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See detailAir-Sea Interactions of Natural Long-Lived Greenhouse Gases (CO2, N2O, CH4) in a Changing Climate
Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Bange, Hermann W.; Gruber, Nicolas et al

in Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions of Gases and Particles (2014)

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See detailTransfer across the air-sea interface
Garbe; Rutgersson, Anna; Boutin, Jacqueline et al

in Liss, Peter; Johnson, Martin (Eds.) Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions of Gases and Particles (2014)

The efficiency of transfer of gases and particles across the air-sea interface is controlled by several physical, biological and chemical processes in the atmosphere and water which are described here ... [more ▼]

The efficiency of transfer of gases and particles across the air-sea interface is controlled by several physical, biological and chemical processes in the atmosphere and water which are described here (including waves, large- and small-scale turbulence, bubbles, sea spray, rain and surface films). For a deeper understanding of relevant transport mechanisms, several models have been developed, ranging from conceptual models to numerical models. Most frequently the transfer is described by various functional dependencies of the wind speed, but more detailed descriptions need additional information. The study of gas transfer mechanisms uses a variety of experimental methods ranging from laboratory studies to carbon budgets, mass balance methods, micrometeorological techniques and thermographic techniques. Different methods resolve the transfer at different scales of time and space; this is important to take into account when comparing different results. Air-sea transfer is relevant in a wide range of applications, for example, local and regional fluxes, global models, remote sensing and computations of global inventories. The sensitivity of global models to the description of transfer velocity is limited; it is however likely that the formulations are more important when the resolution increases and other processes in models are improved. For global flux estimates using inventories or remote sensing products the accuracy of the transfer formulation as well as the accuracy of the wind field is crucial. [less ▲]

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See detailShort-term variability in bacterial abundance, cell properties, and incorporation of leucine and thymidine in subarctic sea ice
Kaartokallio, H.; Søgaard, D.H.; Norman, L. et al

in Aquatic Microbial Ecology (2013), 71

Sea ice is a biome of immense size and provides a range of habitats for diverse microbial communities many of which are adapted to living at low temperatures and high salinities in brines. We measured ... [more ▼]

Sea ice is a biome of immense size and provides a range of habitats for diverse microbial communities many of which are adapted to living at low temperatures and high salinities in brines. We measured simultaneous incorporation of thymidine (TdR) and leucine (Leu), bacterial cell abundance and cell population properties (by flow cytometry) in subarctic sea ice in SW Greenland. Short-term temporal variability was moderate, and steep environmental gradients, typical for sea ice, were the main drivers of the variability in bacterial cell properties and activity. Low nucleic acid (LNA) bacteria, previously linked to oligotrophic ecotypes in marine habitats, were more abundant in the upper ice layers, whereas High nucleic acid (HNA) bacteria dominated in lower ice, where organic carbon was in high concentrations. Leucine incorporation was saturated at micro molar concentrations, as known from freshwater and marine biofilm systems. Leu:TdR ratios were high (up to >300) in lowermost ice layers and when they are compared to published respiration measurements these results suggest non-specific leucine incorporation. There was evidence of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) containing bacteria in the sea ice, shown by brightly fluorescing intracellular inclusions after Nile Blue A staining. High leucine saturating concentrations coupled with the occurrence of PHA producing organisms further highlight the similarity of sea ice internal habitats to biofilm-like systems rather than to open-water systems. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of sea ice in global biogeochemical cycles: Emerging views and challenges
Vancoppenolle, M; Meiners, K.M.; Michel, C. et al

in Quaternary Science Reviews (2013), 79

Observations from the last decade suggest an important role of sea ice in the global biogeochemical cycles, promoted by (i) active biological and chemical processes within the sea ice; (ii) fluid and gas ... [more ▼]

Observations from the last decade suggest an important role of sea ice in the global biogeochemical cycles, promoted by (i) active biological and chemical processes within the sea ice; (ii) fluid and gas exchanges at the sea ice interface through an often permeable sea ice cover; and (iii) tight physical, biological and chemical interactions between the sea ice, the ocean and the atmosphere. Photosynthetic micro-organisms in sea ice thrive in liquid brine inclusions encased in a pure ice matrix, where they find suitable light and nutrient levels. They extend the production season, provide a winter and early spring food source, and contribute to organic carbon export to depth. Under-ice and ice edge phytoplankton blooms occur when ice retreats, favoured by increasing light, stratification, and by the release of material into the water column. In particular, the release of iron – highly concentrated in sea ice – could have large effects in the iron-limited Southern Ocean. The export of inorganic carbon transport by brine sinking below the mixed layer, calcium carbonate precipitation in sea ice, as well as active iceatmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, could play a central role in the marine carbon cycle. Sea ice processes could also significantly contribute to the sulphur cycle through the large production by ice algae of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), the precursor of sulfate aerosols, which as cloud condensation nuclei have a potential cooling effect on the planet. Finally, the sea ice zone supports significant ocean-atmosphere methane (CH4) fluxes, while saline ice surfaces activate springtime atmospheric bromine chemistry, setting ground for tropospheric ozone depletion events observed near both poles. All these mechanisms are generally known, but neither precisely understood nor quantified at large scales. As polar regions are rapidly changing, understanding the large-scale polar marine biogeochemical processes and their future evolution is of high priority. Earth system models should in this context prove essential, but they currently represent sea ice as biologically and chemically inert. Paleoclimatic proxies are also relevant, in particular the sea ice proxies, inferring past sea ice conditions from glacial and marine sediment core records and providing analogs for future changes. Being highly constrained by marine biogeochemistry, sea ice proxies would not only contribute to but also benefit from a better understanding of polar marine biogeochemical cycles. [less ▲]

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See detailTraces and Tracers: Selected papers from the Joint Liège Colloquium on Ocean Dynamics - Bonus- GoodHope - Geotraces meeting
Grégoire, Marilaure ULg; Anderson, Bob; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Book published by Elsevier Science (2013)

The 43rd International Liege Colloquium on Ocean Dynamics (http://modb.oce.ulg.ac.be/colloquium/) gathered a hundred scientists from around the world to discuss new developments and insights related to ... [more ▼]

The 43rd International Liege Colloquium on Ocean Dynamics (http://modb.oce.ulg.ac.be/colloquium/) gathered a hundred scientists from around the world to discuss new developments and insights related to tracers and proxies (from temperature and salinity to gases and isotopes) with a particular attention on the use of Trace Elements and Isotopes (TEI) as tracers. The colloquium was organized in connection with the Geotraces program (an ongoing international study of the global marine biogeochemical cycles of trace elements and their isotopes, http://www.geotraces.org/) and was the occasion to present the wealth of data collected during large oceanographic expeditions that occurred in connection with the International Polar year. In this framework, particular emphasis was given to the BONUS-GoodHope project, a multi-disciplinary oceanographic cruise that coupled full-depth ocean and atmosphere physical and biogeochemical observations, including trace metals and isotopes (Speich et al. 2013; Speich et al. 2008). [less ▲]

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See detailFirst estimates of the contribution of CaCO3 precipitation to the release of CO2 to the atmosphere during young sea ice growth
Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier ULg; Carnat, Gauthier; Dieckmann, G.S. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Oceans (2013), 118(1-12), 244-255

We report measurements of pH, total alkalinity, air-ice CO2 fluxes (chamber method) and CaCO3 content of frost flowers (FF) and thin landfast sea ice. As the temperature decreases, concentration of ... [more ▼]

We report measurements of pH, total alkalinity, air-ice CO2 fluxes (chamber method) and CaCO3 content of frost flowers (FF) and thin landfast sea ice. As the temperature decreases, concentration of solutes in the brine skim (BS) increases. Along this gradual concentration process, some salts reach their solubility threshold and start precipitating. The precipitation of ikaite (CaCO3.6H2O) was confirmed in the FF and throughout the ice by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray analysis. The amount of ikaite precipitated was estimated to be 25 µmol kg-1 melted FF, in the FF and is shown to decrease from 19 µmol kg-1 to 15 µmol kg-1 melted ice in the upper part and at the bottom of the ice, respectively. CO2 release due to precipitation of CaCO3 is estimated to be 50 µmol kg-1 melted samples. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) normalized to a salinity of 10 exhibits significant depletion in the upper layer of the ice and in the FF. This DIC loss is estimated to be 2069 µmol kg-1 melted sample and corresponds to a CO2 release from the ice to the atmosphere ranging from 20 to 40 mmol m-2 d-1. This estimate is consistent with flux measurements of air-ice CO2 exchange. Our measurements confirm previous laboratory findings that growing young sea ice acts as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. CaCO3 precipitation during early ice growth appears to promote the release of CO2 to the atmosphere however its contribution to the overall release by newly formed ice is most likely minor. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigations on physical and textural properties of Arctic first-year sea ice in the Amundsen Gulf, Canada, November 2007–June 2008 (IPY-CFL system study)
Carnat, Gauthier; Papakyriakou, Timothy; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier ULg et al

in Journal of Glaciology (2013), 59(217),

We report sea-ice temperature and bulk salinity measurements as well as textural analysis from 33 first-year drift- and fast-ice stations sampled between November 2007 and June 2008 in the southern ... [more ▼]

We report sea-ice temperature and bulk salinity measurements as well as textural analysis from 33 first-year drift- and fast-ice stations sampled between November 2007 and June 2008 in the southern Beaufort Sea–Amundsen Gulf, Canadian Arctic, during the International Polar Year Circumpolar Flaw Lead (IPY-CFL) system study. We use this significant dataset to investigate the halothermodynamic evolution of sea ice from growth to melt. A strong desalination phase is observed over a small time window in the spring. Using calculated proxies of sea-ice permeability (brine volume fraction) and of the intensity of brine convection (Rayleigh number) we demonstrate that this phase corresponds to full-depth gravity drainage initiated by a restored connectivity of the brine network with warming in the spring. Most stations had a textural sequence typical of Arctic first-year ice, with granular ice overlying columnar ice. Unusual textural features were observed sporadically: sandwiched granular ice, platelet ice and draped platelet ice. We suggest that turbulence in leads and double diffusion in strong brine plumes following the refreeze of cracks are plausible mechanisms for the formation of these textures. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysical and biogeochemical properties in landfast sea ice (Barrow, Alaska): insights on brine and gas dynamics across seasons
Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Delille, Bruno ULg; Eicken, H. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research (2013), 118(6), 3172-3189

The impacts of the seasonal evolution of sea-ice physical properties on ice-ocean biogeochemical exchanges were investigated in landfast ice at Barrow (Alaska) from January through June 2009. Three stages ... [more ▼]

The impacts of the seasonal evolution of sea-ice physical properties on ice-ocean biogeochemical exchanges were investigated in landfast ice at Barrow (Alaska) from January through June 2009. Three stages of brine dynamics across the annual cycle have been identified based on brine salinity, brine volume fraction and porous medium Rayleigh number [less ▲]

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See detailBiogenic silica recycling in sea ice inferred from Si-isotopes: constraints from Arctic winter first-year sea ice
Fripiat, François; Tison, Jean-Louis; André, Luc et al

in Biogeochemistry (2013)

We report silicon isotopic composition (d30Si vs. NBS28) in Arctic sea ice, based on sampling of silicic acid from both brine and seawater in a small Greenlandic bay in March 2010. Our measurements show ... [more ▼]

We report silicon isotopic composition (d30Si vs. NBS28) in Arctic sea ice, based on sampling of silicic acid from both brine and seawater in a small Greenlandic bay in March 2010. Our measurements show that just before the productive period, d30Si of sea-ice brine similar to d30Si of the underlying seawater. Hence, there is no Si isotopic fractionation during sea-ice growth by physical processes such as brine convection. This finding brings credit and support to the conclusions of previous work on the impact of biogenic processes on sea ice d30Si: any d30Si change results from a combination of biogenic silica production and dissolution. We use this insight to interpret data from an earlier study of sea-ice d30Si in Antarctic pack ice that show a large accumulation of biogenic silica. Based on these data, we estimate a significant contribution of biogenic silica dissolution (D) to production (P), with a D:P ratio between 0.4 and 0.9. This finding has significant implications for the understanding and parameterization of the sea ice Sibiogeochemical cycle, i.e. previous studies assumed little or no biogenic silica dissolution in sea ice. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of melting Antarctic sea ice on the fate of microbial communities studied in microcosms
Lannuzel, D.; Schoenmann, V.; Dumont, I. et al

in Polar Biology (2013), 36(10), 1483-1497

Although algal growth in the iron-deficient Southern Ocean surface waters is generally low, there is considerable evidence that winter sea ice contains high amounts of iron and organic matter leading to ... [more ▼]

Although algal growth in the iron-deficient Southern Ocean surface waters is generally low, there is considerable evidence that winter sea ice contains high amounts of iron and organic matter leading to ice-edge blooms during austral spring. We used field observations and ship-based microcosm experiments to study the effect of the seeding by sea ice microorganisms, and the fertilization by organic matter and iron on the planktonic community at the onset of spring/summer in the Weddell Sea. Pack ice was a major source of autotrophs resulting in a ninefold to 27-fold increase in the sea ice-fertilized seawater microcosm compared to the ice-free seawater microcosm. However, heterotrophs were released in lower numbers (only a 2- to 6-fold increase). Pack ice was also an important source of dissolved organic matter for the planktonic community. Small algae (<10 μm) and bacteria released from melting sea ice were able to thrive in seawater. Field observations show that the supply of iron from melting sea ice had occurred well before our arrival onsite, and the supply of iron to the microcosms was therefore low. We finally ran a “sequential melting” experiment to monitor the release of ice constituents in seawater. Brine drainage occurred first and was associated with the release of dissolved elements (salts, dissolved organic carbon and dissolved iron). Particulate organic carbon and particulate iron were released with low-salinity waters at a later stage. [less ▲]

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See detailParticle export during a bloom of Emiliania huxleyi in the North-West European continental margin
Schmidt, S.; Harlay, Jérôme ULg; Borges, Alberto ULg et al

in Journal of Marine Systems (2013), 109-110

Coccolithophores, the dominant pelagic calcifiers in the oceans, play a key role in the marine carbon cycle through calcification, primary production and carbon export, the main rivers of the biological ... [more ▼]

Coccolithophores, the dominant pelagic calcifiers in the oceans, play a key role in the marine carbon cycle through calcification, primary production and carbon export, the main rivers of the biological CO2 pump. In May 2002 a cruise was conducted on the outer shelf of the North West European continental margin, from the north Bay of Biscay to the Celtic Sea (47.0°-50.5°N, 5.0°-11.0°W), an area where massive blooms of Emiliania huxleyi are observed annually. Biogeochemical variables including primary production, calcification, partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), particle load, particulate organic and inorganic carbon (POC, PIC) and 234Th, were measured in surface waters to assess particle dynamic and carbon export in relation to the development of a coccolithophore bloom. We observed a marked northward decrease in Chl-a concentration and calcification rates: the bloom exhibited lower values and may less well developed in the Goban Spur area. The export fluxes of POC and PIC from the top 80 m, determined using the ratios of POC and PIC to 234Th of particles, ranged from 81 to 323 mgC m-2 d-1 and from 30 to 84 mgC m-2 d-1, respectively. The highest fluxes were observed in waters presenting a well-developed coccolithophore bloom, as shown by high reflectance of surface waters. This experiment confirms that the occurrence of coccolithophores promotes efficient export of organic and inorganic carbon on the North-West European margin. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling argon dynamics in first-year sea ice
Moreau, S.; Vancoppenolle, M.; Tison, J.-L. et al

Poster (2012, July)

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See detailGas migration in sea ice: from observations to modelling
Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Moreau, Sébastien; Vancoppenolle, Martin et al

Poster (2012, May 07)

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See detailFluxes of dimethylsulfide from warming sea ice
Carnat, Gauthier; Zhou, Jiayun; Papakyriakou, Tim et al

Poster (2012, May)

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See detailSea ice as a source of bioavailable iron to the Southern Ocean
Schoemann, Véronique; Lannuzel, Delphine; de Jong et al

Conference (2012, May)

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See detailInorganic carbon dynamics in coastal arctic sea ice and related air-ice CO2 exchanges
Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier ULg; Tison, J.-L.; Carnat, G. et al

Poster (2012, April)

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See detailHow convection and diffusion processes might affect biological imprints, a challenge for modelers
Tison, J.-L.; Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Thomas, D. et al

Conference (2012, April)

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See detailDynamics of pCO2 and related air-ice CO2 fluxes in the Arctic coastal zone (Amundsen Gulf, Beaufort Sea)
Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier ULg; Carnat, G.; Papakyriakou, T. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Oceans (2012), 117(C00G10),

We present an Arctic seasonal survey of carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) dynamics within sea ice brine and related air-ice CO2 fluxes. The survey was carried out from early spring to the beginning ... [more ▼]

We present an Arctic seasonal survey of carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) dynamics within sea ice brine and related air-ice CO2 fluxes. The survey was carried out from early spring to the beginning of summer in the Arctic coastal waters of the Amundsen Gulf. High concentrations of pCO2 (up to 1834 matm) were observed in the sea ice in early April as a consequence of concentration of solutes in brines, CaCO3 precipitation and microbial respiration. CaCO3 precipitation was detected through anomalies in total alkalinity (TA) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). This precipitation seems to have occurred in highly saline brine in the upper part of the ice cover and in bulk ice. As summer draws near, the ice temperature increases and brine pCO2 shifts from a large supersaturation (1834 matm) to a marked undersaturation (down to almost 0 matm). This decrease was ascribed to brine dilution by ice meltwater, dissolution of CaCO3 and photosynthesis during the sympagic algal bloom. The magnitude of the CO2 fluxes was controlled by ice temperature (through its control on brine volume and brine channels connectivity) and the concentration gradient between brine and the atmosphere. However, the state of the ice-interface clearly affects air-ice CO2 fluxes. [less ▲]

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See detailVariability of carbon dioxide and methane in the epilimnion of Lake Kivu
Borges, Alberto ULg; Bouillon, S.; Abril, G. et al

in Descy, J.-P.; Darchambeau, François; Schmid, M. (Eds.) Lake Kivu: Limnology and biogeochemistry of a tropical great lake (2012)

We report a dataset of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and me-thane concentrations (CH4) in the surface waters of Lake Kivu ob-tained during four cruises covering the two main seasons (rainy and dry ... [more ▼]

We report a dataset of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and me-thane concentrations (CH4) in the surface waters of Lake Kivu ob-tained during four cruises covering the two main seasons (rainy and dry). Spatial gradients of surface pCO2 and CH4 concentrations were modest in the main basin. In Kabuno Bay, pCO2 and CH4 concentra-tions in surface waters were higher, owing to the stronger influence of subaquatic springs from depth. Seasonal variations of pCO2 and CH4 in the main basin of Lake Kivu were strongly driven by deepen-ing of the epilimnion and the resulting entrainment of water charac-terized by higher pCO2 and CH4 concentrations. Physical and chem-ical vertical patterns in Kabuno Bay were seasonally stable, owing to a stronger stratification and smaller surface area inducing fetch limi-tation of wind driven turbulence. A global and regional cross-system comparison of pCO2 and CH4 concentrations in surface waters of lakes highlights the peculiarity of Kabuno Bay in terms of pCO2 values in surface waters. In terms of surface CH4 concentrations, both Kabuno Bay and the main basin of Lake Kivu are at the lower end of values in lakes globally, despite the huge amounts of CH4 and CO2 in the deeper layers of the lake. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a method for high vertical resolution measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 within bulk sea ice
Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier ULg; Delille, Bruno ULg; Verbeke, Véronique et al

in Journal of Glaciology (2012), 58(208), 287-300

Fluxes of atmospheric CO2 have been reported over sea ice during winter and spring. These fluxes are partly driven by the gradient of the CO2 concentration between sea ice and the atmosphere. We present a ... [more ▼]

Fluxes of atmospheric CO2 have been reported over sea ice during winter and spring. These fluxes are partly driven by the gradient of the CO2 concentration between sea ice and the atmosphere. We present a new non-destructive method to measure the pCO2 of bulk sea ice at its in situ temperature. This method is based on an equilibration procedure between sea ice and a standard gas of known CO2 concentration. The concentration is measured by gas chromatography with a precision of 5%. Tests were performed on artificial standard sea ice and confirmed the reproducibility of the technique in the range of precision of the gas chromatograph. To test the accuracy of this method, the first profiles of pCO2 measured in bulk sea ice are reported and compared with direct in situ measurements of brine pCO2 over depth-integrated intervals. [less ▲]

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