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See detailInorganic and organic carbon spatial variability in the Congo River during high waters (December 2013)
Borges, Alberto ULg; Bouillon, S; Teodoru, C et al

Poster (2014, April 27)

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See detailThe age of river-transported carbon: new data from African catchments and a global perspective
Marwick, TR; Tamooh, F; Teodoru, C et al

Conference (2014, April 27)

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See detailDisproportionate contribution of riparian inputs to organic carbon in freshwater systems
Marwick, TR; Van Acker, K; Darchambeau, François ULg et al

Conference (2014, April 27)

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See detailNO3- Reduction is Fe-Dependent in a Ferruginous Chemocline
Michiels, C.; Darchambeau, François ULg; Roland, Fleur ULg et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailDisproportionate contribution of riparian inputs to organic carbon in freshwater systems
Marwick, TR; Van Acker, K; Borges, Alberto ULg et al

Poster (2014)

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See detailThe age of river-transported carbon: new data from African catchments and a global perspective
Marwick, TR; Tamooh, F; Teodoru, CR et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailCarbon Cycling of Lake Kivu (East Africa): Net Autotrophy in the Epilimnion and Emission of CO2 to the Atmosphere Sustained by Geogenic Inputs
Borges, Alberto ULg; Morana, C; Bouillon, S et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9(10), 109500

We report organic and inorganic carbon distributions and fluxes in a large (>2000 km2) oligotrophic, tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa), acquired during four field surveys, that captured the seasonal ... [more ▼]

We report organic and inorganic carbon distributions and fluxes in a large (>2000 km2) oligotrophic, tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa), acquired during four field surveys, that captured the seasonal variations (March 2007–mid rainy season, September 2007–late dry season, June 2008–early dry season, and April 2009–late rainy season). The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in surface waters of the main basin of Lake Kivu showed modest spatial (coefficient of variation between 3% and 6%), and seasonal variations with an amplitude of 163 ppm (between 579±23 ppm on average in March 2007 and 742±28 ppm on average in September 2007). The most prominent spatial feature of the pCO2 distribution was the very high pCO2 values in Kabuno Bay (a small sub-basin with little connection to the main lake) ranging between 11213 ppm and 14213 ppm (between 18 and 26 times higher than in the main basin). Surface waters of the main basin of Lake Kivu were a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere at an average rate of 10.8 mmol m−2 d−1, which is lower than the global average reported for freshwater, saline, and volcanic lakes. In Kabuno Bay, the CO2 emission to the atmosphere was on average 500.7 mmol m−2 d−1 (~46 times higher than in the main basin). Based on whole-lake mass balance of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) bulk concentrations and of its stable carbon isotope composition, we show that the epilimnion of Lake Kivu was net autotrophic. This is due to the modest river inputs of organic carbon owing to the small ratio of catchment area to lake surface area (2.15). The carbon budget implies that the CO2 emission to the atmosphere must be sustained by DIC inputs of geogenic origin from deep geothermal springs. [less ▲]

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See detailNew Insights into Iron-Based Photosynthesis
Thompson, K; Lliros, M; Borrego, C et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailDisproportionate contribution of riparian inputs to organic carbon pools in freshwater systems
Marwick, T.R.; Borges, Alberto ULg; Van Acker, K. et al

in Ecosystems (2014), 17

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See detailContrasting biogeochemical characteristics of the Oubangui River and tributaries (Congo River basin)
Bouillon, Steven; Yambélé, Athanase; Gillikin, David P. et al

in Scientific Reports (2014), 4

The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to ... [more ▼]

The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to humid rainforest. Compared to a 2-year monitoring record on the mainstem Oubangui, these tributaries show a wide range of biogeochemical signatures, from highly diluted blackwaters (low turbidity, pH, conductivity, and total alkalinity) in rainforests to those more typical for savannah systems. Spectral analyses of chromophoric dissolved organic matter showed wide temporal variations in the Oubangui compared to spatio-temporal variations in the tributaries, and confirm that different pools of dissolved organic carbon are mobilized during different hydrological stages. d13C of dissolved inorganic carbon ranged between -28.1 per mil and -25.8 per mil, and was strongly correlated to both partial pressure of CO2 and to the estimated contribution of carbonate weathering to total alkalinity, suggesting an important control of the weathering regime on CO2 fluxes. All tributaries were oversaturated in dissolved greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, CO2), with highest levels in rivers draining rainforest. The high diversity observed underscores the importance of sampling that covers the variability in subcatchment characteristics, to improve our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in the Congo Basin. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction of dissolved organic matter by phytoplankton and its uptake by heterotrophic prokaryotes in large tropical lakes
Morana, Cédric; Sarmento, Hugo; Descy, Jean-Pierre et al

in Limnology & Oceanography (2014), 59(4), 1364-1375

In pelagic ecosystems, phytoplankton extracellular release can extensively subsidize the heterotrophic prokaryotic carbon demand. Time-course experiments were carried out to quantify primary production ... [more ▼]

In pelagic ecosystems, phytoplankton extracellular release can extensively subsidize the heterotrophic prokaryotic carbon demand. Time-course experiments were carried out to quantify primary production, phytoplankton excretion, and the microbial uptake of freshly released dissolved organic carbon (DOC) derived from phytoplankton extracellular release (DOCp) in four large tropical lakes distributed along a productivity gradient: Kivu, Edward, Albert, and Victoria. The contributions of the major heterotrophic bacterial groups to the uptake of DOCp was also analyzed in Lake Kivu, using microautoradiography coupled to catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescent in situ hybridization. The percentage of extracellular release (PER) varied across the productivity gradient, with higher values at low productivity. Furthermore, PER was significantly related to high light and low phosphate concentrations in the mixed layer and was comparatively higher in oligotrophic tropical lakes than in their temperate counterparts. Both observations suggest that environmental factors play a key role in the control of phytoplankton excretion. Standing stocks of DOCp were small and generally contributed less than 1% to the total DOC because it was rapidly assimilated by prokaryotes. In other words, there was a tight coupling between the production and the heterotrophic consumption of DOCp. None of the major phylogenetic bacterial groups that were investigated differed in their ability to take up DOCp, in contrast with earlier results reported for standard labeled single-molecule substrates (leucine, glucose, adenosine triphosphate). It supports the idea that the metabolic ability to use DOCp is widespread among heterotrophic prokaryotes. Overall, these results highlight the importance of carbon transfer between phytoplankton and bacterioplankton in large African lakes. [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding the performance of the FLake model over two African Great Lakes
Thiery, Wim; Martynov, Andrey; Darchambeau, François ULg et al

in Geoscientific Model Development [=GMD] (2014), 7

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See detailLakeMIP Kivu: evaluating the representation of a large, deep tropical lake by a set of one-dimensional lake models
Thiery, Wim; Stepanenko, Victor M.; Fang, Xing et al

in Tellus : Series A (2014), 66

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