes showed generally small negative (influx) and positive (efflux) values, with larger values up to −13 μmol m−2 s−1 for influxes and 19 μmol m−2 s−1 for effluxes. Low tide during the day was mostly associated with a net uptake of atmospheric CO2. In contrast, during immersion and during low tide at night, CO2 fluxes where positive, negative or close to zero, depending on the season and the site. During the autumn of 2007, at the innermost station with a patchy Zostera noltii bed (cover of 22 ± 14% in the wind direction of measurements), CO2 influx was −1.7 ± 1.7 μmol m−2 s−1 at low tide during the day, and the efflux was 2.7 ± 3.7 μmol m−2 s−1 at low tide during the night. A gross primary production (GPP) of 4.4 ± 4.1 μmol m−2 s−1 during emersion could be attributed to microphytobenthic communities. During the summer and autumn of 2008, at the central station with a dense eelgrass bed (92 ± 10%), CO2 uptakes at low tide during the day were −1.5 ± 1.2 and −0.9 ± 1.7 μmol m−2 s−1, respectively. Night time effluxes of CO2 were 1.0 ± 0.9 and 0.2 ± 1.1 μmol m−2 s−1 in summer and autumn, respectively, resulting in a GPP during emersion of 2.5 ± 1.5 and 1.1 ± 2.0 μmol m−2 s−1, respectively, attributed primarily to the seagrass community. At the same station in April 2009, before Zostera noltii started to grow, the CO2 uptake at low tide during the day was the highest (−2.7 ± 2.0 μmol m−2 s−1). Influxes of CO2 were also observed during immersion at the central station in spring and early autumn and were apparently related to phytoplankton blooms occurring at the mouth of the flat, followed by the advection of CO2-depleted water with the flooding tide. Although winter data as well as water carbon measurements would be necessary to determine a precise CO2 budget for the flat, our results suggest that tidal flat ecosystems are a modest contributor to the CO2 budget of the coastal ocean. [less ▲]

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See detailSea ice contribution to the air-sea CO2 exchange in the Arctic and Southern Oceans
Rysgaard, Søren; Bendtsen; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

in Tellus : Series B (2011), 63(5), 823-830

Although salt rejection from sea ice is a key process in deep-water formation in ice-covered seas, the concurrent rejection of CO2 and the subsequent effect on air–sea CO2 exchange have received little ... [more ▼]

Although salt rejection from sea ice is a key process in deep-water formation in ice-covered seas, the concurrent rejection of CO2 and the subsequent effect on air–sea CO2 exchange have received little attention. We review the mechanisms by which sea ice directly and indirectly controls the air–sea CO2 exchange and use recent measurements of inorganic carbon compounds in bulk sea ice to estimate that oceanic CO2 uptake during the seasonal cycle of sea-ice growth and decay in ice-covered oceanic regions equals almost half of the net atmospheric CO2 uptake in ice-free polar seas. This sea-ice driven CO2 uptake has not been considered so far in estimates of global oceanic CO2 uptake. Net CO2 uptake in sea-ice–covered oceans can be driven by; (1) rejection during sea–ice formation and sinking of CO2-rich brine into intermediate and abyssal oceanic water masses, (2) blocking of air–sea CO2 exchange during winter, and (3) release of CO2-depleted melt water with excess total alkalinity during sea-ice decay and (4) biological CO2 drawdown during primary production in sea ice and surface oceanic waters. [less ▲]

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See detailVariability of methane in the epilimnion of Lake Kivu
Borges, Alberto ULg; Abril, Gwenael; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Poster (2011, July 11)

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See detailO2/Ar and CH4 measurements in sea ice : clues for the key status of sea ice in the climate system
Zhou, Jiayun; Tison, Jean-Louis; Eicken, Hajo et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2011, April 08), 13

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See detailVariability of methane in the epilimnion of Lake Kivu
Borges, Alberto ULg; Abril, G.; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Poster (2011, April 08)

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See detailParticulate carbon export during a bloom of Emiliania huxleyi in the Northwest European continental margin (northern Bay of Biscay)
Schmidt, Sabine; Harlay, Jérôme ULg; Borges, Alberto ULg et al

Poster (2011, April 03)

Coccolithophores, the dominant pelagic calcifiers in the oceans, play a key role in the marine carbon cycle through calcification, primary production and carbon export, the main drivers of the biological ... [more ▼]

Coccolithophores, the dominant pelagic calcifiers in the oceans, play a key role in the marine carbon cycle through calcification, primary production and carbon export, the main drivers of the biological CO2 pump. Massive blooms of Emiliania huxleyi are observed each year at the continental margin of the Bay of Biscay. The BG02/11 cruise (RV Belgica), supported by near-real time remote sensing data, was conducted in early May 2002, along a transect on the outer shelf of the Northern Bay of Biscay between the La Chapelle Bank (southern region of the transect) and Goban Spur (northern region of the transect) (47.0°-50.5°N, 5.0°-11.0°W). Biogeochemical variables including primary production, calcification, partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), particle load, particulate organic and inorganic carbon (POC, PIC), Th-234 were measured in surface waters to assess particle dynamics, and carbon export in relation to the development of a coccolithophore bloom. We observed a marked northward decrease in water irradiance, Chl-a concentration and calcification rates: the bloom exhibited lower values and may have been less well developed in the Goban Spur area. There was also a large northward decrease in particulate 234Th settling fluxes along the transect from La Chapelle Bank to Goban Spur. The export fluxes of POC and PIC from the top 80 m, determined using the ratios of POC and PIC to Th-234 of particles, ranged from 81 to 323 mgC m-2 d-1 and from 30 to 128 mgC m-2 d-1, respectively. The highest fluxes were observed in waters presenting a well-developed coccolithophore bloom, as shown by high reflectance of surface waters. Despite the high calcification rates at the southernmost stations, surface waters were a net sink of atmospheric CO2 during this cruise. These results tend to demonstrate the enhancement of coccolithophore blooms on the efficiency of the surface community to export carbon to deep ocean. However, improvements in the estimation of POC and PIC export during coccolithophore blooms are needed to not only understand the present calcification to primary production (C:P) ratio, but also to help understand future sequestration of organic and inorganic carbon to the deep ocean. [less ▲]

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See detailTemporal evolution of biogeochemical properties of landfast sea ice at Barrow (Alaska)
Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Tison, Jean-Louis; Eicken, Hajo et al

Poster (2011, March)

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See detailA multidisciplinary approach to understanding the sea ice system: implications on gas. Gordon Research Seminars
Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Tison, Jean-Louis; Eicken, Hajo et al

Conference (2011, March)

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See detailBiogeochemistry and carbon mass balance of a coccolithophore bloom in the northern Bay of Biscay (June 2006)
Harlay, Jérôme ULg; Chou, Lei; De Bodt, Caroline et al

in Deep-Sea Research Part I, Oceanographic Research Papers (2011), 58(2), 111-127

Primary production (PP), calcification (CAL), bacterial production (BP) and dark community respiration (DCR) were measured along with a set of various biogeochemical variables, in early June 2006, at ... [more ▼]

Primary production (PP), calcification (CAL), bacterial production (BP) and dark community respiration (DCR) were measured along with a set of various biogeochemical variables, in early June 2006, at several stations at the shelf break of the northern Bay of Biscay. The cruise was carried out after the main spring diatom bloom that, based on the analysis of a time-series of remotely sensed chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), peaked in mid-April. Remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) indicated the occurrence of enhanced vertical mixing (due to internal tides) at the continental slope, while adjacent waters on the continental shelf were stratified, as confirmed by vertical profiles of temperature acquired during the cruise. The surface layer of the stratified water masses (on the continental shelf) was depleted of inorganic nutrients. Dissolved silicate (DSi) levels probably did not allow significant diatom development. We hypothesize that mixing at the continental slope allowed the injection of inorganic nutrients that triggered the blooming of mixed phytoplanktonic communities dominated by coccolithophores (Emiliania huxleyi) that were favoured with regards to diatoms due to the low DSi levels. Based on this conceptual frame, we used an indicator of vertical stratification to classify the different sampled stations, and to reconstruct the possible evolution of the bloom from the onset at the continental slope (triggered by vertical mixing) through its development as the water mass was advected on-shelf and stratified. We also established a carbon mass balance at each station by integrating in the photic layer PP, CAL and DCR. This allowed computation at each station of the contribution of PP, CAL and DCR to CO2 fluxes in the photic layer, and how they changed from one station to another along the sequence of bloom development (as traced by the stratification indicator). This also showed a shift from net autotrophy to net heterotrophy as the water mass aged (stratified), and suggested the importance of extracellular production of carbon to sustain the bacterial demand in the photic and aphotic layers. [less ▲]

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See detailOverview of CO2 dynamics within sea ice
Delille, Bruno ULg; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier ULg; Vancoppenolle, M. et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailGas concentrations in Barrow landfast sea ice: the winter/spring contrasts
Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Tison, Jean-Louis; Brabant, Frédéric et al

in Solas News (2011), 13(Summer), 22-23

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See detailSea ice and snow cover characteristics during the winter-spring transition in the Bellingshausen Sea: an overview of SIMBA 2007
Lewis, M. J.; Tison, Jean-Louis; Weissling et al

in Deep-Sea Research Part II, Topical Studies in Oceanography (2011), 58(9-10), 10191038

The Sea Ice Mass Balance in the Antarctic (SIMBA) experiment was conducted from the RVIB N.B. Palmer in September and October 2007 in the Bellingshausen Sea in an area recently experiencing considerable ... [more ▼]

The Sea Ice Mass Balance in the Antarctic (SIMBA) experiment was conducted from the RVIB N.B. Palmer in September and October 2007 in the Bellingshausen Sea in an area recently experiencing considerable changes in both climate and sea ice cover. Snow and ice properties were observed at 3 short-term stations and a 27-day drift station (Ice Station Belgica, ISB) during the winter-spring transition. Repeat measurements were performed on sea ice and snow cover at 5 ISB sites, each having different physical characteristics, with mean ice (snow) thicknesses varying from 0.6m (0.1m) to 2.3m (0.7m). Ice cores retrieved every five days from 2 sites and measured for physical, biological, and chemical properties. Three ice mass-balance buoys (IMBs) provided continuous records of snow and ice thickness and temperature. Meteorological conditions changed from warm fronts with high winds and precipitation followed by cold and calm periods through four cycles during ISB. The snow cover regulated temperature flux and controlled the physical regime in which sea ice morphology changed. Level thin ice areas had little snow accumulation and experienced greater thermal fluctuations resulting in brine salinity and volume changes, and winter maximum thermodynamic growth of ~0.6m in this region. Flooding and snow-ice formation occurred during cold spells in ice and snow of intermediate instead nearly isothermal, highly permeable ice persisted. In spring, short-lived cold air episodes did not effectively penetrate the sea ice nor overcome the effect of ocean heat flux, thus favoring net ice thinning from bottom melt over ice thickening from snow-ice growth, in all cases. These warm ice conditions were consistent with regional remote sensing observations of earlier ice breakup and a shorter sea ice season, more recently observed in the Bellingshausen Sea. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbonate system in the water masses of the Southeast Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during February and March 2008
Gonzalez-Davila, M.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Fine, R. A. et al

in Biogeosciences (2011), 8

Carbonate system variables were measured in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean along a transect from South Africa to the southern limit of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) from ... [more ▼]

Carbonate system variables were measured in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean along a transect from South Africa to the southern limit of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) from February to March 2008. Eddies detached from the retroflection of the Agulhas Current increased the gradients observed along the fronts. Minima in the fugacity of CO2, fCO2, and maxima in pH on either side of the frontal zone were observed, noting that within the frontal zone fCO2 reached maximum values and pH was at a minimum. Vertical distributions of water masses were described by their carbonate system properties and their relationship to CFC concentrations. Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW) and Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) offered pHT,25 values of 7.56 and 7.61, respectively. The UCDW also had higher concentrations of CFC-12 (>0.2 pmol kg−1) as compared to deeper waters, revealing that UCDW was mixed with recently ventilated waters. Calcite and aragonite saturation states (Ω) were also affected by the presence of these two water masses with high carbonate concentrations. The aragonite saturation horizon was observed at 1000 m in the subtropical area and north of the Subantarctic Front. At the position of the Polar Front, and under the influence of UCDW and LCDW, the aragonite saturation horizon deepened from 800 m to 1500 m at 50.37° S, and reached 700 m south of 57.5° S. High latitudes proved to be the most sensitive areas to predicted anthropogenic carbon increase. Buffer coefficients related to changes in [CO2], [H+] and Ω with changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) and total alkalinity (AT) offered minima values in the Antarctic Intermediate Water and UCDW layers. These coefficients suggest that a small increase in CT will sharply decrease the status of pH and carbonate saturation. Here we present data that suggest that south of 55° S, surface water will be under-saturated with respect to aragonite within the next few decades. [less ▲]

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See detailDiffusive methane emissions to the atmosphere from Lake Kivu (Eastern Africa)
Borges, Alberto ULg; Abril, Gwenaël; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences (2011), 116(G03032),

We report a data-set of methane (CH4) concentrations in the surface waters of Lake Kivu obtained during four cruises (March 2007, September 2007, June 2008, April 2009) covering the two main seasons ... [more ▼]

We report a data-set of methane (CH4) concentrations in the surface waters of Lake Kivu obtained during four cruises (March 2007, September 2007, June 2008, April 2009) covering the two main seasons, rainy (October to May) and dry (June to September). Spatial gradients of CH4 concentrations were modest in the surface waters of the main basin. In Kabuno Bay (a small sub-basin), CH4 concentrations in surface waters were significantly higher than in the main basin. Seasonal variations of CH4 in the main basin were strongly driven by deepening of the mixolimnion and mixing of surface waters with deeper waters rich in CH4. On an annual basis, both Kabuno Bay and the main basin of Lake Kivu were over-saturated in CH4 with respect to atmospheric equilibrium (7330% and 2510%, respectively), and emitted CH4 to the atmosphere (39 mmol m-2 yr-1 and 13 mmol m-2 yr-1, respectively). The source of CH4 to atmosphere was two orders of magnitude lower than the CH4 upward flux. The source of CH4 to the atmosphere from Lake Kivu corresponded to ~60% of the terrestrial sink of atmospheric CH4 over the lake’s catchment. A global cross-system comparison of CH4 in surface waters of lakes shows that both Kabuno Bay and the main basin are at the lower end of values in lakes globally, despite the huge amounts of CH4 in the deeper layers of the lake. This is related to the strongly meromictic nature of the lake that promotes an intense removal of CH4 by bacterial oxidation. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic processes in sea ice captured by the temporal evolution of its biogeochemical
Zhou, Jiayun; Tison, Jean-Louis; Eicken, Hajo et al

in VLIZ Special Publication (2011), 48

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See detailCarbon and nitrogen flows during a bloom of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi: Modelling a mesocosm experiment
Joassin, Pascal ULg; Delille, Bruno ULg; Soetaert, Karline et al

in Journal of Marine Systems (2011), 85

A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical variables and processes observed during experimental blooms of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi induced inmesocosms over a period of 23 ... [more ▼]

A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical variables and processes observed during experimental blooms of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi induced inmesocosms over a period of 23 days. The model describes carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycling through E. huxleyi and the microbial loop, and computes pH and the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). The main innovations are: 1) the representation of E. huxleyi dynamics using an unbalanced growthmodel in carbon and nitrogen, 2) the gathering of formulations describing typical processes involved in the export of carbon such as primary production, calcification, cellular dissolved organic carbon (DOC) excretion, transparent exopolymer (TEP) formation and viral lyses, and 3) an original and validated representation of the calcification process as a function of the net primary production with a modulation by the intra-cellular N:C ratio mimicking the effect of nutrients limitation on the onset of calcification. It is shown that this new mathematical formulation of calcification provides a better representation of the dynamics of TA, DIC and calcification rates derived from experimental data compared to classicaly used formulations (e.g. function of biomass or of net primary production without anymodulation term). In a first step, the model has been applied to the simulations of present pCO2 conditions. It adequately reproduces the observations for chemical and biological variables and provides an overall view of carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Carbon and nitrogen budgets are derived from the model for the different phases of the bloom, highlighting three distinct phases, reflecting the evolution of the cellular C:N ratio and the interaction between hosts and viruses. During the first phase, inorganic nutrients are massively consumed by E. huxleyi increasing its biomass. Uptakes of carbon and nitrogen are maintained at a constant ratio. The second phase is triggered by the exhaustion of phosphate (PO4 3−). Uptake of carbon and nitrogen being uncoupled, the cellular C:N ratio of E. huxleyi increases. This stimulates the active release of DOC, acting as precursors for TEP. The third phase is characterised by an enhancement of the phytoplankton mortality due to viral lysis. A huge amount of DOC has been accumulated in the mesocosm. [less ▲]

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See detailBenthic remineralization in the northwest European continental margin (northern Bay of Biscay)
Suykens, Kim; Schmidt, Sabine; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

in Continental Shelf Research (2011), 31

We report a dataset of sediment characteristics and biogeochemical fluxes at the watersediment interface at the northwest European continental margin (northern Bay of Biscay). Cores were obtained in June ... [more ▼]

We report a dataset of sediment characteristics and biogeochemical fluxes at the watersediment interface at the northwest European continental margin (northern Bay of Biscay). Cores were obtained in June 2006, May 2007 and 2008, at 18 stations on the shelf break (120 to 180 m), and at 2 stations on the continental slope (520 m and 680 m). Water-sediment fluxes of dissolved oxygen (O2), total alkalinity (TA), nitrate (NO3-), and dissolved silicate (DSi) were measured at a total of 20 stations. Sediment characteristics include: grain size, chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and phaeopigment (Phaeo) content, particulate organic (POC) and inorganic (PIC) carbon content, and lead-210 (210Pb) and thorium-234 (234Th) activities. Sediments were sandy (fine to coarse) with organic matter (OM) (1.0 - 4.0 %) and Chl-a (0.01 - 0.95 μg g-1) contents comparable to previous investigations in the same region, and a relatively high PIC fraction (0.8 - 10.2 %). Water-sediment O2 fluxes (-2.4 to -8.4 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) were low compared to other coastal environments and correlated well with OM and Chl-a content. 234Th activity profiles indicated that Chl-a sediment content was mainly controlled by physical mixing processes related to local hydrodynamics. The correlation between water-sediment fluxes of O2 and NO3- indicated a close coupling of nitrification/denitrification and total benthic organic carbon degradation. Dissolution of biogenic silica (0.05 to 0.95 mmol m-2 d-1) seemed uncoupled from organic carbon degradation, as characterized by water-sediment O2 fluxes. The link between water-sediment fluxes of TA and O2 indicated the occurrence of metabolic driven dissolution of calcium carbonates (CaCO3) in the sediments (~ 0.33 ± 0.47 mmol m-2 d-1) which represented ~ 1 % of the pelagic calcification rates due to coccolithophores measured during the cruises. These CaCO3 dissolution rates were below those reported in sediments of continental slopes and of the deep ocean, probably due to the high over-saturation with respect to CaCO3 of the water column overlying the continental shelf sediments of the northern Bay of Biscay. Rates of total benthic organic carbon degradation were low compared to water column rates of primary production and aphotic community respiration obtained during the cruises. [less ▲]

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See detailBiogeochemical study of a coccolithophore bloom in the northern Bay of Biscay (NE Atlantic Ocean) in June 2004
Harlay, Jérôme ULg; Borges, Alberto ULg; Van Der Zee, Claar et al

in Progress in Oceanography (2010), 86(3-4), 317-336

The present paper synthesizes data obtained during a multidisciplinary cruise carried out in June 2004 at the continental margin of the northern Bay of Biscay. The data-set allows to describe the ... [more ▼]

The present paper synthesizes data obtained during a multidisciplinary cruise carried out in June 2004 at the continental margin of the northern Bay of Biscay. The data-set allows to describe the different stages of a coccolithophore bloom dominated by Emiliania huxleyi. The cruise was carried out after the main spring phytoplankton bloom that started in mid-April and peaked in mid-May. Consequently, low phosphate (PO4<0.2 μM) and silicate (DSi<2.0 μM) concentrations, low partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and high calcite saturation degree in surface waters combined with thermal stratification, probably favoured the blooming of coccolithophores. During the period of the year our cruise was carried out, internal tides induce enhanced vertical mixing at the continental shelf break leading to the injection of inorganic nutrients to surface waters that probably trigger the bloom. The bloom developed as the water-column stratified and as the water mass was advected over the continental shelf, following the general residual circulation in the area. The most developed phase of the bloom was sampled in a remote sensed high reflectance (HR) patch over the continental shelf that was characterized by low chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration in surface waters (<1.0 μg L-1), high particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) concentration (~8 μmol L-1) and coccolithophore abundance up to 57×106 cells L-1. Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) concentrations ranged between 15 and 120 μg Xeq L-1 and carbon content of TEP represented up to 26% of the particulate organic carbon (POC; maximum concentration of 15.5 μmol L-1 in the upper 40 m). Integrated primary production (PP) ranged between 210 mg C m-2 d-1 and 680 mg C m-2 d-1 and integrated calcification (CAL) ranged between 14 and 140 mg C m-2 d-1, within the range of PP and CAL values previously reported during coccolithophore blooms in open and shelf waters of the North Atlantic Ocean. Bacterial protein production (BPP) measurements in surface waters (0.3 to 0.7 μg C L-1 h-1) were much higher than those reported during early phases of coccolithophore blooms in natural conditions, but similar to those during peak and declining coocolithophorid blooms reported in mesocosms. Total alkalinity anomalies with respect to conservative mixing (ΔTA) down to -49 μmol kg-1 are consistent with the occurrence of biogenic precipitation of calcite, while pCO2 remained 15 to 107 μatm lower than atmospheric equilibrium (372 μatm). The correlation between ΔTA and pCO2 suggested that pCO2 increased in part due to calcification, but this increase was insufficient to overcome the background under-saturation of CO2. This is related to the biogeochemical history of the water masses due to net carbon fixation by the successive phytoplankton 2 [less ▲]

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