References of "Dang Vu, Thien Thanh"
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See detailActive brain processes during human quiescent sleep
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, M.; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2006, September), 15(Suppl. 1), 51

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See detailA role for sleep in brain plasticity.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Pediatric Rehabilitation (2006), 9(2), 98-118

The idea that sleep might be involved in brain plasticity has been investigated for many years through a large number of animal and human studies, but evidence remains fragmentary. Large amounts of sleep ... [more ▼]

The idea that sleep might be involved in brain plasticity has been investigated for many years through a large number of animal and human studies, but evidence remains fragmentary. Large amounts of sleep in early life suggest that sleep may play a role in brain maturation. In particular, the influence of sleep in developing the visual system has been highlighted. The current data suggest that both Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and non-REM sleep states would be important for brain development. Such findings stress the need for optimal paediatric sleep management. In the adult brain, the role of sleep in learning and memory is emphasized by studies at behavioural, systems, cellular and molecular levels. First, sleep amounts are reported to increase following a learning task and sleep deprivation impairs task acquisition and consolidation. At the systems level, neurophysiological studies suggest possible mechanisms for the consolidation of memory traces. These imply both thalamocortical and hippocampo-neocortical networks. Similarly, neuroimaging techniques demonstrated the experience-dependent changes in cerebral activity during sleep. Finally, recent works show the modulation during sleep of cerebral protein synthesis and expression of genes involved in neuronal plasticity. [less ▲]

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See detailA prominent role for amygdaloid complexes in the Variability in Heart Rate (VHR) during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep relative to wakefulness.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2006), 32(3), 1008-1015

Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is associated with intense neuronal activity, rapid eye movements, muscular atonia and dreaming. Another important feature in REMS is the instability in autonomic ... [more ▼]

Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is associated with intense neuronal activity, rapid eye movements, muscular atonia and dreaming. Another important feature in REMS is the instability in autonomic, especially in cardiovascular regulation. The neural mechanisms underpinning the variability in heart rate (VHR) during REMS are not known in detail, especially in humans. During wakefulness, the right insula has frequently been reported as involved in cardiovascular regulation but this might not be the case during REMS. We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of VHR during REMS as compared to wakefulness and to slow wave sleep (SWS), the other main component of human sleep, in normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a set of (H2O)-O-15 positron emission tomography (PET) sleep data acquired during SWS, REMS and wakefulness. The results showed that VHR correlated more tightly during REMS than during wakefulness with the rCBF in the right amygdaloid complex. Moreover, we assessed whether functional relationships between amygdala and any brain area changed depending the state of vigilance. Only the activity within in the insula was found to covary with the amygdala, significantly more tightly during wakefulness than during REMS in relation to the VHR. The functional connectivity between the amygdala and the insular cortex, two brain areas involved in cardiovascular regulation, differs significantly in REMS as compared to wakefulness. This suggests a functional reorganization of central cardiovascular regulation during REMS. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDaytime light exposure dynamically enhances brain responses.
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Current Biology (2006), 16(16), 1616-21

In humans, light enhances both alertness and performance during nighttime and daytime [1-4] and influences regional brain function [5]. These effects do not correspond to classical visual responses but ... [more ▼]

In humans, light enhances both alertness and performance during nighttime and daytime [1-4] and influences regional brain function [5]. These effects do not correspond to classical visual responses but involve a non-image forming (NIF) system, which elicits greater endocrine, physiological, neurophysiological, and behavioral responses to shorter light wavelengths than to wavelengths geared toward the visual system [6-11]. During daytime, the neural changes induced by light exposure, and their time courses, are largely unknown. With functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterized the neural correlates of the alerting effect of daytime light by assessing the responses to an auditory oddball task [12-15], before and after a short exposure to a bright white light. Light-induced improvement in subjective alertness was linearly related to responses in the posterior thalamus. In addition, light enhanced responses in a set of cortical areas supporting attentional oddball effects, and it prevented decreases of activity otherwise observed during continuous darkness. Responses to light were remarkably dynamic. They declined within minutes after the end of the light stimulus, following various region-specific time courses. These findings suggest that light can modulate activity of subcortical structures involved in alertness, thereby dynamically promoting cortical activity in networks involved in ongoing nonvisual cognitive processes. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain imaging on passing to sleep
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Albouy, Geneviève ULg et al

in Parmeggiani, Pier Luigi; Velluti, Ricardo (Eds.) The physiologic nature of sleep (2005)

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See detailCerebral correlates of delta waves during non-REM sleep revisited.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 28(1), 14-21

We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of delta activity during Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in non-sleep-deprived normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a positron ... [more ▼]

We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of delta activity during Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in non-sleep-deprived normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a positron emission tomography (PET) sleep data set. One hundred fifteen PET scans were obtained using H(2)(15)O under continuous polygraphic monitoring during stages 2-4 of NREM sleep. Correlations between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and delta power (1.5-4 Hz) spectral density were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM2). Delta power values obtained at central scalp locations negatively correlated during NREM sleep with rCBF in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the basal forebrain, the striatum, the anterior insula, and the precuneus. These regions embrace the set of brain areas in which rCBF decreases during slow wave sleep (SWS) as compared to Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep and wakefulness (Maquet, P., Degueldre, C., Delfiore, G., Aerts, J., Peters, J.M., Luxen, A., Franck, G., 1997. Functional neuroanatomy of human slow wave sleep. J. Neurosci. 17, 2807-S2812), supporting the notion that delta activity is a valuable prominent feature of NREM sleep. A strong association was observed between rCBF in the ventromedial prefrontal regions and delta power, in agreement with electrophysiological studies. In contrast to the results of a previous PET study investigating the brain correlates of delta activity (Hofle, N., Paus, T., Reutens, D., Fiset, P., Gotman, J., Evans, A.C., Jones, B.E., 1997. Regional cerebral blood flow changes as a function of delta and spindle activity during slow wave sleep in humans. J. Neurosci. 17, 4800-4808), in which waking scans were mixed with NREM sleep scans, no correlation was found with thalamus activity. This latter result stresses the importance of an extra-thalamic delta rhythm among the synchronous NREM sleep oscillations. Consequently, this rCBF distribution might preferentially reflect a particular modulation of the cellular processes involved in the generation of cortical delta waves during NREM sleep. [less ▲]

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See detailDreaming: A Neuropsychological View
Schwartz, Sophie; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Ponz, Aurelie et al

in Schweizer Archiv für Neurologie und Psychiatrie = Archives Suisses de Neurologie et de Psychiatrie = Archivio Svizzero di Neurologia e Psichiatria (2005), 156(8), 426-439

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See detailHuman cognition during REM sleep and the activity profile within frontal and parietal cortices: a reappraisal of functional neuroimaging data
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Ruby, P.; Maudoux, Audrey ULg et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2005), 150(Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology), 219-227

In this chapter, we aimed at further characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of the human rapid eye movement (REM) sleep at the population level. We carried out a meta-analysis of a large dataset of ... [more ▼]

In this chapter, we aimed at further characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of the human rapid eye movement (REM) sleep at the population level. We carried out a meta-analysis of a large dataset of positron emission tomography (PET) scans acquired during wakefulness, slow wave sleep and REM sleep, and focused especially on the brain areas in which the activity diminishes during REM sleep. Results show that quiescent regions are confined to the inferior and middle frontal cortex and to the inferior parietal lobule. Providing a plausible explanation for some of the features of dream reports, these findings may help in refining the concepts, which try to account for human cognition during REM sleep. In particular, we discuss the significance of these results to explain the alteration in executive processes, episodic memory retrieval and self representation during REM sleep dreaming as well as the incorporation of external stimuli into the dream narrative. [less ▲]

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See detailDreaming: a neuroimaging view
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Albouy, Geneviève ULg et al

in Schweizer Archiv Fur Neurologie und Psychiatrie (2005), 156

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See detailRegional organisation of brain activity during paradoxical sleep (PS)
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Ruby, P.; Schwartz, S. et al

in Archives Italiennes de Biologie (2004), 142(4), 413-419

Human brain function is regionally organised during paradoxical sleep (PS) in a very different way than during wakefulness or slow wave sleep. The important activity in the pons and in the limbic ... [more ▼]

Human brain function is regionally organised during paradoxical sleep (PS) in a very different way than during wakefulness or slow wave sleep. The important activity in the pons and in the limbic/paralimbic areas constitutes the key feature of the functional neuroanatomy of PS, together with a relative quiescence of prefrontal and parietal associative cortices. Two questions are still outstanding. What neurocognitive and neurophysiological mechanisms may explain this original organization of brain function during PS? How the pattern of regional brain function may relate to dream content? Although some clues are already available, the experimental answer to both questions is still pending. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory processing during sleep: mechanisms and evidence from neuroimaging studies
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Melchior, Gwenaelle; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Psychologica Belgica (2004), 44(1-2), 121-142

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See detailCerebral functional segregation and integration during human sleep
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Perrin, Fabien; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Luppi, Pierre-Herve (Ed.) Sleep: Circuits and Functions (2004)

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See detailMemory processing during human sleep as assessed by functional neuroimaging
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Revue Neurologique (2003, November), 159(11 Suppl), 27-29

Sleep is believed to participate in memory consolidation, possibly through off-line processing of recent memory traces. In this paper, we summarize functional neuroimaging data testing this hypothesis ... [more ▼]

Sleep is believed to participate in memory consolidation, possibly through off-line processing of recent memory traces. In this paper, we summarize functional neuroimaging data testing this hypothesis. First, sleep deprivation disrupts the processing of recent memory traces and hampers the changes in functional segregation and connectivity which underpin the gain in performance usually observed in subjects allowed to sleep on the first post-training night. Second, experience-dependent changes in regional brain activity occur during post-training sleep. These changes are shown to be related to the processing of high-level material and to be modulated by the amount of learning achieved during the training session. These changes do not involve isolated brain areas but entire macroscopic cerebral networks. These data suggest a role for sleep in the processing of recent memory traces. [less ▲]

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See detailOff-line processing of memory traces during human sleep: Contribution of functional neuroimaging
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Sleep & Biological Rhythms (2003), 1

Sleep is thought to participate in the consolidation of recent memory traces. We tested this hypothesis in humans by using functional neuroimaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron ... [more ▼]

Sleep is thought to participate in the consolidation of recent memory traces. We tested this hypothesis in humans by using functional neuroimaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography). First, following the training procedural visuo-motor learning task (pursuit task), total sleep deprivation on the first post-training night significantly deteriorates the gain in performance, which is usually observed after one complete night of sleep. In parallel, sleep deprivation hampers the changes in functional segregation and connectivity, which underpin the gain in performance usually observed in subjects allowed to sleep on the first post-training night. Second, following the training on an implicit memory task (probabilistic serial reaction time task), some brain areas are reactivated during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on the first post-training night. The reactivation was shown to be related to the processing of high-level material and to be modulated by the amount of learning achieved during the training session. These changes in activity do not involve isolated brain areas but entire macroscopic cortico-subcortical networks. Taken together, the results suggest an off-line processing of recent memory traces during sleep. [less ▲]

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See detailFestina lente: evidences for fast and slow learning processes and a role for sleep in human motor skill learning.
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg; Perrin, Fabien et al

in Learning & Memory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.) (2003), 10(4), 237-9

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See detailMemory processing during human sleep as assessed by functional neuroimaging.
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Revue Neurologique (2003), 159(11 Suppl), 627-9

Sleep is believed to participate in memory consolidation, possibly through off-line processing of recent memory traces. In this paper, we summarize functional neuroimaging data testing this hypothesis ... [more ▼]

Sleep is believed to participate in memory consolidation, possibly through off-line processing of recent memory traces. In this paper, we summarize functional neuroimaging data testing this hypothesis. First, sleep deprivation disrupts the processing of recent memory traces and hampers the changes in functional segregation and connectivity which underpin the gain in performance usually observed in subjects allowed to sleep on the first post-training night. Second, experience-dependent changes in regional brain activity occur during post-training sleep. These changes are shown to be related to the processing of high-level material and to be modulated by the amount of learning achieved during the training session. These changes do not involve isolated brain areas but entire macroscopic cerebral networks. These data suggest a role for sleep in the processing of recent memory traces. [less ▲]

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