References of "De Pauw, Edwin"
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See detailDistribution and identification of molecular interactions between tomato roots and bacterial biofilms
Debois, Delphine ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel ULg; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg et al

Conference (2012, September)

Some non pathogenic microorganisms evolving in the root micro-environment can trigger a positive effect on plant, increasing host defense against disease or/and directly inhibiting growth of pathogen in ... [more ▼]

Some non pathogenic microorganisms evolving in the root micro-environment can trigger a positive effect on plant, increasing host defense against disease or/and directly inhibiting growth of pathogen in soil (1). To initiate both phenomena leading to biocontrol activity, microorganisms use plant exudates to grow on roots and to produce in-situ active compounds. In Bacilli, cyclic lipopeptides of the surfactin, iturin and fengycin families represent important antibiotics involved in biocontrol (2). Recent studies in microbiology allowed a better understanding of plant microorganism interactions but few has been done at the molecular level. In this study, MALDI MS imaging has been used to study the nature of the secreted lipopeptide molecules, their relative quantity and their distribution in the root’s environment. Disinfected tomato seeds were first germinated at 28°C in sterile conditions for germination. Seedlings were then placed in Petri dish on ITO glass slide recovered with a thin layer of plant nutritive solution (Hoagland) containing 1,75% of agar and treated with freshly-grown cells of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens S499. Petri dishes were finally incubated vertically in phytotron at 28°C with a 16h photoperiod. Different root age / time of incubation were studied: 13 / 3; 13 / 7; 21 / 14 and 39 / 32. Control tomato root (without bacterial treatment) of the same ages were also analyzed (13 / 0; 21 / 0 and 42 / 0. For MALDI imaging experiments, the ITO slide was removed from the agar and dried in a dessiccator under vacuum. The matrix solution (α-cyano-hydroxycinnamic acid, 5mg/mL in ACN/0.2% TFA 70/30) was applied with an ImagePrep automated sprayer (Bruker Daltonics). An UltraFlex II TOF/TOF and a Solarix FT-ICR mass spectrometers were used to record molecular cartographies. The average mass spectra recorded around the tomato root (2-3 mm on both sides of the root) showed that lipopeptides were major compounds detected on the agar. The relative intensity of lipopeptides families varied with respect to the age of the root/biofilm system. In the 13/3 system, 3 homologues of surfactins were essentially detected (C13, C14 and C15), with very few iturins and fengycins. Their localizations were identical, whatever the considered homologue. Then the production of iturin and fengycin families increases in older systems (13/7 and 21/14) and a novel homologue of surfactin is detected (C12). Some variations in localizations within families may be observed (around the root or at the close vicinity of it in function of the considered homologue or alkali adduct). Then for the oldest system we studied, iturins and fengycins are not detected anymore and the localization of surfactins is less precise. In the 39/32 system, we also detected unknown compounds at 986.6, 1000.6, 1014.7 and 1028.7 m/z. The mass range of these compounds allied to the mass difference between two consecutive ion peaks let us think that these unknown compounds could be a new lipopeptide family. Investigations are in progress to identify these new secondary metabolites of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. [less ▲]

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See detailBioactive Intraocular Lens - A New Concept to Control Secondary Cataract
Huang, Yi-Shiang ULg; Alexandre, Michaël ULg; Bozukova, Dimitriya et al

Poster (2012, August 29)

A cataract is pathology opacity of the lens, causing impairment of vision or even blindness. Today, a surgery is still the only available treatment. The intraocular lens (IOL) is a polymer implant ... [more ▼]

A cataract is pathology opacity of the lens, causing impairment of vision or even blindness. Today, a surgery is still the only available treatment. The intraocular lens (IOL) is a polymer implant designed to replace the natural lens in the cataract surgery. The materials for IOL require excellent optical properties for light transmission, mechanical properties for folding injection during surgery, and biological properties for preventing body rejection. The biocompatibility - or more specified, bio-inert - seems to be the prerequisite in selecting the materials. [1] However, the bioinert materials could not satisfy the unmet need in the secondary cataract control. Posterior capsular opacification (PCO, or Secondary Cataract), characterized by a thick and cloudy layer of lens epithelial cells (LECs), is the most common postoperative complication. In 1997, a “Sandwich Theory” model was proposed to elucidate the developmental process of PCO. [2] In this model, the residual LECs between the lens capsular bag and the IOL undergo proliferation, migration, as well as transdifferentiation and finally induce PCO if the affinity to the IOL material is low. In our research, a bioactive molecule is introduced to the conventional acrylic hydrophilic polymer pHEMA(Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) by covalent conjugation. The RGD peptide sequence, being well-known for its tissue integration ability, is designed to stimulate the biointegration between the LECs and the IOL. [3]. Our data have shown the peptide grafted biomaterial not only exhibits similar optical and mechanical properties, but also reveals enhanced biological properties in cell adhesion and cell morphology maintenance. By means of surface functionalization of IOL to stabilize and restore LECs, the secondary cataract could be controlled in a regenerative medicine way. References [1] Dimitriya Bozukova (2010) Materials Science and Engineering R, 69: 63-83. [2] Reijo Linnola (1997) J Cataract Refract Surg., 10: 1539–42. [3] Ruoslahti E (1986) Cell, 44(4): 517-8. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification and Relative-quantification of Glycans by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization In-Source Decay with Hydrogen Abstraction
Akasawa, Daiki; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg

in Analytical Chemistry (2012)

The use of specific matrices allows enhancing the scope of in-source decay (ISD) applications in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) thanks to the specificity of analyte-matrix chemistry ... [more ▼]

The use of specific matrices allows enhancing the scope of in-source decay (ISD) applications in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) thanks to the specificity of analyte-matrix chemistry. The use of an oxidizing matrix, 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA) for MALDI-ISD of glycans is shown to promote fragmentation pathways involving radical precursors. Both glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages are promoted by hydrogen abstraction from hydroxyl group of glycans by 5-NSA molecules. Cross-ring cleavage ions are potentially useful in linkage analysis, one of the most critical steps of glycan characterization. Moreover, we show here that isobaric glycans could be distinguished by structure specific ISD ions, and that the molar ratio of glycan isomers in the mixture can be estimated from their fragment ions abundance. The use of 5-NSA also opens the possibility to perform pseudo-MS3 analysis of glycans. Therefore, MALDI-ISD with 5-NSA is a useful method for identification of glycans and semi-quantitative analysis of mixture of glycan isomers. [less ▲]

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See detailFuran formation in starch-based model systems containing carbohydrates in combination with proteins, ascorbic acid and lipids
Owczarek-Fendor, Agnieszka; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Scholl, Georges ULg et al

in Food Chemistry (2012), 133(3), 816-821

Formation of the ‘‘possibly carcinogenic’’ furan during thermal treatment of a starch-based model food system containing selected sugars alone and in the presence of proteins, ascorbic acid and lipids ... [more ▼]

Formation of the ‘‘possibly carcinogenic’’ furan during thermal treatment of a starch-based model food system containing selected sugars alone and in the presence of proteins, ascorbic acid and lipids, respectively, was investigated. The results showed that in starch gels containing various sugars significantly more furan was formed at pH 6 than at pH 4. Moreover, addition of whey proteins enhanced the generation of furan considerably at both pH values tested. In acidic conditions, no significant difference was observed between the amounts of furan found in a starch–carbohydrate–ascorbic acid model system and those formed in a starch-based samples containing only ascorbic acid. Addition of fresh lipids did not affect furan formation. However, when oxidised soybean oil was applied, the generated amounts of furan were higher than expected from the sum of furan found in the separate starch–carbohydrate and starch–lipid samples. Interestingly, the most efficient carbohydrate in furan generation, among the sugars tested, at pH 6, was lactose, especially when heated in the presence of proteins. This is the first report on the generation of furan from lactose. [less ▲]

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See detailRisk assessment for furan contamination through the food chain in Belgian children
Scholl, Georges ULg; Huybrechts, Inge; Humblet, Marie-France ULg et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants (2012), 29(8), 1219-1229

Young, old, pregnant and immuno-compromised persons are of great concern for risk assessors as they represent the sub-populations most at risk. The present paper focuses on risk assessment linked to furan ... [more ▼]

Young, old, pregnant and immuno-compromised persons are of great concern for risk assessors as they represent the sub-populations most at risk. The present paper focuses on risk assessment linked to furan exposure in children. Only the Belgian population was considered because individual contamination and consumption data that are required for accurate risk assessment were available for Belgian children only. Two risk assessment approaches, so called deterministic and probabilistic, were applied and their results were compared for the estimation of the daily intake. A significant difference between the average Estimated Daily Intake (EDI) was underlined between the deterministic (419 ng * (kgb.w. * day)-1) and the probabilistic (583 ng * (kgb.w. * day)-1) approaches, which results from the mathematical treatment of the null consumption and contamination data. The risk was characterized by two ways: (1) the classical approach by comparison of the EDI to a reference dose (RfDchronic-oral) and (2) the most recent approach, namely the Margin of Exposure (MoE) approach. Both reached similar conclusions: the risk level is not of a major concern, but is neither negligible. In the first approach, only 2.7% or 6.6% (respectively in the deterministic and in the probabilistic way) of the studied population presented an EDI above the RfDchronic-oral. In the second approach, the percentage of children displaying a MoE above 10,000 and below 100 is 3% - 0% and 20% - 0.01% in the deterministic and probabilistic modes respectively. In addition, children were compared to adults and significant differences between the contamination patterns were highlighted. Whilst major contamination was linked to coffee consumption in adults (55%), no item predominantly contributed to the contamination in children. The most important were soups (19%), dairy products (17%), pasta and rice (11%), fruit and potatoes (9% each). [less ▲]

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See detailProteomics of aphid salivary proteins
Francis, Frédéric ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg; Vandermoten, Sophie ULg et al

Conference (2012, August)

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See detailTermites artificially-fed on unusual diet and resulting enzymatic switches
Bauwens, Julien ULg; Tarayre, Cédric ULg; Matteotti, Christel et al

Poster (2012, August)

Wood-feeding termites as Reticulitermes santonensis generally feed on cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. However, these opportunistic insects are also able to degrade other carbohydrates, such as ... [more ▼]

Wood-feeding termites as Reticulitermes santonensis generally feed on cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. However, these opportunistic insects are also able to degrade other carbohydrates, such as starch. The production of putative endogenous α - amylase has been previously shown in R. flavipes, as the disappearance of the major symbiotic flagellates from the hindgut. Here, we compared enzymatic activities (CMCase, MCCase, xylanase, amylase, α- and β-glucosidase) between different fractions of the digestive tract of starch-, cellulose-, and wood-fed termites. Main compounds of the artificial diets, namely starch or MCC, resulted in differential enzymatic activity. Even the substitution of wood by artificial diets itself seemed to induce changes in enzymatic activities, regardless of the main substrate in the diet, as we observed strong midgut α-glucosidase activity only for artificially-fed termites. Preliminary assays to isolate and characterize enzymes were performed using proteomic methods. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular imaging through in combinaison with quantitative proteomic approaches unraveling the molecular players of breast cancer adaptation to anti-angiogenic therapy.
Cimino, Jonathan ULg; Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg; Calligaris, David ULg et al

Poster (2012, June 22)

Breast carcinoma is the most common and second leading cause of cancer mortality in women. The recognition of the “angiogenic switch” as a rate-limiting secondary step in tumorigenesis led to extensive ... [more ▼]

Breast carcinoma is the most common and second leading cause of cancer mortality in women. The recognition of the “angiogenic switch” as a rate-limiting secondary step in tumorigenesis led to extensive pre-clinical researches on angiogenesis and finally the approval of VEGF-neutralizing antibodies (bevacizumab) and VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKs:Sunitinib). The Sunitinib has been used clinically in patients with breast cancer refractory to other therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, like the cytotoxic therapies, these drugs do not produce lasting effects and resistance to treatment appeared clinically. Questions have emerged about the failure of anti-angiogenic therapy in clinic and the limitations of predictive preclinical models, and also about the molecular assessment of all stages of tumor adaptation and metastatic disease. To this end, we applied quantitative proteomics and imaging mass spectrometry tools to visualize and study the profiles of proteins and small molecules associated with tumor treated or not with Sunitinib using a novel preclinical model of breast carcinoma cells. In this project, we first developed a reproducible model of resistance to Sunitinib of human triple negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells expressing luciferase gene. Cells were subcutaneously injected into mice RAG1-/- and divided into four experimental groups including, control mice treated with vehicle or Sunitinib for 30 days and sacrificed 1 days after treatment withdrawal or when tumor reached a volume of 300 mm3. In the second step. Tumors were analyzed using a nanoAcquity UPLC Synapt TM HDMS TM G1 (Waters, Manchester,UK) and Mass Spectrometry Imaging. For quantitative proteomic analyses of tumors, a bioinformatics analysis was used with the Protein lynx global server 2.2.5 software. Imaging mass spectrometry was performed on tissue sections of tumors and organs subsequently colonized by metastases. Matrix sublimation was used to coat tumor sections (14 µm-tick) with 1.5 Diaminonaphthalene for lipids analysis and Sinapinic acid for entire proteins analysis. Ion cartographies were recorded with a Solarix 9.4T FTMS instrument for lipids and with an Ultraflex II TOF-TOF instrument for entire proteins (Bruker Daltonics, Germany) with a spatial resolution of 100 µm. Global protemic revealed different protein profiles between tumor treated or not with Sunitinib. The Mass Spectrometry Imaging detected differences in intensity and location of some proteins and lipids are also associated with some histological features including inflammatory, necrotic and angiogenic areas. Bioinformatics analysis will be applied to ensure the integration of all data in order to provide the basis for identifying molecular pathways activated during the acquisition of refractoriness to drug treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailSelection and cultivation of hydrolytic microorganisms extracted from the digestive tract of the termite Reticulitermes santonensis (3DV.1.55)
Tarayre, Cédric ULg; Bauwens, Julien ULg; Matteotti, Christel ULg et al

Poster (2012, June 21)

Biofuel production can be based on the use of fermentable substrates issued from the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass stemming from agricultural residues and by-products. However, such substrates are ... [more ▼]

Biofuel production can be based on the use of fermentable substrates issued from the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass stemming from agricultural residues and by-products. However, such substrates are not easy to degrade. Enzymes (cellulases, xylanases, etc.) can be used for this purpose and pre-treatments can increase their action by providing more available extremities. The digestive tract of the termite Reticulitermes santonensis contains various microorganisms (bacteria, molds, protists) able to degrade the wood components. These microorganisms act as consortia, leading to a better hydrolysis than in the cow rumen. Our purpose is the isolation of microorganisms from termite guts in order to evaluate their potential for hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials. This approach led us to isolate and to study a bacteria (Bacillus sp.) displaying a xylanase activity, a mold (Aspergillus sp.) displaying a cellulase activity and a chrysophyte (protist) displaying an amylase activity. [less ▲]

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See detailNanobodies as structural probes to investigate the mechanism of fibril formation by the amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme
Dumont, Janice ULg; pardon, Els; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali et al

Poster (2012, June)

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutatants I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutants F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. These ... [more ▼]

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutatants I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutants F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. These proteins form extracellular amyloid fibrils that deposit in a wide range of tissues and organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys where they cause damages [1]. It was shown that the D67H and I56T mutations cause a loss in stability and more particularly a loss of global cooperativity of protein [1]. Consequently, under physiologically relevant conditions, these variants can transiently populate a partially unfolded state in which the beta-domain and the C-helix are cooperatively unfolded while the rest of the protein remains native like [1]. The formation of intermolecular interactions between the regions that are unfolded in this intermediate state is likely to be a fundamental trigger of the aggregation process that ultimately leads to the formation and deposition of fibrils in tissues. We have also shown that the binding of three variable domain of camelid antibodies (VHHs) - raised against the wild type human lysozyme inhibit in vitro the formation of amyloid fibrils by the lysozyme variants. These three VHHs bind on different regions of lysozyme and act as amyloid fibril inhibitor through different mechanisms [2, 3, and unpublished results]. In the present work, sixteen new VHHs specific of human lysozyme have been generated. Competition experiments have shown that they bind to five non-overlapping epitopes. We have demonstrated that five of these VHHs are able to bind lysozyme in conditions used for amyloid fibril formation, and interestingly two of them recognize two epitopes that are different from those of the three VHHs previously characterized [2, 3, and unpublished results]. The effects of these new VHHs on the properties of lysozyme variants such as stability, cooperativity and aggregation will be discussed. [1] Dumoulin, M., J.R. Kumita, and C.M. Dobson, Normal and aberrant biological self-assembly: Insights from studies of human lysozyme and its amyloidogenic variants. Acc Chem Res, 2006, 39(9), 603-610. [2] Dumoulin, M., et al., A camelid antibody fragment inhibits the formation of amyloid fibrils by human lysozyme. Nature, 2003, 424, 783-788. [3] Chan, P.H., et al., Engineering a camelid antibody fragment that binds to the active site of human lysozyme and inhibits its conversion into amyloid fibrils. Biochemistry, 2008, 47, 11041-11054. [less ▲]

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See detailA Promising Perspective for Pathologies Diagnosis by MALDI In-Source Decay Imaging with a FTMS System.
Calligaris, David ULg; Debois, Delphine ULg; Turtoi, Andrei ULg et al

Poster (2012, May 23)

Introduction MALDI imaging mass spectrometry has proven to be effective for the discovery and the monitoring of disease-related proteins. With this technique a molecular diagnosis could be done directly ... [more ▼]

Introduction MALDI imaging mass spectrometry has proven to be effective for the discovery and the monitoring of disease-related proteins. With this technique a molecular diagnosis could be done directly on tissue sections in the environment of the diseased area. The use of in-source decay (ISD), that does allow fast and reliable sequences assignments of proteins termini, is a crucial tool for the identification of known biomarkers during MALDI imaging experiments. Combined with ultra-high mass resolution and high mass measurement accuracy of Fourier transform ion-cyclotron (FTICR) mass spectrometry, it is possible to unambiguously assign sequences of proteins present in tissue slices. In this study, we have shown that FTICR mass spectrometry could be a powerful tool to diagnose pathologies by MALDI-ISD imaging. Methods All measurements were carried out on a SolariX FTMS (9.4 tesla) equipped with a Dual Source including smartbeamTMII laser which includes a robust solid state 1 kHz laser with advanced optics for molecular imaging (Bruker Daltonics). Lysozyme (14.3-kDa) or Human Serum Albumin (66.3-kDa) solution (1 mg/ml in 0.1 % TFA) was mixed with 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) and analyzed by MALDI-ISD and MALDI-ISD imaging. Mouse brain and rabbit eye tissue slices were washed (fixed) to obtain optimal sensitivity and high-quality ion. Before DAN application with an ImagePrep (Bruker Daltonics) and MALDI-ISD imaging analyzes, spots of myelin and crystalline were deposited near mouse brain or rabbit eye tissues, respectively. Results were interpreted using BioToolsTM 3.2 in combination with MascotTM (Matrix Science) for ISD spectra and FlexImagingTM 2.1 for MALDI-ISD imaging experiments. α Preliminary data The studies were carried out by MALDI-ISD and MALDI-ISD imaging analyses to evidence the interest on FTICR mass spectrometer for proteins identification in the field of biomarkers characterization. It is demonstrated that protein ISD leads to the same pattern of fragmentation observed during MALDI-TOF analyzes. Fragmentation generates cn- and zn-series ions of lysozyme and HSA in presence of DAN. Supplementary an-, bn-, xn- and yn-series ions can also be observed. The internal calibration of all the data provides a mass accuracy neighboring 2.5 ppm over the m/z range of interest (300-2500 Da) and a mass resolution of 70000 at m/z 400 Da. It allows the assignment of ISD fragments of proteins, in the low mass range (m/z between 300 and 900), whether from pure solutions or included in tissue slices. Moreover, spots of pure proteins solution (myelin or crystalline) near tissue slices allows to unambiguously validate the proteins identification during MALDI ISD imaging experiments. Novel aspect This study evidences the main input of FTICR mass spectrometer for pathologies diagnosis based on biomarkers localization and identification by MALDI-ISD imaging. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging Guided Proteomics Unveils Heterogeniety in Colorectal Carcinoma Liver Metastases – Implications for Targeted Therapies.
blomme, Arnaud; Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Delvaux, David ULg et al

in Proceedings Giga Day 2012 (2012, May 04)

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See detailIn situ protein identification in imaging mass spectrometry
Calligaris, David ULg; Debois, Delphine ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg

Scientific conference (2012, May 04)

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is an emerging tool for clinical research. MALDI MSI can be used to elucidate the relative abundance and spatial ... [more ▼]

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is an emerging tool for clinical research. MALDI MSI can be used to elucidate the relative abundance and spatial localization of peptides and proteins throughout a tissue section. For this, a matrix is applied on the tissue in either a spotted array or a homogenous coating. Acquisition of mass spectra is then carried out by performing a raster with a laser across the tissue section in a defined pattern. The spectra acquired from each position on the tissue section contain molecular weight and intensity information representative of the biomolecules at that position. One can plot the intensity of any measured ion as a function of individual pixel locations to generate m/z specific images. But, if protein desorption/ionization and subsequent MS analyses provides a measurement of molecular weight, no protein identification is performed. To achieve this, several methods have been developed. In this talk, I will first present the methods inspired by classical proteomics techniques that are regularly used to identify proteins. Bottom-up and top-down approaches have been used directly from a tissue slice, leading to the identification of some of the most abundant proteins present within the tissue slice. Then, I will present the new developments led in our lab for imaging and especially for in situ protein identification. The first example will deal with the exceptional features of FT-ICR mass spectrometry for in-source decay (ISD)-based protein identification. The benefit of mass accuracy and high mass resolution allow unequivocal assignment of ISD fragments of proteins, in the low mass range (m/z between 400 and 900), whether from pure solutions or from tissue slices. The next example is the use of a matrix “cleaning” software that reduce/remove matrix peaks thus facilitating ISD spectra analyses. Finally, proteins identification by localization and MALDI-ISD profile matching will also be a really simplistic and interesting method that will complement the immunohistological techniques commonly used to validate expression of known biomarkers within diseased tissues. [less ▲]

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See detailApplication of molecular imaging in combination with quantitative proteomic approaches to determine the molecular players of adaptation to anti-angiogenic therapy in breast cancer.
Cimino, Jonathan ULg; Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg; Calligaris, David ULg et al

Poster (2012, May 04)

The recognition of the “angiogenic switch” as a rate-limiting secondary step in tumorigenesis led to extensive pre-clinical researches on angiogenesis and finally the approval of VEGF-neutralizing ... [more ▼]

The recognition of the “angiogenic switch” as a rate-limiting secondary step in tumorigenesis led to extensive pre-clinical researches on angiogenesis and finally the approval of VEGF-neutralizing antibodies (bevacizumab) and VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKs:Sunitinib). The Sunitinib has been used clinically in patients with breast cancer refractory to other therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, like the cytotoxic therapies, these drugs do not produce lasting effects and resistance to treatment appeared clinically. Questions have emerged about the failure of anti-angiogenic therapy in clinic and the limitations of predictive preclinical models, and also about the molecular assessment of all stages of tumor adaptation and metastatic disease. To this end, we applied a quantitative proteomics and imaging mass spectrometry tools to visualize and study the profiles of proteins and small molecules associated with tumor treated or not with Sunitinib using a novel preclinical model of breast carcinoma cells. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification and quantification of concentration-dependent biomarkers in MCF-7/BOS cells exposed to 17β-estradiol by 2-D DIGE and label-free proteomics
Collodoro, Mike ULg; Lemaire, Pascale ULg; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Journal of Proteomics (2012), in press

This paper reports the identification of biomarkers resulting from the exposure of MCF-7/BOS cells to 17β-estradiol (E2). The biomarkers were identified using 2 independent and complementary techniques, 2 ... [more ▼]

This paper reports the identification of biomarkers resulting from the exposure of MCF-7/BOS cells to 17β-estradiol (E2). The biomarkers were identified using 2 independent and complementary techniques, 2-D DIGE / MALDI-TOF peptide mass fingerprint, and 2-D UPLC-ESI MS/MS. These markers form a preliminary molecular signature that can be used when testing the estrogenic activity of xenobiotics, either pure or in mixtures. [less ▲]

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See detailINTRA-TUMORAL HETEROGENEITY AND RATIONAL SELECTION OF ANTIGENS FOR TARGETED THERAPY OF LIVER METASTASES
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg; Delvaux, David ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8953

Objectives: Targeted therapies of liver metastases are gaining a major stake in current and future treatment options. However, the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Targeted therapies of liver metastases are gaining a major stake in current and future treatment options. However, the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer cells causing treatment resistance and relapse. Therefore, a rational strategy is needed to select targetable antigens that would overcome this intra-tumoral heterogeneity. Methods: After ethical committee approval, 48 fresh liver metastases of colorectal origin were prospectively collected from patients undergoing liver resection. Here we macroscopically divided the lesion in different zones and generated a unique quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in colorectal carcinoma liver metastases. Particular focus was laid on accessible proteins, a protein subclass comprising cell membrane associated and extracellular proteins. Accordingly, the tissues were ex-vivo biotinylated, affinity purified and analyzed for each zone separately using nano-UPLC-MSe proteomics technique. In total over 1500 unique proteins were statistically divided into different patterns of expression. Results: We have generated a quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in colorectal carcinoma liver metastases. The study offers insight into novel targets but also antigens against which the antibodies are already involved in clinical trials or treatment of liver metastases. Extensive clustering and validation experiments highlight novel markers that offer the potential to homogeneously cover the metastatic lesion and become better targets. Conclusions: Two such antigens, LTBP2 and TGFBI were selected for functional analysis in colorectal carcinoma cells. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that in particular TGFBI is relevant for migration and proliferation capacity of colorectal cancer cells. The suppression of this protein led to significant inhibition of tumor growth, crystalizing it as bona fide target for the development of anti-metastases therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailUV Spectroscopy of DNA Duplex and Quadruplex Structures in the Gas Phase
Rosu, Frédéric ULg; Gabelica, Valérie ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry A (2012), 116

UV absorption spectroscopy is one of the most widely used methods to monitor nucleic acid folding in solution, but the absorption readout is the weighted average contribution of all species present in ... [more ▼]

UV absorption spectroscopy is one of the most widely used methods to monitor nucleic acid folding in solution, but the absorption readout is the weighted average contribution of all species present in solution. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, is able to separate constituents of the solution based on their mass, but methods to probe the structure of each constituent are needed. Here, we explored whether gas-phase UV spectroscopy can give an indication of DNA folding in ions isolated by electrospray mass spectrometry. Model DNA single strands, duplexes, and G-quadruplexes were extracted from solution by electrospray; the anions were stored in a quadrupole ion trap and irradiated by a tunable laser to obtain the UV action spectra of each complex. We found that the duplex and quadruplex spectra are significantly different from the spectra of single strands, thereby suggesting that electronic spectroscopy can be used to probe the DNA gas-phase structure and obtain information about the intrinsic properties of high-order DNA structure. [less ▲]

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