References of "Danthine, Sabine"
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See detailFlaxseed proteins: food uses and health benefits flaxseed proteins
Rabetafika, Holy-Nadia ULg; Van Remoortel, Vinciane ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

in International Journal of Food Science & Technology (2011), 46(2), 221-228

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See detailEffect of ageing on different egg yolk fractions on surface properties at the air–water interface
Freschi, Jérôme ULg; Razafindralambo, Hary ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

in International Journal of Food Science & Technology (2011), 46

The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of egg ageing on the surface properties of whole and fractionated yolk at the air–water interface. Eggs were stored at 4 Cfor 24 h, 1 week and 3 weeks ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of egg ageing on the surface properties of whole and fractionated yolk at the air–water interface. Eggs were stored at 4 Cfor 24 h, 1 week and 3 weeks after laying.A laboratory scale fractionation process was then applied at each ageing time. Egg yolk was separated into two fractions, plasma composed of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) and livetins, and granules formed by highdensity lipoproteins (HDLs), phosvitins and LDLg (g = granule). Moreover, recombined plasma and granules fractions were investigated to highlight a potential synergic effect on surface properties. Results have shown the main contribution of LDLs on surface properties of yolk and an improvement of granules surface properties when they are disrupted. Moreover, ageing affected surface properties differently depending on the considered fractions. Broken LDLsand disrupted granules could explain this observed behaviour. Recombined fractions showed different compression isotherms at the air–water interface than whole yolk. [less ▲]

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See detailRegio-selective enzymatic interesterification combined with dry fractionation to produce cocoa butter equivalent.
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Vanden Bossche, sandrine ULg; Maes, Jeroen et al

in Récents Progrès en Génie des Procédés (2011), 101

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See detailTechniques de séchage des starters lactiques et mécanismes affectant la viabilité cellulaire suite à la lyophilisation
Coulibaly, Ibourahema ULg; Dubois Dauphin, Robin ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), 15(2), 287-299

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See detailThe effect of symmetric/asymmetric TAG ratio on the crystallization properties and storage stability of fat blends
DeGraef, V.; Vereecken, J.; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailTechnofonctionalité des lipides alimentaires
Danthine, Sabine ULg

Conference (2010, July 01)

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See detailStructuring effects of different lecithins on palm oil-based blends
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Delacharlerie, Sophie ULg; Flöter, Eckhard

Conference (2010, May 18)

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See detailMILK INGREDIENT ENRICHED IN POLAR LIPIDS AND USES THEREOF
Dalemans, Daniel; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Bodson, Pascal et al

Patent (2010)

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See detailMilk fat globule membrane and buttermilks: from composition to valorization
Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Bodson, Pascal; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2010), 14(3), 485-500

Buttermilk, the by-product from butter manufacture, is low cost and available in large quantities but has been considered for many years as invaluable. However, over the last two decades it has gained ... [more ▼]

Buttermilk, the by-product from butter manufacture, is low cost and available in large quantities but has been considered for many years as invaluable. However, over the last two decades it has gained considerable attention due to its specific composition in proteins and polar lipids from the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). The aim of this review is to take stock of current buttermilk knowledge. Firstly, the milk fat globule membrane composition and structure are described. Secondly, buttermilk and its associated products are defined according to the milk fat making process. Structure and mean composition of these products are summarized from recent dairy research data and related to technological properties, especially the emulsifying properties provided by MFGM components. Finally, new applications are presented, leading to promising valorizations of buttermilk and its derivate products. [less ▲]

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See detailENZYMATIC INTERESTERIFICATION OF PALM OIL AND FRACTIONS
Gibon, Véronique; Danthine, Sabine ULg; De Clercq, Nathalie et al

Conference (2009, May)

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See detailInteresterification of rapeseed oil with anhydrous milk fat and its stearin fraction. II. Modifications of melting properties
Giet, Jean-Michel ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Hanon, Emilien ULg et al

in GCIRC Bulletin (2009), 25

Chemical and/or physical modification of oils and fats are commonly used by food industry to widen their range of applications (1,2). Lipase-catalysed interesterification of anhydrous milk fat (AMF) and ... [more ▼]

Chemical and/or physical modification of oils and fats are commonly used by food industry to widen their range of applications (1,2). Lipase-catalysed interesterification of anhydrous milk fat (AMF) and various vegetable oils is now a well documented procedure (3-7). The purpose of this technique is to produce original structured fats with properties different from a simple blending, that may be used as spreads or introduced into pastry. The new fats contain higher amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) than butter, which provides health benefits (8,9). To our knowledge only a few authors associated AMF fractionation with blending and interesterification (10,11), although this combination may be used to increase the ratio of vegetable oil in blends and thus the PUFA content of the product. The compositional changes occurring during the lipase-catalysed interesterification of AMF/rapeseed oil (RO) and AMF stearin fraction (AMFSF)/RO blends were described in the first part of this study. In the present and second part are reported the resulting changes in physical properties, especially the melting behaviour through solid fat content (SFC), dropping point (DP) and fusion profiles by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). [less ▲]

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See detailIntersterification of rapessed oil with anhydrous milk fat and its stearin fraction. I. Modifications of composition
Aguedo, Mario ULg; Giet, Jean-Michel ULg; Hanon, Emilien ULg et al

in GCIRC Bulletin (2009), 25

Milk fat in human diet is associated with cardiovascular diseases due to its high content in saturated fatty acids and cholesterol. Most vegetable oils are much healthier as they are rich in unsaturated ... [more ▼]

Milk fat in human diet is associated with cardiovascular diseases due to its high content in saturated fatty acids and cholesterol. Most vegetable oils are much healthier as they are rich in unsaturated fatty acids (1,2). Lipase-catalysed interesterification of oils and fats has arisen as an alternative to hydrogenation or chemical processes to produce margarine and shortenings (3), notably because they do not give rise to undesirable trans fatty acids (4). The enzyme exchanges fatty acids from one triglyceride to another, resulting in a redistribution of fatty acids species. For such a reaction, the lipase of Thermomyces lanuginosa was shown to be an efficient tool in solvent-free fat blends batches and micro-aqueous conditions (5). Enzymatic interesterification can thus be used to enrich “hard” fats with unsaturated fatty acids (6,7). As an illustration, rapeseed oil (RO) (a choice source of unsaturation-rich residues) was used in the present study to enrich anhydrous milk fat (AMF) with unsaturated C18 fatty acids (FA) (oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids). Comparatively, one “harder” fraction of AMF underwent the same reaction. The physico-chemical properties modifications induced by the reaction were followed. The compositional changes are reported in this first part and the consequent physical modifications are presented in a second part. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysicochemical characterization of fat blends related to margarine formulation
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Fernando Munoz, J; Cavillot, V et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailEnzymatic interesterification of anhydrous milk fat with rapeseed and/or linseed oil: oxidative stability
Giet, Jean-Michel ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2009), 57(15), 6787-6794

Blends of anhydrous milkfat (AMF) and linseed oil (70/30), and AMF, rapeseed oil (RO) and linseed oil (LO), 70/20/10, were submitted to enzymatic interesterification. The oxidative stability of the blends ... [more ▼]

Blends of anhydrous milkfat (AMF) and linseed oil (70/30), and AMF, rapeseed oil (RO) and linseed oil (LO), 70/20/10, were submitted to enzymatic interesterification. The oxidative stability of the blends, the interesterified (IE) blends and IE blends with 50 ppm -tocopherol added as antioxidant were studied. Samples were stored in open flasks at 60°C, 25°C and 4°C, and periodically submitted to peroxide, p-anisidine, TBA value determination and UV measurement at 232 and 268 nm. The analysis of volatile compounds was carried out by SPME for the samples stored at 60°C. Peroxides appeared to be the only significant oxidation products after 12 weeks storage at 4°C. As expected, the binary blends (BB) were more sensitive to oxidation than the ternary blends (TB). The BB were associated with increased volatile emission compared to TB. Interesterification led to variable effects on the oxidation of fat mixtures, depending on composition and temperature (beneficial effect on BB, at both 25°C and 60°C, and a rather neutral effect on TB). The IE blends exhibited higher volatile release prior to ageing. A pro-oxidant effect of -tocopherol addition was observed at 25°C on both BB and TB. At 60°C, an antioxidant effect was observed on TB. [less ▲]

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See detailInteresterification of rapeseed oil with anhydrous milk fat and its stearin fraction
Aguedo, Mario ULg; Giet, Jean-Michel ULg; Hanon, Emilien ULg et al

Poster (2009)

Rapeseed oil (RO) (a choice source of unsaturation-rich residues) was used in the present study to enrich anhydrous milk fat (AMF) with unsaturated C18 fatty acids (FA) (oleic, linoleic and linolenic ... [more ▼]

Rapeseed oil (RO) (a choice source of unsaturation-rich residues) was used in the present study to enrich anhydrous milk fat (AMF) with unsaturated C18 fatty acids (FA) (oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids). Comparatively, one “harder” fraction of AMF underwent the same reaction. The physico-chemical properties modifications induced by the reaction were followed. The compositional changes are reported in this first part and the consequent physical modifications are presented in a second part. [less ▲]

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See detailInteresterification of rapeseed oil with anhydrous milk fat and its stearin fraction
Giet, Jean-Michel ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Hanon, Emilien ULg et al

Poster (2009)

The compositional changes occurring during the lipase-catalysed interesterification of AMF/rapeseed oil (RO) and AMF stearin fraction (AMFSF)/RO blends were described in the first part of this study. In ... [more ▼]

The compositional changes occurring during the lipase-catalysed interesterification of AMF/rapeseed oil (RO) and AMF stearin fraction (AMFSF)/RO blends were described in the first part of this study. In the present and second part are reported the resulting changes in physical properties, especially the melting behaviour through solid fat content (SFC), dropping point (DP) and fusion profiles by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (16 ULg)