References of "Dang Vu, Thien Thanh"
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See detailSleep : Implications for Theories of Dreaming and Consciousness
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel; Cologan, Victor et al

in Banks, William (Ed.) Encyclopaedia of Consciousness (2009)

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See detailSleep and Sleep States: PET activation patterns
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Squire, Larry (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Neuroscience (2009)

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See detailNeuroimaging in Sleep and Sleep Disorders
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schwartz, Sophie et al

in Chokroverty, Sudhansu (Ed.) Sleep Disorders Medicine (2009)

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See detailPET activation patterns
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Stickgold, Robert; Walker, Matthew (Eds.) The Neuroscience of Sleep (2009)

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See detailHomeostatic sleep pressure and responses to sustained attention in the suprachiasmatic area.
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in Science (2009), 324(5926), 516-9

Throughout the day, cognitive performance is under the combined influence of circadian processes and homeostatic sleep pressure. Some people perform best in the morning, whereas others are more alert in ... [more ▼]

Throughout the day, cognitive performance is under the combined influence of circadian processes and homeostatic sleep pressure. Some people perform best in the morning, whereas others are more alert in the evening. These chronotypes provide a unique way to study the effects of sleep-wake regulation on the cerebral mechanisms supporting cognition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in extreme chronotypes, we found that maintaining attention in the evening was associated with higher activity in evening than morning chronotypes in a region of the locus coeruleus and in a suprachiasmatic area (SCA) including the circadian master clock. Activity in the SCA decreased with increasing homeostatic sleep pressure. This result shows the direct influence of the homeostatic and circadian interaction on the neural activity underpinning human behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroimaging of narcolepsy
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Schwartz, Sophie et al

in CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets (2009), 8(4), 254-263

Neuroimaging techniques have refined the characterization of neural structures involved in the regulation of normal sleep-wake cycle in healthy humans. Yet brain imaging studies in patients with sleep ... [more ▼]

Neuroimaging techniques have refined the characterization of neural structures involved in the regulation of normal sleep-wake cycle in healthy humans. Yet brain imaging studies in patients with sleep disorders still remain scarce. In narcoleptic patients, structural and functional brain imaging studies have suggested the involvement of the hypothalamus in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy, plausibly consistent with an impairment of the hypocretin-orexin system. Some recent studies have further suggested that cataplexy, a key feature of the narcoleptic syndrome, might result from a dysfunction of the hypothalamus and its interactions with limbic structures. Other neuroimaging studies have focused on the assessment of neurotransmission and the effects of pharmacological treatment in narcoleptic patients. However, the neural correlates of some main symptoms of narcolepsy, such as sleep attacks, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations and sleep paralysis, are still unknown. In addition, the description of brain activity patterns during sleep in narcoleptic patients needs further investigation. Neuroimaging has proven to be a valuable tool for the study of sleep regulation and sleep disorders; its future developments will undoubtedly improve our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying narcolepsy with cataplexy. [less ▲]

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See detailIntrinsic brain activity in altered states of consciousness: how conscious is the default mode of brain function?
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Tshibanda, Luaba ULg et al

in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (2008), 1129

Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain-behavior relationships ... [more ▼]

Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain-behavior relationships has been challenged. That altered states of consciousness are a privileged way to study the relationships between spontaneous brain activity and behavior is proposed, and common resting-state brain activity features observed in various states of altered consciousness are reviewed. Early positron emission tomography studies showed that states of extremely low or high brain activity are often associated with unconsciousness. However, this relationship is not absolute, and the precise link between global brain metabolism and awareness remains yet difficult to assert. In contrast, voxel-based analyses identified a systematic impairment of associative frontoparieto-cingulate areas in altered states of consciousness, such as sleep, anesthesia, coma, vegetative state, epileptic loss of consciousness, and somnambulism. In parallel, recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have identified structured patterns of slow neuronal oscillations in the resting human brain. Similar coherent blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) systemwide patterns can also be found, in particular in the default-mode network, in several states of unconsciousness, such as coma, anesthesia, and slow-wave sleep. The latter results suggest that slow coherent spontaneous BOLD fluctuations cannot be exclusively a reflection of conscious mental activity, but may reflect default brain connectivity shaping brain areas of most likely interactions in a way that transcends levels of consciousness, and whose functional significance remains largely in the dark. [less ▲]

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See detailBoth the hippocampus and striatum are involved in consolidation of motor sequence memory.
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Neuron (2008), 58(2), 261-72

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the cerebral correlates of motor sequence memory consolidation. Participants were scanned while training on an implicit oculomotor ... [more ▼]

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the cerebral correlates of motor sequence memory consolidation. Participants were scanned while training on an implicit oculomotor sequence learning task and during a single testing session taking place 30 min, 5 hr, or 24 hr later. During training, responses observed in hippocampus and striatum were linearly related to the gain in performance observed overnight, but not over the day. Responses in both structures were significantly larger at 24 hr than at 30 min or 5 hr. Additionally, the competitive interaction observed between these structures during training became cooperative overnight. These results stress the importance of both hippocampus and striatum in procedural memory consolidation. Responses in these areas during training seem to condition the overnight memory processing that is associated with a change in their functional interactions. These results show that both structures interact during motor sequence consolidation to optimize subsequent behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroimaging insights into the pathophysiology of sleep disorders.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Sleep (2008), 31(6), 777-94

Neuroimaging methods can be used to investigate whether sleep disorders are associated with specific changes in brain structure or regional activity. However, it is still unclear how these new data might ... [more ▼]

Neuroimaging methods can be used to investigate whether sleep disorders are associated with specific changes in brain structure or regional activity. However, it is still unclear how these new data might improve our understanding of the pathophysiology underlying adult sleep disorders. Here we review functional brain imaging findings in major intrinsic sleep disorders (i.e., idiopathic insomnia, narcolepsy, and obstructive sleep apnea) and in abnormal motor behavior during sleep (i.e., periodic limb movement disorder and REM sleep behavior disorder). The studies reviewed include neuroanatomical assessments (voxel-based morphometry, magnetic resonance spectroscopy), metabolic/functional investigations (positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging), and ligand marker measurements. Based on the current state of the research, we suggest that brain imaging is a useful approach to assess the structural and functional correlates of sleep impairments as well as better understand the cerebral consequences of various therapeutic approaches. Modem neuroimaging techniques therefore provide a valuable tool to gain insight into possible pathophysiological mechanisms of sleep disorders in adult humans. [less ▲]

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See detailSpontaneous neural activity during human slow wave sleep.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2008), 105(39), 15160-5

Slow wave sleep (SWS) is associated with spontaneous brain oscillations that are thought to participate in sleep homeostasis and to support the processing of information related to the experiences of the ... [more ▼]

Slow wave sleep (SWS) is associated with spontaneous brain oscillations that are thought to participate in sleep homeostasis and to support the processing of information related to the experiences of the previous awake period. At the cellular level, during SWS, a slow oscillation (<1 Hz) synchronizes firing patterns in large neuronal populations and is reflected on electroencephalography (EEG) recordings as large-amplitude, low-frequency waves. By using simultaneous EEG and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterized the transient changes in brain activity consistently associated with slow waves (>140 microV) and delta waves (75-140 microV) during SWS in 14 non-sleep-deprived normal human volunteers. Significant increases in activity were associated with these waves in several cortical areas, including the inferior frontal, medial prefrontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate areas. Compared with baseline activity, slow waves are associated with significant activity in the parahippocampal gyrus, cerebellum, and brainstem, whereas delta waves are related to frontal responses. No decrease in activity was observed. This study demonstrates that SWS is not a state of brain quiescence, but rather is an active state during which brain activity is consistently synchronized to the slow oscillation in specific cerebral regions. The partial overlap between the response pattern related to SWS waves and the waking default mode network is consistent with the fascinating hypothesis that brain responses synchronized by the slow oscillation restore microwake-like activity patterns that facilitate neuronal interactions. [less ▲]

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See detailAn in computo investigation of the Landau-Kleffner syndrome.
Bonjean, Maxime ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg et al

in Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference (2007), 2007

We describe a computational model of the thalamus and the cortex able to reproduce some essential epileptiform features commonly observed in the Landau-Kleffner syndrome. Investigation with this realistic ... [more ▼]

We describe a computational model of the thalamus and the cortex able to reproduce some essential epileptiform features commonly observed in the Landau-Kleffner syndrome. Investigation with this realistic model leads us to the formulation of a cellular mechanism that could be responsible for the epileptic discharges occuring with this severe syndrome. Understanding this mechanism is of prime importance for developing new therapeutical strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep deprivation on the post-encoding night modifies the neural correlates of retrieval of emotional memories 6 months later
Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Darsaud, Annabelle et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2007), 27(Suppl. 1),

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See detailThe Role of Sleep in Motor Memory Consolidation assessed by fMRI and MEG
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Darsaud, Annabelle et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2007), 27(Suppl. 1),

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See detailSleep transforms the cerebral trace of declarative memories
Gais, Steffen; Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007), 104(47), 18778-18783

After encoding, memory traces are initially fragile and have to be reinforced to become permanent. The initial steps of this process occur at a cellular level within minutes or hours. Besides this rapid ... [more ▼]

After encoding, memory traces are initially fragile and have to be reinforced to become permanent. The initial steps of this process occur at a cellular level within minutes or hours. Besides this rapid synaptic consolidation, systems consolidation occurs within a time frame of days to years. For declarative memory, the latter is presumed to rely on an interaction between different brain regions, in particular the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Specifically, sleep has been proposed to provide a setting that supports such systems consolidation processes, leading to a transfer and perhaps transformation of memories. Using functional MRI, we show that postlearning sleep enhances hippocampal responses during recall of word pairs 48 h after learning, indicating intrahippocampal memory processing during sleep. At the same time, sleep induces a memory-related functional connectivity between the hippocampus and the mPFC. Six months after learning, memories activated the mPFC more strongly when they were encoded before sleep, showing that sleep leads to long-lasting changes in the representation of memories on a systems level. [less ▲]

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See detailPeriodic leg movements during sleep and wakefulness in narcolepsy.
Dauvilliers, Yves; Pennestri, Marie-Helene; Petit, Dominique ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2007), 16(3), 333-9

The objectives of the study were to measure the prevalence of periodic leg movements during NREM and REM sleep (PLMS) and while awake (PLMW) and to assess the impact of PLMS on nocturnal sleep and daytime ... [more ▼]

The objectives of the study were to measure the prevalence of periodic leg movements during NREM and REM sleep (PLMS) and while awake (PLMW) and to assess the impact of PLMS on nocturnal sleep and daytime functioning in patients with narcolepsy. One hundred and sixty-nine patients with narcolepsy and 116 normal controls matched for age and gender were included. Narcoleptics with high and low PLMS indices were compared to assess the impact of PLMS on sleep and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) variables. More narcoleptics than controls had a PLMS index greater than 5 per hour of sleep (67% versus 37%) and an index greater than 10 (53% versus 21%). PLMS indices were higher both in NREM and REM sleep in narcoleptic patients, but the between-group difference was greater for REM sleep. A significant increase of PLMS index was also found with aging in both narcoleptic patients and controls. PLMW indices were also significantly higher in narcoleptic patients. Patients with an elevated index of PLMS had a higher percentage of stage 1 sleep, a lower percentage of REM sleep, a lower REM efficiency and a shorter MSLT latency. The present study demonstrates a high frequency of PLMS and PLMW in narcolepsy, an association between the presence of PLMS and measures of REM sleep and daytime functioning disruption. These results suggest that PLMS represent an intrinsic feature of narcolepsy. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroimaging of REM sleep and dreaming
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in McNamara, Patrick; Barrett, Deirdre (Eds.) The New Science of Dreaming (2007)

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See detailHemodynamic cerebral correlates of sleep spindles during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Schabus, Manuel ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Albouy, Geneviève ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007), 104(32), 13164-9

In humans, some evidence suggests that there are two different types of spindles during sleep, which differ by their scalp topography and possibly some aspects of their regulation. To test for the ... [more ▼]

In humans, some evidence suggests that there are two different types of spindles during sleep, which differ by their scalp topography and possibly some aspects of their regulation. To test for the existence of two different spindle types, we characterized the activity associated with slow (11-13 Hz) and fast (13-15 Hz) spindles, identified as discrete events during non-rapid eye movement sleep, in non-sleep-deprived human volunteers, using simultaneous electroencephalography and functional MRI. An activation pattern common to both spindle types involved the thalami, paralimbic areas (anterior cingulate and insular cortices), and superior temporal gyri. No thalamic difference was detected in the direct comparison between slow and fast spindles although some thalamic areas were preferentially activated in relation to either spindle type. Beyond the common activation pattern, the increases in cortical activity differed significantly between the two spindle types. Slow spindles were associated with increased activity in the superior frontal gyrus. In contrast, fast spindles recruited a set of cortical regions involved in sensorimotor processing, as well as the mesial frontal cortex and hippocampus. The recruitment of partially segregated cortical networks for slow and fast spindles further supports the existence of two spindle types during human non-rapid eye movement sleep, with potentially different functional significance. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep-related hippocampo-cortical interplay during emotional memory recollection.
Sterpenich, Virginie ULg; Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in PLoS Biology (2007), 5(11), 282

Emotional events are usually better remembered than neutral ones. This effect is mediated in part by a modulation of the hippocampus by the amygdala. Sleep plays a role in the consolidation of declarative ... [more ▼]

Emotional events are usually better remembered than neutral ones. This effect is mediated in part by a modulation of the hippocampus by the amygdala. Sleep plays a role in the consolidation of declarative memory. We examined the impact of sleep and lack of sleep on the consolidation of emotional (negative and positive) memories at the macroscopic systems level. Using functional MRI (fMRI), we compared the neural correlates of successful recollection by humans of emotional and neutral stimuli, 72 h after encoding, with or without total sleep deprivation during the first post-encoding night. In contrast to recollection of neutral and positive stimuli, which was deteriorated by sleep deprivation, similar recollection levels were achieved for negative stimuli in both groups. Successful recollection of emotional stimuli elicited larger responses in the hippocampus and various cortical areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex, in the sleep group than in the sleep deprived group. This effect was consistent across subjects for negative items but depended linearly on individual memory performance for positive items. In addition, the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex were functionally more connected during recollection of either negative or positive than neutral items, and more so in sleeping than in sleep-deprived subjects. In the sleep-deprived group, recollection of negative items elicited larger responses in the amygdala and an occipital area than in the sleep group. In contrast, no such difference in brain responses between groups was associated with recollection of positive stimuli. The results suggest that the emotional significance of memories influences their sleep-dependent systems-level consolidation. The recruitment of hippocampo-neocortical networks during recollection is enhanced after sleep and is hindered by sleep deprivation. After sleep deprivation, recollection of negative, potentially dangerous, memories recruits an alternate amygdalo-cortical network, which would keep track of emotional information despite sleep deprivation. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroimaging in sleep medicine.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Petit, Dominique ULg et al

in Sleep Medicine (2007), 8(4), 349-72

The development of neuroimaging techniques has made possible the characterization of cerebral function throughout the sleep-wake cycle in normal human subjects. Indeed, human brain activity during sleep ... [more ▼]

The development of neuroimaging techniques has made possible the characterization of cerebral function throughout the sleep-wake cycle in normal human subjects. Indeed, human brain activity during sleep is segregated within specific cortical and subcortical areas in relation to the sleep stage, sleep physiological events and previous waking activity. This approach has allowed sleep physiological theories developed from animal data to be confirmed, but has also introduced original concepts about the neurobiological mechanisms of sleep, dreams and memory in humans. In contrast, at present, few neuroimaging studies have been dedicated to human sleep disorders. The available work has brought interesting data that describe some aspects of the pathophysiology and neural consequences of disorders such as insomnia, sleep apnea and narcolepsy. However, the interpretation of many of these results is restricted by limited sample size and spatial/temporal resolution of the employed technique. The use of neuroimaging in sleep medicine is actually restrained by concerns resulting from the technical experimental settings and the characteristics of the diseases. Nevertheless, we predict that future studies, conducted with state of the art techniques on larger numbers of patients, will be able to address these issues and contribute significantly to the understanding of the neural basis of sleep pathologies. This may finally offer the opportunity to use neuroimaging, in addition to the clinical and electrophysiological assessments, as a helpful tool in the diagnosis, classification, treatment and monitoring of sleep disorders in humans. [less ▲]

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