References of "De Pauw, Edwin"
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See detailOrganized proteomic heterogeneity in colorectal liver metastases and implications for therapies
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg; Debois, Delphine ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2014, March), 77(1), 07

Introduction : Tumor heterogeneity is a major obstacle for developing effective anti-cancer treatments. Recent studies have pointed at large stochastic genetic heterogeneity within cancer lesions, where ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Tumor heterogeneity is a major obstacle for developing effective anti-cancer treatments. Recent studies have pointed at large stochastic genetic heterogeneity within cancer lesions, where no pattern seems to exist that would enable a more structured targeted therapy approach. Aim : Because to date no similar information is available at the protein (phenotype) level, we aimed at characterising the proteomic heterogeneity in human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) liver metastases. Methods & Results : We employed MALDI imaging-guided proteomics and explored the heterogeneity of extracellular distribution of over 1000 proteins we found unexpectedly that all liver metastasis lesions displayed a reproducible, zon- ally delineated, pattern of functional and therapeutic biomarker heterogeneity. Peritumoral region featured elevated lipid metabolism and protein synthesis, the rim of the metastasis displayed increased cellular growth, movement and drug metabolism whereas the center of the lesion was characterized by elevated carbohydrate metabolism and DNA- repair activity. From the aspect of therapeutic targeting zonal expression of known and novel biomarkers was evident, reinforcing the need to select several targets in order to achieve optimal coverage of the lesion. Finally we highlight two novel antigens, LTBP2 and TGFBI, whose expression is a consistent feature of CRC liver metastasis. Conclusions : proteome heterogeneity has a distinct, organized, pattern. This particular hallmark can now be used as a part of the strategy for developing rational therapies based on multiple sets of targetable antigens. [less ▲]

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See detailNew mass spectrometry based methodology to sequence a whole snake venom
Echterbille, Julien ULg; Boulanger, Madeleine; Degueldre, Michel ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 10)

Animal venoms are complex chemical cocktails, comprising wide ranges of biologically active reticulated peptides that target with high selectivity and efficacy varieties of membrane receptors. Assuming ... [more ▼]

Animal venoms are complex chemical cocktails, comprising wide ranges of biologically active reticulated peptides that target with high selectivity and efficacy varieties of membrane receptors. Assuming the fact that each of the 170,000 venomous species reported can produce more than 250 bioactive toxins, at least 40,000,000 bioactive peptides and proteins may be discovered. Among the four described species of mambas, Eastern Jameson’s mamba (Dendroaspis jamesonii kaimosae) venom is the less characterized since only 9 peptides are referenced in database. This work aims at developing a new strategy devoted to the deep analysis of animal venoms. Our approach consists in a first separation of the venom using cation exchange chromatography. Each primary fraction is then purified a second time by classical RP-HPLC. A total of 328 fractions, containing amongst 1 and 4 toxins, are finally collected. MALDI-MS analysis of each fraction is done in order (1) to obtain information about masses and (2) to obtain sequences of toxins thanks to MALDI-In Source Decay (ISD) dissociation coupled with on MALDI target plate reduction of the peptides. ISD has already been demonstrated efficient for toxin sequencing, and especially when using 1,5-DAN as reducing matrix. ISD yields to sequences that cover more than 50% of peptide sequences by series of singly charged c-type ions. Thanks to this methodology, we were able to obtain 85% of satisfactory results i.e. spectra giving quite long tags of amino acids (up to 20 residues). As a way to validate our method, a tag coming from ISD spectrum interpretation has found a match in database for an Eastern Jameson’s mamba toxin. The global sequence has then been obtained by extrapolation on the ISD spectrum. Since ISD spectra are simpler than classical MS/MS spectra, automation of spectra interpretation, difficult with other fragmentation techniques (CID, ETD…), is implementable. In the near future, sequences obtained with this approach will be used to direct tests of biological activity through sequence homologies with already known ligands for different kinds of membrane receptors. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolation of an amylolytic chrysophyte, Poterioochromonas sp. from the digestive tract of the termite R. santonensis
Tarayre, Cédric ULg; Bauwens, Julien ULg; Brasseur, Catherine ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2014), 18(1),

The aim of this work was the isolation and cultivation of amylolytic protists living in the digestive tract of the termite Reticulitermes santonensis (Feytaud). A chrysophyte identified as ... [more ▼]

The aim of this work was the isolation and cultivation of amylolytic protists living in the digestive tract of the termite Reticulitermes santonensis (Feytaud). A chrysophyte identified as Poterioochromonas sp. was isolated in a special medium containing rice grains as a source of carbon and nitrogen. Then, the protist was grown in a medium containing starch as a carbon source, tryptone, and a phosphate buffer at different pH values (5, 6 and 7). Yeast extract was added or not. Ciprofloxacin was used to avoid the bacterial development. Other antibiotics were also tested but showed an inhibitive effect on the growth of Poterioochromonas sp. Yeast extract allowed reaching 1.9 (pH 5), 2.3 (pH 6) and 2.2 (pH 7) times higher final cell concentrations, and 2.8 (pH 5), 2.8 (pH 6) and 2.2 (pH 7) times higher biomass yields. The starch concentration did not decrease in the medium until 3 and 4 days of culture, with and without yeast extract, respectively. Eight days of culture were necessary for hydrolyzing the starch completely, with and without yeast extract. Maltose and maltotriose were detected in the culture media and were hydrolyzed progressively. Maximal maltose concentrations were 0.68, 0.66 and 0.51 g.l-1 in the medium containing yeast extract. Maltotriose concentrations were only 0.17, 0.14 and 0.12 g.l-1. Other glucose oligomers were also detected but in lower quantities. It was determined that the protist developed a weak amylase activity, particularly at a weakly acidic pH (5-6). Such a pH also allowed a better growth of the protist. A maximal amylase activity of 112 nkat.l-1 was measured with yeast extract at pH 5. No other enzymatic activity (protease, cellulase or xylanase) was detected except amylase. The degradation products of starch which were obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis allow the identification of α-amylase, amyloglucosidase and possibly β-amylase activities. [less ▲]

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See detailInnovative analytical strategies for small molecules analysis by ion-mobility mass spectrometry
Eppe, Gauthier ULg; Goscinny, Séverine; Far, Johann ULg et al

Conference (2014, January)

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See detailInfluences of proline and cysteine residues on fragment yield in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry
Asakawa, Daiki; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg et al

in Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (2014)

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See detailComparison of two FFPE preparation methods using label-free shotgun proteomics: Application to tissues of diverticulitis patients.
Quesada-Calvo, Florence; Bertrand, Virginie ULg; Longuespée, Rémi ULg et al

in Journal of proteomics (2014), 112C

Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens of patients are useful sources of materials for clinical research and have recently gained interest for use in the discovery of clinical proteomic ... [more ▼]

Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens of patients are useful sources of materials for clinical research and have recently gained interest for use in the discovery of clinical proteomic biomarkers. However, the critical step in this field is the ability to obtain an efficient and repeatable extraction using the limited quantities of material available for research in hospital biobanks. This work describes the evaluation of the peptide/protein extraction using FFPE sections treated by the following two methods before shotgun proteomic analysis: a commercial solution (FFPE-FASP) (filter aided sample preparation) and an antigen retrieval-derived protocol (On Slice AR). Their efficiencies and repeatabilities are compared using data-independent differential quantitative label-free analysis. FFPE-FASP was shown to be globally better both qualitatively and quantitatively than On Slice AR. FFPE-FASP was tested on several samples, and differential analysis was used to compare the tissues of diverticulitis patients (healthy and inflammatory tissues). In this differential proteomic analysis using retrospective clinical FFPE material, FFPE-FASP was reproducible and provided a high number of confident protein identifications, highlighting potential protein biomarkers. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: In clinical proteomics, FFPE is an important resource for retrospective analysis and for the discovery of biomarkers. The challenge for FFPE shotgun proteomic analysis is preparation by an efficient and reproducible protocol, which includes protein extraction and digestion. In this study, we analyzed two different methods and evaluated their repeatabilities and efficiencies. We illustrated the reproducibility of the most efficient method, FFPE-FASP, by a pilot study on diverticulitis tissue and on FFPE samples amount accessible in hospital biobanks. These data showed that FFPE is suitable for use in clinical proteomics, especially when the FFPE-FASP method is combined with label-free shotgun proteomics as described in the workflow presented in this work. [less ▲]

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See detailBiointerface multiparametric study of intraocular lens acrylic materials.
Bertrand, Virginie ULg; Bozukova, Dimitriya; Svaldo Lanero, Tiziana et al

in Journal of cataract and refractive surgery (2014), 40(9), 1536-44

PURPOSE: To compare hydrophilic and hydrophobic acrylic materials designed for intraocular lenses in a multiparametric investigation in a liquid environment to highlight their properties in terms of ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: To compare hydrophilic and hydrophobic acrylic materials designed for intraocular lenses in a multiparametric investigation in a liquid environment to highlight their properties in terms of adhesion forces, lens epithelial cell (LEC) adhesion, and tissue response as indicators of the risk for posterior capsule opacification (PCO) development. SETTING: University of Liege, Liege, Belgium. DESIGN: Experimental study. METHODS: The hydrophobicity and surface adhesion force were assessed using contact-angle and atomic force microscopy measurements. The bioadhesiveness of the disks and the tissue response were determined by in vitro experiments using bovine serum albumin and porcine LECs and by in vivo rabbit subcutaneous implantation, respectively. RESULTS: Increasing surface hydrophobicity led to a greater surface-adhesion force and greater LEC adhesion. After 1 month, the rabbit subcutaneous implants showed a similar thin layer of fibrous capsule surrounding the disks without extensive inflammation. A layer of rounded cells in contact with disks was detected on the hydrophobic samples only. CONCLUSIONS: Hydrophobic acrylic disks that have been associated with a reduced risk for PCO in clinical studies showed increased tackiness. FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES: Proprietary or commercial disclosures are listed after the references. [less ▲]

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See detailTissue Proteomics for the Next Decade? Towards a Molecular Dimension in Histology
Longuespée, Rémi ULg; Fléron, Maximilien; Pottier, Charles et al

in OMICS : A Journal of Integrative Biology (2014)

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See detailMatrix ‐ assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy: An interesting complementary approach for lipid detection in biological tissues
Jadoul, Laure ULg; Malherbe, Cédric ULg; calligaris, David et al

in European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology [=EJLST] (2014)

Recently, matrix‐assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) has emerged as a powerful technique to study the distribution of lipids. However, quantification still remains a ... [more ▼]

Recently, matrix‐assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) has emerged as a powerful technique to study the distribution of lipids. However, quantification still remains a challenge because the MALDI signal is strongly affected by ion suppression effects. On the contrary, Raman spectroscopy is recognized as a non‐destructive analysis method and spectral images can also be acquired. The combination of these two techniques was applied for lipids detection in tissue sections. In MALDI, two lipids families (glycerophosphocholine, PC; gycerophosphoethanolamine, PE), three MALDI matrices (1,5‐diaminonapthalene, 1,5‐DAN; 2,5‐dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,5‐DHB; a‐4‐hydroxicinammic acid, CHCA), and various mixtures of lipids were investigated. The nature of the lipid, as well as the nature of the matrix and the composition of the sample influences the signal of a given lipid. In Raman, despite a strong overlap with the spectrum of the native tissue, an intensity profile constructed along the diameter of the section clearly shows that the signature of one given lipid (a glycerophosphocholine) can be detected on a doped biological sample. [less ▲]

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See detailBlocking lipid synthesis overcomes tumor re-growth and metastasis after anti-angiogenic therapy withdrawal.
Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg; Cimino, Jonathan ULg; BLACHER, Silvia ULg et al

in Cell Metabolism (2014), 20

The molecular mechanisms responsible for the failure of antiangiogenic therapies and how tumors adapt to these therapies are unclear. Here, we applied transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches ... [more ▼]

The molecular mechanisms responsible for the failure of antiangiogenic therapies and how tumors adapt to these therapies are unclear. Here, we applied transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches to preclinical models and provide evidence for tumor adaptation to vascular endothelial growth factor blockade through a metabolic shift toward carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in tumors. During sunitinib or sorafenib treatment, tumor growth was inhibited and tumors were hypoxic and glycolytic. In sharp contrast, treatment withdrawal led to tumor regrowth, angiogenesis restoration, moderate lactate production, and enhanced lipid synthesis. This metabolic shift was associated with a drastic increase in metastatic dissemination. Interestingly, pharmacological lipogenesis inhibition with orlistat or fatty acid synthase downregulation with shRNA inhibited tumor regrowth and metastases after sunitinib treatment withdrawal. Our data shed light on metabolic alterations that result in cancer adaptation to antiangiogenic treatments and identify key molecules involved in lipid metabolism as putative therapeutic targets. [less ▲]

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See detailFragmentation and isomerization due to field heating in traveling wave ion mobility
Morsa, Denis ULg; Gabelica, Valérie ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg

in Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (2014), 25(6), 1384-1393

During their travel inside a traveling wave ion mobility cell (TW IMS), ions are susceptible to heating because of the presence of high intensity electric fields. Here, we report effective temperatures T ... [more ▼]

During their travel inside a traveling wave ion mobility cell (TW IMS), ions are susceptible to heating because of the presence of high intensity electric fields. Here, we report effective temperatures T eff,vib obtained at the injection and inside the mobility cell of a SYNAPT G2 HDMS spectrometer for different probe ions: benzylpyridinium ions and leucine enkephalin. Using standard parameter sets, we obtained a temperature of ~800 K at injection and 728 ± 2 K into the IMS cell for p-methoxybenzylpyridinium. We found that T eff,vib inside the cell was dependent on the separation parameters and on the nature of the analyte. While the mean energy of the Boltzmann distributions increases with ion size, the corresponding temperature decreases because of increasing numbers of vibrational normal modes. We also investigated conformational rearrangements of 7+ ions of cytochrome c and reveal isomerization of the most compact structure, therefore highlighting the effects of weak heating on the gas-phase structure of biologically relevant ions. [less ▲]

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See detailBioactive Intraocular Lens – A Strategy to Control Secondary Cataract
Huang, Yi-Shiang ULg; Bertrand, Virginie ULg; Bozukova, Dimitriya et al

in IFMBE Proceedings (2014), 41

Cataract is the opacity of the lens, causing impairment of vision or even blindness. Today, a surgery is still the only available treatment. The intraocular lens (IOL) is a polymer implant designed to ... [more ▼]

Cataract is the opacity of the lens, causing impairment of vision or even blindness. Today, a surgery is still the only available treatment. The intraocular lens (IOL) is a polymer implant designed to replace the natural lens in the cataract surgery. However, the bioinert materials could not satisfy the unmet need in the secondary cataract control. Posterior capsular opacification (PCO, or Secondary Cataract), characterized by a thick and cloudy layer of lens epithelial cells (LECs), is the most common postoperative complication. In our research, a bioactive molecule is immobilized onto the conventional acrylic hydrophilic polymer pHEMA (Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) using oxygen plasma treatment followed by deposition. The RGD peptide sequence, being well-known for its ability to promote cellular attachment by binding to integrin receptors, is designed to stimulate the adhesion of LECs on the IOL. Our data show the peptide immobilized biomaterial not only exhibits similar optical property, but also reveals enhanced biological properties in cell adhesion and cell morphology maintenance. By means of surface functionalization of IOL to stimulate LECs adhesion, the secondary cataract could be controlled. [less ▲]

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See detailAdvances in proteomics for the FP7 Venomics project - Disulfide bridge assignement task
Massonnet, Philippe ULg; Upert, Gregory; Pastor, Alexandra et al

Scientific conference (2013, December 18)

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See detailTandem MS of -new- antibiotics from Bacillus guided by MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging
Debois, Delphine ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel; Cawoy, Hélène ULg et al

Conference (2013, December 05)

Generally, an antibiotic is thought to have a role in antagonism simply because the producing strain is known to exhibit a potential for pathogen growth inhibition. Some genetic approaches such as PCR ... [more ▼]

Generally, an antibiotic is thought to have a role in antagonism simply because the producing strain is known to exhibit a potential for pathogen growth inhibition. Some genetic approaches such as PCR using specific primers or genome mining using known sequence data of close relatives are also used. Nevertheless, none of these methods allows stating for a link between a specific compound and the observed antagonism. Yet MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool to decipher the chemical messengers exchanged by two protagonists [1,2,3;]. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) may be also used, either on extracts [2,3] or directly on the microbial colonies [4]. The presentation will thus be focused on two examples of application of MALDI MSI combined to in situ tandem mass spectrometry. The first presented case will be the antagonism between soilborne strain Paenibacillus polymyxa Pp56 and the fungal phytopathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Using MALDI MSI, we were able to precisely localize each detected antibiotic, allowing discriminating which LI-F lipopeptides (fusaricidin) were really active against the pathogen progression. Besides, the use of in situ MS/MS allowed us to sequence the peptide moiety of several LI-F lipopeptides, showing that some of them are actually a mixture of several forms. The second example concerns the metabolites that are released by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens S499 cells following their inoculation on 7 days old tomato roots. We developed specific bioassays for time-course monitoring by MALDI MSI. First analyses revealed an efficient secretion of surfactin by Bacillus cells after 3 days when colonization as biofilm-structured populations is well established. Even if the composition of antibiotic mixture does not greatly evolve over time, after long incubation periods (32 or 35 days post inoculation), new series of compounds are detected in the tomato root -surrounding medium. Structural analysis based on exact mass measurements and MS/MS experiments, performed directly on the semi-solid agar medium, allowed us to identify these compounds as new variants of surfactins. [1] Barger, S., et al., Anton Leeuw Int J G, 2012, 102, 435-445. [2] Hoefler, B. C., et al,. Natl Acad Sci USA, 2012, 109, 13082-13087. [3] Moree, W. J., et al., Natl Acad Sci USA, 2012, 109, 13811-13816. [4] Debois, D., et al., J Am Soc Mass Spectrom. 2013, 24, 1202-1213 [less ▲]

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See detailAttribution of Cysteine Connectivities in small toxins - New Prospects Based on Partial Oxidation/Reduction Experiments and Ion-Mobility Mass Spectrometry
Quinton, Loïc ULg; Massonnet, Philippe ULg; Echterbille, Julien ULg et al

Conference (2013, December)

Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications often found in biological compounds and especially in animal toxins. Disulfide bonds participate in the formation of specific folding of peptides and ... [more ▼]

Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications often found in biological compounds and especially in animal toxins. Disulfide bonds participate in the formation of specific folding of peptides and proteins, directly related to their biological activity. Cystein pairing determinations are primordial for the synthesis of chemical homologous displaying the same bioactivity than the natural compound. This task appears already difficult when the cysteine pairings have to be determined from large proteins. The combination of physical and chemical techniques such as NMR, enzymatic proteolysis, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, is needed to circumvent this difficulty. However, when the work concerns small compounds such as conotoxins, the problem is much more complex due to the low amount of available compound and to the lack of enzymatic cleavage sites between cysteines. In this study, we investigate the case of small peptides that contain two disulphide bonds. The idea is to determine the cystein pairings in such compounds by a chemical partial reduction (or oxidation) of the peptides, followed by the separation of the generated species by ion-mobility mass spectrometry, and their characterisation by tandem mass spectrometry. Up to now, we have investigated the partial reduction not only in solution (with DTT and TCEP) but also in the gas-phase (Electron transfer dissociation), and partial oxidation in solution (with 3-CPBA). The results demonstrate an unexpected complexity of the data, including low fragmentation ratios of peptides and disulfide scramblings. [less ▲]

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