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See detailDisulfide bonds assignment and folding characterization of peptide toxins by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry
Echterbille, Julien ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

Conference (2011, April 29)

Main component of animal venoms is peptide toxins, which are highly structured by several disulfide bridges. Disulfide bridges fill different roles as increasing the toxins efficiency by lowering their ... [more ▼]

Main component of animal venoms is peptide toxins, which are highly structured by several disulfide bridges. Disulfide bridges fill different roles as increasing the toxins efficiency by lowering their immunogenicity or providing the adequate conformation to efficiently bind to the biological receptor. The sequencing and the determination of the cysteine pairing is still challenging and therefore an important step in structural analysis. In this work, we present a new strategy to sequence structured toxins and assign S-S bridges using ion mobility resolved MS/MS. The method relies on the analysis of partially reduced multiple-disulfide peptide. The mixture of the different forms is resolved by ion mobility, followed by MS/MS acquisition on each mobility separated species. The proof of concept has been successfully conducted on α-CnI, a toxin purified from the venom of Conus consors marine snail. The toxin’s sequence contains four cysteines linked together with two disulfide bridges. α-CnI was partially reduced by a small excess of tris(carboxyethyl)phosphine (10:1). The resulting mixture was purified before analysis by infusion nanoESI-Synapt-G2. Fragmentation was performed after the mobility cell, to obtain specific fragments of each species. Partial reduction of α-CnI results in a mixture of oxidized (the two disulfides are formed), reduced (the two disulfides have been reduced) and partially reduced forms (one of the two disulfides has been reduced). The arrival time distribution of triply charged ions reveals the presence of 4 different species, characterized by different relative cross sections in the gas-phase. Mass matching allows identifying the species: the first mobility (the most compact structure) was identified to be the oxidized folded toxin (M). The latest peak, corresponding to the larger cross-section, was identified as the fully reduced toxin (M+4Da). The second and the third mobility peaks were attributed to the two partially reduced forms in which only one disulfide bridge was reduced (M+2Da). The change in ion mobility depends on which S-S bridge is reduced. Ion mobility separated species give characteristic fragment ions upon fragmentation in the transfer cell (i.e. after ion mobility separator). Interestingly, fragment ions coming from partially reduced species, especially the C-S or S-S bond cleavages, clearly indicates that the disulfide linkage of α-CnI is (Cys1-Cys3) and (Cys2-Cys4) as expected from literature. The method is now being applied with success to more complex systems containing 3 or 4 disulfide bridges. The influence of the charge state on the mobility separation is systematically analyzed in terms of structural implications. [less ▲]

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See detailMass spectrometry applied to biomolecules analysis
Far, Johann ULg; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel ULg; Meuwis, Marie-Alice ULg et al

Conference (2011, March 31)

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See detailBIOMARKER FOR OSTEOARTHRITIS AND/OR OTHER AGEING-RELATED DISEASES, AND USE THEREOF
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Gharbi, Myriam; Deberg, Michelle et al

Patent (2011)

The invention relates to the identification of abiomarker whose abundance in biological sampleis changed in subjects with osteoarthritis and/or other ageing-related diseases. Thebiomarker hasapplications ... [more ▼]

The invention relates to the identification of abiomarker whose abundance in biological sampleis changed in subjects with osteoarthritis and/or other ageing-related diseases. Thebiomarker hasapplications in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis and/or other ageing-related diseases, in determining the prognosis for an individual diagnosed with osteoarthritis and/or other ageing-related diseases, and in monitoring the efficacy of treatment for osteoarthritis and/or other ageing-related diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailBIOMARKER FOR OSTEOARTHRITIS AND/OR OTHER AGEING-RELATED DISEASES, AND USE THEREOF
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Gharbi, Myriam; Deberg, Michelle et al

Patent (2011)

The invention relates to the identification of abiomarker whose abundance in biological sampleis changed in subjects with osteoarthritis and/or other ageing-related diseases. Thebiomarker hasapplications ... [more ▼]

The invention relates to the identification of abiomarker whose abundance in biological sampleis changed in subjects with osteoarthritis and/or other ageing-related diseases. Thebiomarker hasapplications in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis and/or other ageing-related diseases, in determining the prognosis for an individual diagnosed with osteoarthritis and/or other ageing-related diseases, and in monitoring the efficacy of treatment for osteoarthritis and/or other ageing-related diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and serum organochlorine concentrations among neighbors of a municipal solid waste incinerator
Viel, Jean-François; Floret, Nathalie; Deconinck, Eric et al

in Environment International (2011), 37(2), 449-453

Organochlorine chemicals may contribute to an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) within nonoccupationally exposed populations. Among these chemicals, dioxins and furans were mainly released by ... [more ▼]

Organochlorine chemicals may contribute to an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) within nonoccupationally exposed populations. Among these chemicals, dioxins and furans were mainly released by municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) until a recent past in France, a source of exposure that is of public concern. We investigated organochlorines and the risk of NHL among neighbors of a French MSWI with high levels of dioxin emissions (Besançon, France), using serum concentrations to assess exposure. The study area consisted of three electoral wards, containing or surrounding the MSWI. Pesticides, dioxins, furans, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in the serum of 34 newly diagnosed NHL cases (2003– 2005) and 34 controls. Risks of NHL associated with each lipid-corrected serum concentration were estimated using exact logistic regression. The pesticides β-hexachlorocyclohexane (odds ratio [OR]=1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.00–1.12, per 10 ng/g lipid) and p,p' dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) (OR=1.20, 95% CI=1.01-1.45, per 10 ng/g lipid) were associated with NHL risk. Evidence indicated an increased NHL risk associated with cumulative WHO1998-toxic equivalency factor (TEQ) concentrations (dioxins, OR=1.12, 95% CI=1.03–1.26; furans, OR=1.16, 95% CI=1.03–1.35; dioxin-like PCBs, OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.00–1.07; and total TEQ, OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01–1.05), as well as with non dioxin-like PCBs (OR=1.02, 95% CI=1.01–1.05, per 10 ng/g lipid). Most congener-specific associations were statistically significant. This study provides strong and consistent support for an association between serum cumulative WHO1998-TEQ concentrations, at levels experienced by people residing in the vicinity of a polluting MSWI, and risk of NHL. [less ▲]

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See detailInnovative Proteomics for the Discovery of Systemically Accessible Cancer Biomarkers Suitable for Imaging and Targeted Therapies
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

in American Journal of Pathology (2011), 178(1), 12-18

The discovery of biomarkers that are readily accessible through the circulating blood and are selectively overexpressed in pathological tissues has become a major research objective, particularly in the ... [more ▼]

The discovery of biomarkers that are readily accessible through the circulating blood and are selectively overexpressed in pathological tissues has become a major research objective, particularly in the field of oncology. Indisputably, this group of molecules has a high potential to serve as an innovative tool for effective imaging and targeted cancer therapy approaches. In this attractive therapeutic concept, specific cancer proteins are reached by intravenously administered ligands that are coupled to cytotoxic drugs. Such compounds are able to induce cancer destruction while sparing normal tissues. Owing to the performance of mass spectrometry technology, current high-throughput proteomic analysis allows for the identification of a high number of proteins that are differentially expressed in the cancerous tissues. However, such approaches provide no information regarding the effective accessibility of the biomarkers and, therefore, the possibility for these discovered proteins to be targeted. To bypass this major limitation, which clearly slows the discovery of such biomarkers, innovative methodological strategies have been developed to enrich the clinical specimens before the mass spectrometry analysis. The focus is laid on the group of proteins that are necessarily located either at the exterior face of the plasma membrane or in the extracellular matrix. The present review addresses the current technologies meant for the discovery and analysis of accessible antigens from clinically relevant samples. [less ▲]

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See detailFuran Formation from Lipids in Starch-Based Model Systems, As Influenced by Interactions with Antioxidants and Proteins.
Owczarek-Fendor, A.; De Meulenaer, B.; Scholl, Georges ULg et al

in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2011), 59(6), 2368-2376

The formation of furan upon sterilization of a lipid-containing starch gel was investigated in the presence of various antioxidants, namely, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, and ascorbic acid, with and ... [more ▼]

The formation of furan upon sterilization of a lipid-containing starch gel was investigated in the presence of various antioxidants, namely, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, and ascorbic acid, with and without proteins. Results indicated that alpha-tocopherol did not significantly influence furan formation from oxidized lipids. beta-Carotene, suggested previously to be a furan precursor itself, did influence the generation of furan in a concentration-dependent manner, although to a limited extent. Surprisingly, the presence of lipids seemed to limit the furan generation from beta-carotene. Interestingly, the addition of ascorbic acid to the emulsions containing soybean or sunflower oils considerably enhanced the formation of furan from these oils. This was also the case when fresh oils were applied, shown previously to be nearly unable to generate furan. This observation can be explained by an intensified ascorbic acid degradation stimulated by the presence of lipids. [less ▲]

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See detailNew Methodology to detect toxin-GPCR binding by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry
Echterbille, Julien ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg; Gilles, Nicolas et al

Poster (2011)

Introduction More than 50 thousands of venomous species are currently indexed in the world. Each of their venoms is composed of 200 to 1000 different toxins which potentially exhibit a high selectivity ... [more ▼]

Introduction More than 50 thousands of venomous species are currently indexed in the world. Each of their venoms is composed of 200 to 1000 different toxins which potentially exhibit a high selectivity for membrane receptors such as ionic channels or G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs constitute the larger family of receptors since around 800 different kinds of them are knows. GPCRs are the target of around 30% of the current pharmacopeia drugs. Notable examples include Novartis’s Zelnorm, Eli Lilly’s Zyprexa and Schering-Plough’s Clarinex used to treat constipation, schizophrenia and allergies, respectively. Finding new GPCRs ligands appears of prime interest to design new pharmacological tools and potentially discover the drugs of our future. Interestingly, several toxins from venoms have already been described to bind to this particular family of receptor, opening the way to the discovery of new peptide drugs from animal venoms1-2. This work presents a pioneering MALDI-TOF/TOF based strategy to fish new GPCRs ligands from complex mixtures such as venom fractions. Methods The proof of concept of this methodology was built by studying the binding of [Arg8]-vasopressin (AVP) on type 2-vasopressin receptor (V2). Experimentally, fragments of cellular membranes over-expressing V2 receptors were incubated with cone snail’s venom fraction (~30 peptide toxins) doped by a small amount of AVP. After 2 hours incubation, free and bound fractions were carefully purified with a combination of centrifugation and micro column purifications. Samples were finally analyzed with a Bruker Ultraflex II MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometer and the resulting spectra were interpreted with FlexAnalysis (v3.0), BioTools (v3.2) and SequenceEditor (v3.2) bioinformatics’ softwares from Bruker Daltonics. Preliminary data After the incubation of cellular membranes overexpressing V2 GPCR with a complex mixture of peptides doped by AVP, we clearly detect that the only V2 ligand present in the fraction was the AVP. Our result demonstrates the possibility to identify a ligand of GPCRs from a complex peptide mixture, such as venom fractions. Contrary to radiobinding, this approach allows detecting the direct binding of the toxin and does not imply to know a ligand of the studied GPCR before starting the experiments. This opens the way to the deorphanization of receptors (180 orphans GPCRs over 800). Moreover, since the new ligand is detected by mass spectrometry, it is directly identified from the mixture, without additional purification. Its structural characterization can be directly performed by de novo sequencing experiments. The drawback of our approach is the very long (but crucial!) sample preparation as each sample requires 2 purification steps (for both free and bound fraction). The next step of our work will be the automation of the procedure to allow a high-throughput screening of venom fractions on different GPCRs and the discovery of new ligands. Novel aspect GPCR’s ligands discovery by MALDI-TOF/TOF based techniques: a new pharmacological tool. 1 Quinton, L. et al. Isolation and pharmacological characterization of AdTx1, a natural peptide displaying specific insurmountable antagonism of the a1A-adrenoceptor. British Journal of Pharmacology 159, 316-325 (2010). 2 Rouget, C. et al. Identification of a novel snake peptide toxin displaying high affinity and antagonist behaviour for the α2-adrenoceptors. British Journal of Pharmacology 161, 1361-1374, doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00966.x (2010). [less ▲]

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See detailDisulfide bond assignment and folding characterization of peptide toxins by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry
Echterbille, Julien ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg; Rosu, Frédéric ULg et al

Poster (2011)

Introduction Animal venoms are mainly composed of peptide toxins, which are highly structured by several disulfide bridges. Disulfide bridges are a key feature as (i) they increase the toxins efficiency ... [more ▼]

Introduction Animal venoms are mainly composed of peptide toxins, which are highly structured by several disulfide bridges. Disulfide bridges are a key feature as (i) they increase the toxins efficiency by lowering their immunogenicity; (ii) they provide the adequate conformation for high affinity binding to the biological receptor. The sequencing and the determination of the cysteine pairing is still challenging and therefore an important step in their structure analysis and the understanding of their interactions with receptors. In this work, we present a new strategy to sequence structured toxins and assign S-S bridges using ion mobility resolved MS/MS. Methods The method relies on the analysis of partially reduced multiple-disulfide peptide. The mixture of the different forms is resolved by ion mobility, followed by MS/MS acquisition on each mobility separated species. The proof of concept has been successfully conducted on α-CnI, a toxin purified from the venom of Conus consors marine snail. The toxin sequence is GRCCHPACGKYYSC-NH2. It contains four cysteines linked together with two disulfide bridges. α-CnI was partially reduced by a small excess of tris(carboxyethyl)phosphine (10:1) at 56°C during 30min. The resulting mixture was purified by ZipTip C18 micro columns before analysis by infusion nanoESI-Synapt-G2. Fragmentation was performed after the mobility cell, to obtain specific fragments of each species. Mobilograms and mass spectra were analyzed using MassLynx (v4.1) and Driftscope (v2.1) from Waters. Preliminary data Partial reduction of a-CnI was performed in order to obtain a mixture of oxidized (the two disulfides are formed), reduced (the two disulfides have been reduced) and partially reduced forms (only one of the two disulfides has been reduced). The arrival time distribution of triply charged ions reveals the presence of 4 different species, characterized by a different relative cross sections in the gas-phase. The charge state of the ions influences the ion mobility separation. Mass matching allows identifying the species: the first mobility (the most compact structure) was identified to be the oxidized folded toxin (M=1541.58 Da). The latest peak, corresponding to the larger cross-section, was identified as the fully reduced toxin (M=1545.6 Da). The second and the third mobility peaks were attributed to the two partially reduced forms in which only one disulfide bridge was reduced (M=1543.59 Da). The change in ion mobility depends on which S-S bridge is reduced. Ion mobility separated species give characteristic fragment ions upon fragmentation in the transfer cell (i.e. after ion mobility separator). Interestingly, fragment ions coming from partially reduced species, especially the C-S or S-S bond cleavages, clearly indicates that the disulfide linkage of α-CnI is (Cys1-Cys3) and (Cys2-Cys4) as expected from literature. The method is now being applied with success to more complex systems containing 3 or 4 disulfide bridges. The influence of the charge state on the mobility separation is systematically analyzed in terms of structural implications. Novel aspect Sequencing and disulfide bridges assignment of peptide toxins using ion mobility resolved MS/MS [less ▲]

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See detailLevels and trends of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in camel milk (Camelus bactrianus and Camelus dromedarius) from Kazakhstan
Konuspayeva, Gaukhar; Faye, Bernard; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

in Chemosphere (2011), 85

To date, despite the fact it represents a very important part of the national dairy production, no data are available concerning the concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs ... [more ▼]

To date, despite the fact it represents a very important part of the national dairy production, no data are available concerning the concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in camel milk from the Republic of Kazakhstan. Selected PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs were measured in pools of milk from camels (n = 15) located in various places of Kazakhstan (Almaty, Atyrau, Aralsk, Shymkent) and sampled at two different seasons for two different species (Camelus bactrianus and Camelus dromedarius). Non-dioxin-like (NDL- )PCB concentrations (6.3 ± 2.7 ng gÿ1 fat, median 5.1 ng gÿ1 fat, range 0.6–17.4 ng gÿ1 fat) were far below the maximum value of 40 ng gÿ1 fat proposed by the EU. Dioxin-like (DL-)PCB concentrations (1.7 ± 0.7 ng gÿ1 fat, median 1.5 ng gÿ1 fat, range 0.3–4.2 ng gÿ1 fat) and the NDL-PCB to DL-PCB ratio (4.3) were similar to what is reported in EU for cow-based dairy products. PCB 52 and PCB 101 appeared to be proportionally more present in Kazakh camel milk samples (>60% of the sum of the 6 indicator NDL-PCBs) than in European cow milk samples (<10% of the sum of the 6 indicator NDL-PCBs), indicating possible differences in the route of exposure to PCBs in Kazakhstan. PCB 105 and PCB 118 appeared to be present at higher concentrations in camel milk (>80% of the sum of the 12 DL-PCBs). PCB 105, PCB 118 and PCB 156 were the major congeners for DL-PCBs, accounting for 92% of the sum of concentrations of DL-PCBs (88% for Belgian cows). In terms of TEQ, PCB 126 and PCB 118 are the major contributors and represent, respectively, 80% and 14% of the DL-PCB TEQWHO05 concentrations. No significant interracial or geographical trends were observed for NDL- and DL-PCB profiles. However, concentrations of all DL-PCBs appeared to be significantly higher for samples collected in Atyrau region. 2,3,7,8-TCDD level (mean 0.08 ± 0.07 pg gÿ1 fat, median 0.08 pg gÿ1 fat, range 0.00–0.18 pg gÿ1 fat, 60% > LOQs) were very low for all samples and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF was the major contributor (27%) to the PCDD/F TEQWHO05. Considering the total TEQWHO05 (sum of DL-PCBs and PCDD/Fs), DL-PCB and PCDD/F contributed for 73% and 27%, respectively. A decrease of only 1% of the total TEQ was observed when using the TEFWHO05 scale instead of the TEFWHO98 scale. Two samples collected in the region of Atyrau exceeded the EU maximum level value of 6.00 pg TEQWHO98 gÿ1 fat (6.4 pg TEQWHO05 gÿ1 fat and 6.9 pg TEQWHO05 gÿ1 fat). Both samples exceeded the EU action level for the sum of DL-PCBs. Based on the fact that camel milk is used to prepare popular traditional fermented drinks like shubat, this suggests that the human exposure in the Caspian Sea region of Atyrau should be expected to be higher than in the other regions studied here. [less ▲]

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See detailFibulin-3 fragments (FIB3-1 and FIB3-2) are potential new biomarkers for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis
Gharbi, M; Dubuc, JE; Deberg, M et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2011), 70(Suppl 3), 354

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See detailIdentification of stromal proteins overexpressed in nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma.
Kischel, Philippe; Waltregny, David ULg; Greffe, Yannick et al

in Proteome Science (2011), 9(1), 63

ABSTRACT: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) represents a category of lymphoid neoplasms with unique features, notably the usual scarcity of tumour cells in involved tissues. The most common subtype of classical HL ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) represents a category of lymphoid neoplasms with unique features, notably the usual scarcity of tumour cells in involved tissues. The most common subtype of classical HL, nodular sclerosis HL, characteristically comprises abundant fibrous tissue stroma. Little information is available about the protein composition of the stromal environment from HL. Moreover, the identification of valid protein targets, specifically and abundantly expressed in HL, would be of utmost importance for targeted therapies and imaging, yet the biomarkers must necessarily be accessible from the bloodstream. To characterize HL stroma and to identify potentially accessible proteins, we used a chemical proteomic approach, consisting in the labelling of accessible proteins and their subsequent purification and identification by mass spectrometry. We performed an analysis of potentially accessible proteins in lymph node biopsies from HL and reactive lymphoid tissues, and in total, more than 1400 proteins were identified in 7 samples. We have identified several extracellular matrix proteins overexpressed in HL, such as versican, fibulin-1, periostin, and other proteins such as S100-A8. These proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry on a larger series of biopsy samples, and bear the potential to become targets for antibody-based anti-cancer therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailA specific inorganic triphosphatase from Nitrosomonas europaea: structure and catalytic mechanism
Delvaux, David ULg; Murty, Mamidana R.V.S; Gabelica, Valérie ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2011), 286

The CYTH superfamily of proteins is named after its two founding members, the CyaB adenylyl cyclase from Aeromonas hydrophila and the human 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase. Because these proteins often ... [more ▼]

The CYTH superfamily of proteins is named after its two founding members, the CyaB adenylyl cyclase from Aeromonas hydrophila and the human 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase. Because these proteins often form a closed β-barrel, they are also referred to as “Triphosphate Tunnel Metalloenzymes” (TTM). Functionally, they are characterized by their ability to bind triphosphorylated substrates and divalent metal ions. These proteins exist in most organisms and catalyze different reactions, depending on their origin. Here we investigate structural and catalytic properties of the recombinant TTM protein from Nitrosomonas europaea (NeuTTM), a 19-kDa protein. Crystallographic data show that it crystallizes as a dimer and that, in contrast to other TTM proteins, it has an open β-barrel structure. We demonstrate that NeuTTM is a highly specific inorganic triphosphatase, hydrolyzing tripolyphosphate (PPPi) with high catalytic efficiency in the presence of Mg2+. These data are supported by native mass spectrometry analysis showing that the enzyme binds PPPi (and Mg-PPPi) with high affinity (Kd < 1.5 μM), while it has a low affinity for ATP or thiamine triphosphate. In contrast to Aeromonas and Yersinia CyaB proteins, NeuTTM has no adenylyl cyclase activity, but it shares several properties with other enzymes of the CYTH superfamily, e.g. heat-stability, alkaline pH optimum and inhibition by Ca2+ and Zn2+ ions. We suggest a catalytic mechanism involving a catalytic dyad formed by K52 and Y28. The present data provide the first characterization of a new type of phosphohydrolase (unrelated to pyrophosphatases or exopolyphosphatases), able to hydrolyze inorganic triphosphate with high specificity. [less ▲]

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See detailTridentate N-Donor Palladium(II) Complexes as Efficient Coordinating Quadruplex DNA Binders
Largy, Eric; Hamon, Florian; Rosu, Frédéric ULg et al

in Chemistry : A European Journal (2011), 17(47), 13274-13283

Fifteen complexes of palladium, platinum, and copper, featuring five different N-donor tridentate (terpyridine-like) ligands, were prepared with the aim of testing their G-quadruplexDNA binding properties ... [more ▼]

Fifteen complexes of palladium, platinum, and copper, featuring five different N-donor tridentate (terpyridine-like) ligands, were prepared with the aim of testing their G-quadruplexDNA binding properties. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer melting assay indicated a striking positive effect of palladium on G-quadruplex DNA stabilization compared with platinum and copper, as well as an influence of the structure of the organic ligand. Putative binding modes (noncoordinative p stacking and base coordination) of palladium and platinum complexes were investigated by ESI-MS and UV/Vis spectroscopy experiments, which all revealed a greater ability of palladium complexes to coordinate DNA bases. In contrast, platinum compounds tend to predominantly bind to quadruplex DNA in their aqua form by noncoordinative interactions. Remarkably, complexes of [Pd(ttpy)] and [Pd(tMebip)] (ttpy=tolylterpyridine, tMebip=2,2'-(4-p-tolylpyridine-2,6-diyl)bis(1-methyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole)) coordinate efficiently G-quadruplex structures at room temperature in less than 1 h, and are more efficient than their platinum counterparts for inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Altogether, these results demonstrate that both the affinity for G-quadruplex DNA and the binding mode of metal complexes can be modulated by modifying either the metal or the organic ligand. [less ▲]

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See detailFuran formation in baby food model system via lipid oxidation and sugar degradation
Owczarek-Fendor, Agnieszka; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Scholl, Georges ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2011), 76(1), 107-110

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