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See detailSea ice pCO2 dynamics and related air-ice CO2 fluxes during a flood-freeze cycle (Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica)
Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier ULg; Tison, Jean Louis; Carnat, Gauthier et al

Poster (2008, April)

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See detailA mathematical modelling of bloom of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi in a mesocosm experiment
Joassin, Pascal ULg; Delille, Bruno ULg; Soetaert, K. et al

in Biogeosciences Discussions (2008), 5

A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical variables and processes observed during a bloom of Emiliania huxleyi coccolithophore. This bloom was induced in a mesocosm experiment during ... [more ▼]

A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical variables and processes observed during a bloom of Emiliania huxleyi coccolithophore. This bloom was induced in a mesocosm experiment during which the ecosystem development was followed over a period of 23-days through changes in various biogeochemical parameters such as inorganic nutrients (nitrate, ammonium and phosphate), total alkalinity (TA), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), partial pressure of CO[SUB]2[/SUB] (pCO[SUB]2[/SUB]), dissolved oxygen (O[SUB]2[/SUB]), photosynthetic pigments, particulate organic carbon (POC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP), primary production, and calcification. This dynamic model is based on unbalanced algal growth and balanced bacterial growth. In order to adequately reproduce the observations, the model includes an explicit description of phosphorus cycling, calcification, TEP production and an enhanced mortality due to viral lysis. The model represented carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus fluxes observed in the mesocosms. Modelled profiles of algal biomass and final concentrations of DIC and nutrients are in agreement with the experimental observations. [less ▲]

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See detailIron study during a time series in the western Weddell pack ice
Lannuzel, Delphine; Schoemann, Veronique; de Jong, Jeroen et al

in Marine Chemistry (2008), 108(1-2), 85-95

Samples of sea ice, snow, brine and underlying seawater were collected in the western Weddell pack ice at the ISPOL drifting station (Ice Station POLarstern, 68 degrees S/55 degrees W) in spring-summer ... [more ▼]

Samples of sea ice, snow, brine and underlying seawater were collected in the western Weddell pack ice at the ISPOL drifting station (Ice Station POLarstern, 68 degrees S/55 degrees W) in spring-summer period (November 2004-January 2005). Total-dissolvable, dissolved and particulate Fe concentrations in the sea ice environment were determined every 5 days during the time series, together with relevant physical, chemical and biological parameters. From 29 November to 30 December, a decrease in all forms of Fe measured was observed, likely to be the result of enhanced ice permeability as summer proceeds. At the beginning of the time series, melting of the upper ice layer took place together with brine drainage process. This would enable the seeding of Fe from the ice matrix towards the upper water column below. 70% of this Fe was supplied during the first 10 days of the survey, while the ice cover is still present. Flux estimates from the sampled area furthermore highlight the relevant role of the pack ice in the biogeochemical cycle of Fe in the western Weddell Sea. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailInter-annual variability of the carbon dioxide oceanic sink south of Tasmania
Borges, Alberto ULg; Tilbrook, B.; Metzl, N. et al

in Biogeosciences (2008), 5(1), 141-155

We compiled a large data-set from 22 cruises spanning from 1991 to 2003, of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO(2)) in surface waters over the continental shelf (CS) and adjacent open ocean (43 degrees to 46 ... [more ▼]

We compiled a large data-set from 22 cruises spanning from 1991 to 2003, of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO(2)) in surface waters over the continental shelf (CS) and adjacent open ocean (43 degrees to 46 degrees S; 145 degrees to 150 degrees E), south of Tasmania. Climatological seasonal cycles of pCO(2) in the CS, the subtropical zone (STZ) and the subAntarctic zone (SAZ) are described and used to determine monthly pCO(2) anomalies. These are used in combination with monthly anomalies of sea surface temperature (SST) to investigate inter-annual variations of SST and pCO(2). Monthly anomalies of SST (as intense as 2 degrees C) are apparent in the CS, STZ and SAZ, and are indicative of strong inter-annual variability that seems to be related to large-scale coupled atmosphere-ocean oscillations. Anomalies of pCO(2) normalized to a constant temperature are negatively related to SST anomalies. A reduced winter-time vertical input of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) during phases of positive SST anomalies, related to a poleward shift of westerly winds, and a concomitant local decrease in wind stress is the likely cause of the negative relationship between pCO(2) and SST anomalies. The observed pattern is an increase of the sink for atmospheric CO2 associated with positive SST anomalies, although strongly modulated by inter-annual variability of wind speed. Assuming that phases of positive SST anomalies are indicative of the future evolution of regional ocean biogeochemistry under global warming, we show using a purely observational based approach that some provinces of the Southern Ocean could provide a potential negative feedback on increasing atmospheric CO2. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of CO2 on particle size distribution and phytoplankton abundance during a mesocosm bloom experiment (PeECE II)
Engel, Anja; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U. et al

in Biogeosciences (2008), 5(2), 509-521

The influence of seawater carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on the size distribution of suspended particles (2-60 mu m) and on phytoplankton abundance was investigated during a mesocosm experiment at the ... [more ▼]

The influence of seawater carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on the size distribution of suspended particles (2-60 mu m) and on phytoplankton abundance was investigated during a mesocosm experiment at the large scale facility (LFS) in Bergen, Norway, in the frame of the Pelagic Ecosystem CO2 Enrichment study (PeECE II). In nine outdoor enclosures the partial pressure of CO2 in seawater was modified by an aeration system to simulate past (similar to 190 mu atm CO2), present (similar to 370 mu atm CO2) and future (similar to 700 mu atm CO2) CO2 conditions in triplicates. Due to the initial addition of inorganic nutrients, phytoplankton blooms developed in all mesocosms and were monitored over a period of 19 days. Seawater samples were collected daily for analysing the abundance of suspended particles and phytoplankton with the Coulter Counter and with Flow Cytometry, respectively. During the bloom period, the abundance of small particles (< 4 mu m) significantly increased at past, and decreased at future CO2 levels. At that time, a direct relationship between the total-surface-to-total-volume ratio of suspended particles and DIC concentration was determined for all mesocosms. Significant changes with respect to the CO2 treatment were also observed in the phytoplankton community structure. While some populations such as diatoms seemed to be insensitive to the CO2 treatment, others like Micromonas spp. increased with CO2, or showed maximum abundance at present day CO2 (i.e. Emiliania huxleyi). The strongest response to CO2 was observed in the abundance of small autotrophic nano-plankton that strongly increased during the bloom in the past CO2 mesocosms. Together, changes in particle size distribution and phytoplankton community indicate a complex interplay between the ability of the cells to physiologically respond to changes in CO2 and size selection. Size of cells is of general importance for a variety of processes in marine systems such as diffusion-limited uptake of substrates, resource allocation, predator-prey interaction, and gravitational settling. The observed changes in particle size distribution are therefore discussed with respect to biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. [less ▲]

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See detailTemporal evolution of decaying summer first-year sea ice in the Western Weddell Sea, Antarctica
Tison, J. L.; Worby, A.; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

in Deep-Sea Research Part II, Topical Studies in Oceanography (2008), 55(8-9), 975-987

The evolution of the main physico-chemical properties of the unflooded 90-cm-thick first-year sea-ice cover at the Ice Station POLarstern (ISPOL) "clean site" is described. ISPOL was an international ... [more ▼]

The evolution of the main physico-chemical properties of the unflooded 90-cm-thick first-year sea-ice cover at the Ice Station POLarstern (ISPOL) "clean site" is described. ISPOL was an international experiment of the German research icebreaker R.V. Polarstern. The vessel was anchored to an ice floe for an observation period of 5 weeks, during the early summer melt onset in the Western Weddell Sea. The "clean site" was specially designed and accessed so as to prevent any trace metal contamination of the sampling area. Observations were made at 5-day intervals during December 2004 in the central part of the main floe. Results show the succession of two contrasting phases in the behavior of the brine network (brine channels, pockets, and tubes). Initially, brine salinity was higher than that of sea-water, leading to brine migration and a decrease in the mean bulk salinity of the ice cover. This process is highly favored by the already high bulk porosity (14%), which ensures full connectivity of the brine network. Gravity drainage rather than convection seems to be the dominant brine transfer process. Half-way through the observation period, the brine salinity became lower than that of the sea-water throughout the ice column. The brine network therefore switched to a "stratified" regime in which exchange with sea-water was limited to molecular diffusion, strongly stabilizing the bulk mean sea-ice salinity. During the transition between the two regimes, and in areas closer to ridges, slush water (resulting from a mixture of snow meltwater and sea water accumulated at the snow-ice interface) penetrated through the growing "honeycomb-like structure" and replaced the downward draining brines. This resulted in a slight local replenishment of nutrients (as indicated by dissolved silicic acid). However, as a whole, the described decaying regime in this globally unflooded location with limited snow cover should be unfavorable to the development of healthy and active surface and internal microbial communities. The switch from gravity to diffusion controlled transport mechanisms within the ice column also should affect the efficiency of gas exchange across the sea-ice cover. The observed late build-up of a continuous, impermeable, superimposed ice layer should further significantly hamper gas exchange. Statistical estimates of the evolution of the ice thickness during the observation period and salinity trends of the under-ice water salinity down to 30m corroborate model predictions of a moderate bottom melting (5-10cm) from ocean heat fluxes. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailInter-annual variability of the carbon dioxide oceanic sink south of Tasmania
Borges, Alberto ULg; Tilbrook, B.; Metzl, N. et al

Poster (2008)

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See detailSeasonal variability of CO2 fluxes in the tropical lagoons of Ivory Coast
Koné, Y. J. M.; Gourene, G.; Abril, G. et al

Poster (2008)

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See detailA dynamic model of an experimental bloom of coccolithophores Emiliania huxleyi
Joassin, Pascal ULg; Borges, Alberto ULg; Chou, Lei et al

Conference (2007, November 27)

A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical events observed during an experimentally induced bloom of coccolithophores Emiliania huxleyi. This bloom occurred in a mesocosm experiment ... [more ▼]

A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical events observed during an experimentally induced bloom of coccolithophores Emiliania huxleyi. This bloom occurred in a mesocosm experiment (Bergen 2001 experiment) during which ecosystem development was followed over a 23-days period through changes of the stocks of inorganic nutrients (nitrate, ammonium and phosphate), dissolved inorganic carbon and pCO2, O2 concentration, pigments, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, dissolved organic carbon, the production of Transparent Exopolymeric Particles (TEP), primary production, alkalinity, calcification and particulate inorganic carbon. The dynamic model is based on unbalanced algal growth and balanced growth for bacteria as described in Van den Meersche et al. (2004). In addition, in order to adequately reproduce the observations, the model has been extended by including an explicit description of calcification, T.E.P production and an enhanced mortality due to viruses. This last process, based on a critical promiscuity between cellular hosts and viral agents, successfully contributed to reproduce the bloom extinction as observed in the mesocosm experiment. This model will be implemented in a coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the Black Sea ecosystem in the framework of the EU Sesame project and in the Gulf of Biscay in the frame of the Belgian PEACE project. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanktonic Archaea in Lake Kivu
Llirós, Marc; Darchambeau, François ULg; Plasencia, Anna et al

Conference (2007, September 02)

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See detailBiogeochemistry of a late coccolithophorid bloom at the continental margin of the Bay of Biscay
Harlay, Jérôme ULg; De Bodt, Caroline; d'Hoop, Quentin et al

Poster (2007, July 02)

Recent findings have led to growing concern regarding the impact of ocean acidification on marine calcifyers, but little is known about their biogeochemistry in natural (field) conditions (a major but ... [more ▼]

Recent findings have led to growing concern regarding the impact of ocean acidification on marine calcifyers, but little is known about their biogeochemistry in natural (field) conditions (a major but overlooked pre-requisite for realistic modelling of the future evolution of marine C cycling in a high CO2 world). The changes that will undergo these species in the near future and the biological feedback to decreasing oceanic pH are still open to debate. Coccolithophores, among which Emiliania huxleyi (Ehux) is the most abundant and widespread species, are the dominant calcifying phytoplankton in the subpolar and temperate zones of the worlds oceans. Within the framework of the Climate and Atmosphere Belgian Federal Science Policy Office programme, the continental margin of the Northern Bay of Biscay (North Atlantic Ocean) was visited in June 2006 during a transdisciplinary investigation of a late-spring bloom dominated by Ehux. Remote sensing images, transmitted onboard on a daily basis, were of valuable significance to pinpoint the coccolithophorid bloom along the margin, and to sample stations with contrasted biogeochemical properties.We determined 14C-based primary production and calcification rates, as well as pelagic respiration rates (O2 incubations). The magnitude of the biological and carbonate carbon fluxes will be synthesized and discussed in the light of biogeochemical parameters, such as Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP), chlorophyll-a, particulate carbon concentrations, particle dynamics and particulate organic carbon export (deduced from 234Th fluxes). Additional information on the bloom biogeochemistry will be presented (activity of dissolved esterase enzymes and bacterial community structure) to emphasize the importance of coccolithophorid blooms in the contemporary carbon cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasurement of the partial pressure of CO2 in bulk sea ice
Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier ULg; Verbeke, Véronique; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Poster (2007, July)

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See detailBiogas (CO2, O-2, dimethylsulfide) dynamics in spring Antarctic fast ice
Delille, Bruno ULg; Jourdain, B.; Borges, Alberto ULg et al

in Limnology and Oceanography (2007), 52(4), 1367-1379

We studied the temporal variations of CO2, O-2, and dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentrations within three environments (sea-ice brine, platelet ice-like layer, and underlying water) in the coastal area of ... [more ▼]

We studied the temporal variations of CO2, O-2, and dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentrations within three environments (sea-ice brine, platelet ice-like layer, and underlying water) in the coastal area of Adelie Land, Antarctica, during spring 1999 before ice breakup. Temporal changes were different among the three environments, while similar temporal trends were observed within each environment at all stations. The underlying water was always undersaturated in O-2 (around 85%) and oversaturated in CO2 at the deepest stations. O-2 concentrations increased in sea-ice brine as it melted, reaching oversaturation up to 160% due to the primary production by the sea-ice algae community (chlorophyll a in the bottom ice reached concentrations up to 160 mu g L-1 of bulk ice). In parallel, DMS concentrations increased up to 60 nmol L-1 within sea- ice brine and the platelet ice- like layer. High biological activity consumed CO2 and promoted the decrease of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO(2)). In addition, melting of pure ice crystals and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) dissolution promoted the shift from a state of CO2 oversaturation to a state of marked CO2 undersaturation (pCO(2) < 30 dPa). On the whole, our results suggest that late spring land fast sea ice can potentially act as a sink of CO2 and a source of DMS for the neighbouring environments, i.e., the underlying water or/ and the atmosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanktonic Archaea in Lake Kivu
Llirós, Marc; Darchambeau, François ULg; Plasencia, Anna et al

Conference (2007, June 12)

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See detailCarbon dioxide fluxes in Lake Kivu
Borges, Alberto ULg; Delille, Bruno ULg; Descy, Jean-Pierre et al

Conference (2007, June 12)

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See detailDedication - Michel Frankignoulle
Borges, Alberto ULg; Delille, Bruno ULg

in Journal of Marine Systems (2007), 66(1-4), 4-5

Detailed reference viewed: 174 (9 ULg)