References of "Dassargues, Alain"
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See detailCarte hydrogéologique, Gemmenich - Botzelaar 35/5-6, Henri-Chapelle - Raeren 43/1-2, Petergensfeld 43/3, 1/25.000 : [notice explicative]
Ruthy, Ingrid ULg; Dassargues, Alain ULg

Book published by Ministère de la Région wallonne, Direction générale des ressources naturelles et de l'environnement - Edition provisoire : juin 2003 (2003)

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See detailCarte hydrogéologique de Wallonie, Dalhem - Herve 42/3-4, 1/25.000 : [notice explicative]
Ruthy, Ingrid ULg; Dassargues, Alain ULg

Book published by Ministère de la Région wallonne, Direction générale des ressources naturelles et de l'environnement - Edition provisoire : mai 2003 (2003)

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See detailCarte hydrogéologique de Wallonie, Jehay-Bodegnée - Saint-Georges 41/7-8, 1/25.000 : [notice explicative]
Ruthy, Ingrid ULg; Dassargues, Alain ULg

Book published by Ministère de la Région wallonne, Direction générale des ressources naturelles et de l'environnement - Edition provisoire : mai 2003 (2003)

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See detailImpact du drainage des terrains de Spanolux sur la source de Ville-du-Bois : contexte hydrogéologique et solutions
Dachy, Marie; Sage, Sandrine; Grandjean, Gilles et al

Report (2003)

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See detailDevelopment of a database linked to a GIS for coupling with groundwater modelling tools
Ruthy, Ingrid ULg; Orban, Philippe ULg; Gogu, Radu Constantin et al

in Iu (Ed.) Computational Methods in Engineering and Science (2003)

Groundwater analysis strongly depends on the availability of large volumes of high-quality data. Putting all data in a coherent and logical structure supported by a computing environment helps ensure ... [more ▼]

Groundwater analysis strongly depends on the availability of large volumes of high-quality data. Putting all data in a coherent and logical structure supported by a computing environment helps ensure validity and availability and provides a powerful tool for hydrogeological studies. A hydrogeological Geographical Information System (GIS) database that offers facilities for hydrogeological modeling has been designed in Belgium for the Walloon Region. Interest is growing in the potential for integrating GIS technology and groundwater simulation models. A “loose-coupling” tool was created between the spatial database scheme and the groundwater numerical model interface GMS© (Groundwater Modeling System). Following time and spatial queries, the hydrogeological data stored in the database can be easily used within different groundwater numerical models. [less ▲]

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See detailCombining stochastic simulations and inverse modelling for delineation of groundwater well capture zones
Rentier, Céline; Roubens, Marc ULg; Dassargues, Alain ULg

in Iu (Ed.) Computational Methods in Engineering and Science (2003)

In hydrogeology, protection zones of a spring or a pumping well are often delimited by isochrones that are computed using calibrated groundwater flow and transport models. In heterogeneous formations, all ... [more ▼]

In hydrogeology, protection zones of a spring or a pumping well are often delimited by isochrones that are computed using calibrated groundwater flow and transport models. In heterogeneous formations, all direct and indirect data, respectively called hard and soft data, must be used in an optimal way. Approaches involving in situ pumping and tracer tests, combined with geophysical and/or other geological observations, are developed. In a deterministic framework, the calibrated model is considered as the best representation of the reality at the current investigation stage, but result uncertainty remains unquantified. Using stochastic methods, a range of equally likely isochrones can be produced allowing to quantify the influence of our knowledge of the aquifer parameters on protection zone uncertainty. Furthermore, integration of soft data in a conditioned stochastic generation process, possibly associated with an inverse modeling procedure, can reduce the resulting uncertainty. A stochastic methodology for protection zone delineation integrating hydraulic conductivity measurements (hard data), head observations and electrical resistivity data (soft data) is proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailIntrinsic vulnerability mapping using the PI method Néblon basin (Belgium)
Lomba, Valérie; Dassargues, Alain ULg

in Zwahlen, François (Ed.) Vulnerability and risk mapping for the protection of carbonate (karst) aquifers, COST620 final report (2003)

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See detailFrom data collection to map validation: analytical and numerical modelling
Dassargues, Alain ULg; Popescu, Ileana Cristina

in Zwahlen, François (Ed.) Vulnerability and risk mapping for the protection of carbonate (karst) aquifers, COST620 final report (2003)

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See detailComparison of aquifer vulnerability assessment techniques. Application to the Neblon river basin (Belgium)
Gogu, Radu Constantin; Hallet, Vincent; Dassargues, Alain ULg

in Environmental Geology (2003), 44(8), 881-892

Five different methods for assessing intrinsic aquifer vulnerability were tested in a case study and their results compared. The test area was a slightly karstified district in the Condroz region of ... [more ▼]

Five different methods for assessing intrinsic aquifer vulnerability were tested in a case study and their results compared. The test area was a slightly karstified district in the Condroz region of Belgium. The basin covers about 65 km(2) and the karst aquifer provides a water-supply of about 28,000 m(3)d(-1). The methods tested were: EPIK (Doerfliger et al. 1999), DRASTIC (Aller et al.1987), 'German method' (von Hoyer and Sofner 1998), GOD (Foster 1987) and ISIS (Civita and De Regibus 1995). The results are compared and critically examined. From the analysis, it seems that reducing the number of parameters is unsatisfactory, due to the variety of geological conditions. The various methods produce very different results at any given site. As only physically-based methods can be checked for their reliability, it is clear that future vulnerability mapping techniques must incorporate such methods. [less ▲]

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See detailComplex Hydrogeological Study of the Alluvial Transboundary Aquifer of Szamos/Somes (Romania-Hungary)
Lenart, Laszlo; Madarasz, Tamas; Miko, Lajos et al

in Water resources management in the 21th century. Subtheme 4, Relevance and sustainability of the intensive groundwater developments (2003)

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See detailStochastic modelling of the hydrogeological environment in low permeability sediment
Huysmans, Marijke; Berckmans, Arne; Feyen, Luc et al

in Proceedings of IAMG 2003 (2003)

In Belgium, the Boom Clay is being considered as a potential host formation for the disposal of nuclear waste. Part of the safety assessment and feasibility studies of a potential nuclear waste disposal ... [more ▼]

In Belgium, the Boom Clay is being considered as a potential host formation for the disposal of nuclear waste. Part of the safety assessment and feasibility studies of a potential nuclear waste disposal consists of hydrogeological modeling. In order to model the groundwater flow and possible radionuclide transport in the clay, the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity of the clay has to be assessed. In this study, geostatistical methods are used to characterize the hydraulic conductivity field. More specific, direct sequential simulation of the hydraulic conductivity is carried out, using measurements of hydraulic conductivity and 4 types of soft data or secondary variables: resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, grain size measurements and descriptions of the lithology. The primary and secondary information is analyzed with geostatistical tools and combined to generate 100 fields of the hydraulic conductivity of the Boom Clay. Next, each field is input to a groundwater flow model to predict the advective travel time of constituents released from the disposed waste in the Boom Clay to the aquifers surrounding the Boom Clay. Statistical analysis of the ensemble of model predictions results in a predictive distribution for the advective travel time. This distribution reflects the uncertainty of the advective travel time that results from the uncertainty of the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity of the Boom Clay [less ▲]

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