References of "Dassargues, Alain"
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See detailImpact des changements climatiques sur la principale réserve en eau souterraine alimentant la ville de Liège (Belgique)
Goderniaux, Pascal; Orban, Philippe ULg; Compère, Jean-Michel et al

in Des villes et des territoires sobres et sûrs, Synthèse des interventions (2015, June 02)

Le changement climatique amène de nouvelles 'pressions' sur les ressources en eaux de surface et souterraines dans de nombreuses zones du monde. Des travaux scientifiques sont nécessaires pour aider les ... [more ▼]

Le changement climatique amène de nouvelles 'pressions' sur les ressources en eaux de surface et souterraines dans de nombreuses zones du monde. Des travaux scientifiques sont nécessaires pour aider les gestionnaires de l'eau à planifier les changements futurs. Un générateur de climats transitoire sophistiqué est utilisé en combinaison avec une modélisation intégrée hydrologique (HydroGeoSphere) pour évaluer les impacts sur les ressources en eaux souterraines de façon probabiliste. Cette nouvelle méthodologie est appliquée pour l'aquifère crayeux de Hesbaye (bassin Geer en Belgique) qui est le principal réservoir d'eau souterraine pour l'alimentation de la ville de Liège. Les sources d'incertitude étudiées sont les suivantes: (1) l'incertitude liée à la calibration du modèle hydrologique, en utilisant 'UCODE_2005'; (2) l'incertitude liée aux modèles climatiques mondiaux et régionaux (GCM et RCM); (3) l'incertitude liée à la variabilité naturelle du climat, en utilisant des scénarios stochastiques de changement climatique locaux. 100 changements climatiques équiprobables scénarios ont été générés sur 2010-2085 pour chacun des six RMC différents. Les résultats montrent que bien que les intervalles de confiance à 95% calculés autour des niveaux piézométriques calculés restent importants, l'effet du changement climatique devient clair et plus prononcé que la variabilité naturelle du climat d'ici 2085. Cette méthodologie constitue une réelle amélioration dans le domaine des prévisions de l'évolution des réserves en eau souterraine dans des conditions de changement climatique car il permet aux gestionnaires d'analyser les risques et prendre des décisions en toute connaissance du degré de confiance des résultats. [less ▲]

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See detailLanduse change and future flood risk: an integrated and multi-scale approach
Dewals, Benjamin ULg; Bruwier, Martin ULg; Mohamed El Saeid Mustafa, Ahmed ULg et al

in E-proceedings of the 36th IAHR World Congress (2015, June)

The goal of this research is a better understanding of the complex interactions between landuse change and future flood risk. Landuse change is mainly driven by population growth and socio-economic ... [more ▼]

The goal of this research is a better understanding of the complex interactions between landuse change and future flood risk. Landuse change is mainly driven by population growth and socio-economic factors. It affects future flood risk by altering catchment hydrology and vulnerability in the floodplains, as well as through the feedback effect that changes in flood hazard may have on landuse evolution. The research is based on a chain of modelling tools, including: stochastic landuse change modelling, traffic modelling as well as Land-Use and Transport Interactions models, continuous hydrological modelling and efficient hydraulic modelling of floodplains inundation. The coupling of these modelling tools will allow assessing direct and indirect impacts of land use change on future flood risk, while considering the uncertainties related to each of these processes and their combinations at a 2100 time horizon. [less ▲]

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See detailSensitivity and vulnerability to groundwater overexploitation by a ‘pressure state impact’ and process based approach
Beaujean, Jean; Lemieux, Jean-Michel; Therrien, René et al

Conference (2015, May 26)

A methodology is developed for proposing a groundwater vulnerability assessment in a Pressure-State-Impact causal chain that is familiar to decision makers. The ‘Driver Pressure State Impact Response’ ... [more ▼]

A methodology is developed for proposing a groundwater vulnerability assessment in a Pressure-State-Impact causal chain that is familiar to decision makers. The ‘Driver Pressure State Impact Response’ (DPSIR) framework, for describing interactions between society and the environment, defines a chain of Drivers that exert Pressures on the State of a given resource, such as groundwater, which then generates an Impact that will require an appropriate Response (Kristensen, 2004). The method is here based on the calculation of sensitivity coefficients for a user-defined groundwater state for which several physically-based indicators are proposed. These sensitivity coefficients reflect the easiness with which the groundwater state transmits pressures into impacts. They are grouped into a vulnerability matrix of pressures and impacts that quantify vulnerability for every combination of causal links identified in the DPSIR chain. For that reason, the sensitivity coefficients are converted to vulnerability, using the concept of ‘transgressing a given threshold’, which is commonly used in socioeconomic sciences (Luers et al. 2003). The concept of ‘rising above a given concentration threshold’ can be used for groundwater quality issues. The concept of ‘falling below a given piezometric head threshold’ can be used for groundwater quantity issues as aquifer overexploitation problems. Outside the careful selection of the sensitivity analysis method that can significantly influence the computational effort (Beaujean et al., 2013), emphasis is given to the illustration of the general methodology on a simple groundwater quantity case (of an alluvial aquifer with concerns related to water supply) demonstrating the potential use of this general and physically based vulnerability assessment method. While the methodology is general, the choice of causal chains has to be made prior to the calculation. The vulnerability is also related to a damaged state and is related to the ‘distance’ between the current state and a given threshold. This choice is arbitrary such that the vulnerability is sensitive to the choice of the threshold. [less ▲]

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See detailProcess-based method for groundwater resource vulnerability mapping with regards to solute contamination at the surface
Popescu, Cristina; Brouyère, Serge ULg; Orban, Philippe ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 26)

Numerous groundwater vulnerability methods have been developed taking into consideration a variable number of factors. The most common techniques are based on calculation of an index expressing the ... [more ▼]

Numerous groundwater vulnerability methods have been developed taking into consideration a variable number of factors. The most common techniques are based on calculation of an index expressing the protective effect of underground formations overlying the groundwater resource. However, it has been shown that different overlay and index methods applied to the same system can yield dramatically dissimilar results (among others, Gogu et al., 2003). The limitation of most of these methods is related to their use of a qualitative definition of groundwater vulnerability, as opposed to a definition based on a quantitative description of contaminant migration. A process-based point of view is proposed and based on three factors describing a pollution event (Brouyère et al., 2001): (1) the transit time from the source to the target, (2) the duration of the contamination breakthrough at the target, (3) the ratio between the maximum concentration at the target to the released concentration at the contamination source. The assessment can then be based on the impulse response at the ‘target’ to a Dirac-type solicitation (point, unit mass, instantaneous source of pollution), considering only physical hydrodispersive processes for intrinsic vulnerability and both physical and biochemical processes for specific vulnerability. The breakthrough curve obtained after a vertical transfer through the overlying layers can be computed pixel by pixel. Automatically processing the columns with identical characteristics, 1D partially saturated flow and solute transport computations are performed. Different maps are obtained for the three above mentioned factors. On the basis of these results, different vulnerability maps can be built according to the weighting coefficients agreed by the local community or decision makers. This concept allows a clear distinction between conventional aspects and process-based results in the building of a final vulnerability indicator. This methodology has the further advantage to consider the possible impact of runoff conditions occurring at the land surface and possibly leading to lateral contamination of groundwater through downstream preferential infiltration features. To solve this problem, Popescu et al. (2004 & 2008) and Dassargues et al. (2009) proposed a method for quantifying a lateral “dangerosity” coefficient using runoff coefficients based on land use, slopes, and soil properties. A test application is illustrated on a case-study located in a limestone basin in Belgium. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors controlling Si export from soils: A soil column approach
Ronchi, Benedicta; Barao, Lucia; Clymans, Wim et al

in Catena (2015), 133

The release of dissolved silicon (DSi) from A and B horizons was investigated with leaching tests on unsaturated columns. As forest A horizons have larger biogenic Si (BSi) pools than arable lands, we ... [more ▼]

The release of dissolved silicon (DSi) from A and B horizons was investigated with leaching tests on unsaturated columns. As forest A horizons have larger biogenic Si (BSi) pools than arable lands, we compared the Si release from a forest and a cropland from the same geographical region developed on a Luvisol in Belgium and a Cambisol in Sweden. The A horizons released a quickly dissolving Si fraction in contrast to the B horizons, which did contain no or only little amounts of BSi and released lower Si concentrations. Our experiments show that Si export from forest soils is high because of the presence of a large reservoir of soluble BSi as well as due to the acidity of the soil (pH<4). Leaching at two different water fluxes revealed that export in forest soils was transport controlled while cropland soils were in equilibrium. [less ▲]

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See detailCarte hydrogéologique de Wallonie, Chastre - Gembloux 40/5-6
Ruthy, Ingrid ULg; Dassargues, Alain ULg

Cartographic material (2015)

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See detailCarte hydrogéologique de Wallonie, Reinartzhof – Hoscheit, 43/7-8
Gilson, Mylene; Briers, Pierre ULg; Ruthy, Ingrid ULg et al

Cartographic material (2015)

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See detailCarte hydrogéologique de Wallonie, Maffe - Grandhan 54/3-4
Ruthy, Ingrid ULg; Dassargues, Alain ULg

Cartographic material (2015)

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See detailCarte hydrogéologique de Wallonie, Chastre - Gembloux, 40/5-6, 1/25.000 : [notice explicative]
Ruthy, Ingrid ULg; Dassargues, Alain ULg

Book published by Service Public de Wallonie, DGARNE - Actualisation partielle: septembre 2014 (2015)

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See detailCarte hydrogéologique de Wallonie, Maffe - Grandhan 54/3-4, 1/25.000 : [notice explicative]
Ruthy, Ingrid ULg; Dassargues, Alain ULg

Book published by Service Public de Wallonie, DGARNE - Actualisation partielle: février 2015 - Première version: juillet 2006 (2015)

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See detailCarte hydrogéologique de Wallonie, Reinartzhof – Hoscheit, 43/7-8, 1/25.000 : [notice explicative]
Gilson, Mylene; Briers, Pierre ULg; Ruthy, Ingrid ULg et al

Book published by Service Public de Wallonie, DGARNE - Actualisation partielle: janvier 2015 - Première version: aout 2012 (2015)

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See detailVadose zone characterisation at industrial contaminated sites
Fernandez de Vera, Natalia ULg; Dahan, Ofer; Dassargues, Alain ULg et al

in CL:AIRE bulletin (2015)

In order to improve risk characterization and remediation measures for soil and groundwater contamination, there is a need to improve in situ vadose zone characterization. However, most available ... [more ▼]

In order to improve risk characterization and remediation measures for soil and groundwater contamination, there is a need to improve in situ vadose zone characterization. However, most available technologies have been developed in the context of agricultural soils. Such methodologies are not applicable at industrial sites, where soils and contamination differ in origin and composition. To overcome such difficulties, a vadose zone experiment has been setup at a former industrial site in Belgium. Industrial activities carried out on site left a legacy of soil and groundwater contamination in BTEX, PAH, cyanide and heavy metals. The experiment comprises the combination of two techniques: the Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VMS) and cross-hole geophysics. The VMS allows continuous measurements of water content at different depths of the vadose zone, as well as the possibility of water sampling at different depths. The system is formed by a flexible sleeve containing monitoring units along its depth which is installed in a slanted borehole. The flexible sleeve contains three types of monitoring units in the vadose zone: Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT), which allows water content measurements; Vadose Sampling Ports (VSP), used for collecting water samples coming from the matrix; the Fracture Samplers (FS), which are used for retrieving water samples from the fractures. Cross-hole geophysics techniques consist in the injection of an electrical current using electrodes installed in vertical boreholes. From such injections, spatial patterns related with subsurface heterogeneities, water content and solute concentrations are inferred. Two VMS were installed in two slanted boreholes on site, together with four vertical boreholes containing electrodes for geophysical measurements. The site was monitored under natural recharge conditions. Results show the reaction of the vadose zone to rainfall events, as well as chemical evolution of soil water with depth and rainfall infiltration. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative temperature monitoring of a heat tracing experiment using cross-borehole ERT
Hermans, Thomas ULg; Wildemeersch, Samuel ULg; Jamin, Pierre ULg et al

in Geothermics (2015), 53

The growing demand for renewable energy leads to an increase in the development of geothermal energy projects and heat has become a common tracer in hydrology and hydrogeology. Designing geothermal ... [more ▼]

The growing demand for renewable energy leads to an increase in the development of geothermal energy projects and heat has become a common tracer in hydrology and hydrogeology. Designing geothermal systems requires a multidisciplinary approach including geological and hydrogeological aspects. In this context, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can bring relevant, qualitative and quantitative information on the temperature distribution in operating shallow geothermal systems or during heat tracing experiments. We followed a heat tracing experiment in an alluvial aquifer using cross-borehole time-lapse ERT. Heated water was injected in a well while water of the aquifer was extracted at another well. An ERT section was set up across the main flow direction. The results of ERT were transformed into temperature using calibrated petrophysical relationships. These ERT-derived temperatures were then compared to direct temperature measurements in control piezometers collected with distributed temperature sensing (DTS) and groundwater temperature loggers. Spatially, it enabled to map the horizontal and vertical extent of the heated water plume, as well as the zones where maximum temperatures occurred. Quantitatively, the temperatures and breakthrough curves estimated from ERT were in good agreement with the ones observed directly during the rise and maximum of the curve. An overestimation, likely related to 3D effects, was observed for the tail of the heat breakthrough curve. The error made on temperature can be estimated to be between 10 to 20 %, which is a fair value for indirect measurements. From our data, we estimated a quantification threshold for temperature variation of 1.2°C. These results suggest that ERT should be considered when designing heat tracing experiments or geothermal systems. It could help also to assess the geometrical complexity of the concerned reservoirs. It also appears that ERT could be a useful tool to monitor and control geothermal systems once they are in operation. [less ▲]

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See detailLanduse change and future flood risk: the influence of micro-scale spatial patterns (FloodLand) - 2nd progress report
Dewals, Benjamin ULg; Bruwier, Martin ULg; El Saeid Mustafa, Ahmed Mohamed ULg et al

Report (2014)

The goal of the project FloodLand is to investigate the complex interactions between landuse change and future flood risk. Landuse change is assumed to be mainly driven by population growth and socio ... [more ▼]

The goal of the project FloodLand is to investigate the complex interactions between landuse change and future flood risk. Landuse change is assumed to be mainly driven by population growth and socio-economic factors. It affects future flood risk by altering catchment hydrology as well as vulnerability in the floodplains; but the feedback effect of (the perception of) changes in flood hazard on landuse evolution is also considered. The research is based on a chain of modelling tools, which represent parts of the natural and human systems, including: landuse change modelling, transportation modelling as an onset for the estimation of indirect flood damage, continuous hydrological modelling (forced by precipitation and temperature data disturbed according to climate change scenarios), as well as efficient hydraulic modelling of inundation flow in the floodplains. Besides reproducing a broad spectrum of processes, the modelling approach spans over multiple scales, from the regional or catchment level down to the floodplain and building levels. This distinctive feature is reflected both within the individual models and through their combination involving fine-scale detailed analyses (or data) embedded within coarser models at a broader level. [less ▲]

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