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See detailPositively Cooperative Binding of Zinc Ions to Bacillus cereus 569/H/9 beta-Lactamase II Suggests that the Binuclear Enzyme Is the Only Relevant Form for Catalysis
Jacquin, Olivier ULg; Balbeur, Dorothée ULg; Damblon, Christian ULg et al

in Journal of Molecular Biology (2009), 392(5), 1278-1291

Metallo-beta-lactamases catalyze the hydrolysis of most beta-lactam antibiotics and hence represent a major clinical concern. While enzymes belonging to subclass B1 have been shown to display maximum ... [more ▼]

Metallo-beta-lactamases catalyze the hydrolysis of most beta-lactam antibiotics and hence represent a major clinical concern. While enzymes belonging to subclass B1 have been shown to display maximum activity as dizinc species, the actual metal-to-protein stoichiometry and the affinity for zinc are not clear. We have further investigated the process of metal binding to the beta-lactamase H from Bacillus cereus 569/H/9 (known as BcII). Zinc binding was monitored using complementary biophysical techniques, including circular dichroism in the far-UV, enzymatic activity measurements, competition with a chromophoric chelator, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Most noticeably, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, together with catalytic activity measurements, demonstrate that two zinc ions bind cooperatively to the enzyme active site (with K-1/K-2 >= 5) and, hence, that catalysis is associated with the dizinc enzyme species only. Furthermore, competitive experiments with the chromophoric chelator Mag-Fura-2 indicates K-2 < 80 nM. This contrasts with cadmium binding, which is clearly a noncooperative process with the mono form being the only species significantly populated in the presence of 1 molar equivalent of Cd(II). Interestingly, optical measurements reveal that although the apo and dizinc species exhibit undistinguishable tertiary structural organizations, the metal-depleted enzyme shows a significant decrease in its alpha-helical content, presumably associated with enhanced flexibility. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPutative DNA G-quadruplex formation within the promoters of Plasmodium falciparum var genes
Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg; Gabelica, Valérie ULg; Damblon, Christian ULg et al

in BMC Genomics (2009), 10

Background. Guanine-rich nucleic acid sequences are capable of folding into an intramolecular four-stranded structure called a G-quadruplex. When found in gene promoter regions, G-quadruplexes can ... [more ▼]

Background. Guanine-rich nucleic acid sequences are capable of folding into an intramolecular four-stranded structure called a G-quadruplex. When found in gene promoter regions, G-quadruplexes can downregulate gene expression, possibly by blocking the transcriptional machinery. Here we have used a genome-wide bioinformatic approach to identify Putative G-Quadruplex Sequences (PQS) in the Plasmodium falciparum genome, along with biophysical techniques to examine the physiological stability of P. falciparum PQS in vitro. Results. We identified 63 PQS in the non-telomeric regions of the P. falciparum clone 3D7. Interestingly, 16 of these PQS occurred in the upstream region of a subset of the P. falciparum var genes (group B var genes). The var gene family encodes PfEMP1, the parasite’s major variant antigen and adhesin expressed at the surface of infected erythrocytes, that plays a key role in malaria pathogenesis and immune evasion. The ability of the PQS found in the upstream regions of group B var genes (UpsB-Q) to form stable Gquadruplex structures in vitro was confirmed using 1H NMR, circular dichroism, UV spectroscopy, and thermal denaturation experiments. Moreover, the synthetic compound BOQ1 that shows a higher affinity for DNA forming quadruplex rather than duplex structures was found to bind with high affinity to the UpsB-Q. Conclusions. This is the first demonstration of non-telomeric PQS in the genome of P. falciparum that form stable G-quadruplexes under physiological conditions in vitro. These results allow the generation of a novel hypothesis that the G-quadruplex sequences in the upstream regions of var genes have the potential to play a role in the transcriptional control of this major virulence-associated multi-gene family. [less ▲]

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See detailE. coli HU dimers dynamics studied by NMR
Augustyniak, R.; Damblon, Christian ULg; Castaing, B.

Poster (2008)

HU is a 2x90 residues, dimeric bacterial histone-like protein involved in chromosome compaction and other DNA-related processes. E. coli HU proteins are composed of three forms: two homodimers α2 and β2 ... [more ▼]

HU is a 2x90 residues, dimeric bacterial histone-like protein involved in chromosome compaction and other DNA-related processes. E. coli HU proteins are composed of three forms: two homodimers α2 and β2 (α and β sharing 70% of sequence identity) and one heterodimer (αβ). Dimeric forms relative abundance varies during cell growth and in response to environmental changes, suggesting that each dimer plays different physiological roles. Unlike other HU proteins which melt through a single step (N2<=>2D), E. coli dimers melt according to a two-step mechanism (N2<=>I2<=>2D). The native dimer, N2, melts partially into a dimeric intermediate, I2, which in turn yields the unfolded monomers, D. Circular Dichroism studies indicate that the intermediate, I2, corresponds to an HU dimer having partly lost its a-helices. Here we compared dynamic properties and structural features of E. Coli HU dimers at different temperatures in order to determine the secondary strutural elements still present in the I2 intermediate. Isotopically labelled proteins (15N, 13C) have been used to perform backbone assignment for all dimeric forms using sequential triple-resonance experiments. 15N-HSQC at different temperatures (288-323K) were recorded .Intensity variations and chemical shift perturbations allow the identification of the secondary element lost in the intermediate I2 confirming the high dynamics of arms responsible for protein-DNA interactions and the thermal stability of HTH motif in all dimeric forms. [less ▲]

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See detailStructural basis for the broad-spectrum inhibition of metallo-beta-lactamases by thiols
Lienard, Benoit M R; Garau, Gianpiero; Horsfall, Louise et al

in Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry (2008), 6(13), 2282-2294

The development of broad-spectrum metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) inhibitors is challenging due to structural diversity and differences in metal utilisation by these enzymes. Analysis of structural data ... [more ▼]

The development of broad-spectrum metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) inhibitors is challenging due to structural diversity and differences in metal utilisation by these enzymes. Analysis of structural data, followed by non-denturing mass spectrometric analyses, identified thiols proposed to inhibit representative MBLs from all three sub-classes: B1, B2 and B3. Solution analyses led to the identification of broad spectrum inhibitors, including potent inhibitors of the CphA MBL (Aeromonas hydrophila). Structural studies revealed that, as observed for other B1 and B3 MBLs, inhibition of the L1 MBL thiols involves metal chelation. Evidence is reported that this is not the case for inhibition of the CphA enzyme by some thiols; the crystal structure of the CphA-Zn-inhibitor complex reveals a binding mode in which the thiol does not interact with the zinc. The structural data enabled the design and the production of further more potent inhibitors. Overall the results suggest that the development of reasonably broad-spectrum MBL inhibitors should be possible. [less ▲]

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See detailA minimalistic approach to identify substrate binding features in B1 Metallo-beta-lactamases
Poeylaut-Palena, Andres A; Tomatis, Pablo E; Karsisiotis, Andreas I et al

in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2007), 17(18), 5171-5174

The 2-oxoazetidinylacetate sodium salt was synthesized as a model of a minimal P-lactam drug. This compound and the monobactam aztreonam were assayed as substrates of the Metallo-p-lactamase Bell. None of ... [more ▼]

The 2-oxoazetidinylacetate sodium salt was synthesized as a model of a minimal P-lactam drug. This compound and the monobactam aztreonam were assayed as substrates of the Metallo-p-lactamase Bell. None of them was hydrolyzed by the enzyme. While the azetidinone was not able to bind Bell, aztreonam was shown to bind in a nonproductive mode. These results provide an explanation for the unability of Metallo-beta-lactamases to inactive monobactams and give some clues for inhibitor design. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe activity of the dinuclear cobalt-beta-lactamase from Bacillus cereus in catalysing the hydrolysis of beta-lactams
Badarau, Adriana; Damblon, Christian ULg; Page, Michael I

in Biochemical Journal (2007), 401(Part 1), 197-203

Metallo-beta-lactamases are native zinc enzymes that catalyse the hydrolysis of beta-lactam antibiotics, but are also able to function with cobalt(II) and require one or two nnetal-ions for catalytic ... [more ▼]

Metallo-beta-lactamases are native zinc enzymes that catalyse the hydrolysis of beta-lactam antibiotics, but are also able to function with cobalt(II) and require one or two nnetal-ions for catalytic activity. The hydrolysis of cefoxitin, cephaloridine and benzylpenicillin catalysed by CoBcII (cobalt-substituted beta-lactamase from Bacillus cereus) has been studied at different pHs and metal-ion concentrations. An enzyme group of pK(a) 6.52 +/- 0.1 is found to be required in its deprotionated form for metal-ion binding and catalysis. The species that results from the loss of one cobalt ion from the enzyme has no significant catalytic activity and is thought to be the mononuclear CoBcII. It appears that dinuclear CoBcII is the active form of the enzyme necessary for turnover, while the mononuclear CoBcII is only involved in substrate binding. The cobalt-substituted enzyme is a more efficient catalyst than the native enzyme for the hydrolysis of some beta-lactam antibiotics suggesting that the role of the metal-ion is predominantly to provide the nucleophilic hydroxide, rather than to act as a Lewis acid to polarize the carbonyl group and stabilize the oxyanion tetrahedral intermediate. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibitors of metallo-beta-lactamase generated from beta-lactam antibiotics.
Badarau, Adriana; Llinas, Antonio; Laws, Andrew P et al

in Biochemistry (2005), 44(24), 8578-89

The resistance of bacteria to the normally lethal action of beta-lactam antibiotics is largely due to the production of beta-lactamases that catalyze the hydrolysis of the beta-lactam. One class of these ... [more ▼]

The resistance of bacteria to the normally lethal action of beta-lactam antibiotics is largely due to the production of beta-lactamases that catalyze the hydrolysis of the beta-lactam. One class of these enzymes is a zinc-dependent metallo-beta-lactamase for which there are no clinically available inhibitors. The hydrolysis of cephalosporin beta-lactam antibiotics generates dihydrothiazines which subsequently undergo isomerization at C6 by C-S bond cleavage and through the intermediacy of a thiol. These thiols can be trapped by the beta-lactamase from Bacillus cereus, causing inhibition of the enzyme. The rate of production of the thiol corresponds to the rate of inhibition, and the inhibition constants are in the micromolar range but vary with the nature of the cephalosporin derivative. NMR studies have identified the structure of the thiols causing inhibition and also show that the thiol binds to the zinc ion, which in turn perturbs the metal-bound histidines. Inhibition is slowly removed as the thiol becomes oxidized or undergoes further degradation. The thiol intermediate generated from cephalothin is a slow binding inhibitor. There is no observed inhibition from the analogous degradation products from penicillins. [less ▲]

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See detailSynthesis of a simplified bryostatin C-ring analogue that binds to the CRD2 of human PKC-alpha and construction of a novel BC-analogue by an unusual Julia olefination process
Hale, K. J.; Frigerio, M.; Manaviazar, S. et al

in Organic Letters (2003), 5(4), 499-502

[GRAPHICS] The synthesis of two truncated bryostatin analogues 2 and 3 is described. High-field NMR measurements on the C-ring analogue 3 in (CH3CN)-H-2 containing 25% (H2O)-H-2 have shown that it binds ... [more ▼]

[GRAPHICS] The synthesis of two truncated bryostatin analogues 2 and 3 is described. High-field NMR measurements on the C-ring analogue 3 in (CH3CN)-H-2 containing 25% (H2O)-H-2 have shown that it binds to the CRD2 of human PKC-alpha at virtually the same position as phorbol-13-acetate (PA) and bryostatin 1 (1). NMR titration studies have also revealed that 3 binds to the CRD2 with a potency similar in magnitude to PA but much less potently than 1. [less ▲]

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See detailThe inhibitor thiomandelic acid binds to both metal ions in metallo-beta-lactamase and induces positive cooperativity in metal binding.
Damblon, Christian ULg; Jensen, Mikael; Ababou, Abdessamad et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(31), 29240-51

Thiomandelic acid is a simple, broad spectrum, and reasonably potent inhibitor of metallo-beta-lactamases, enzymes that mediate resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. We report studies by NMR and ... [more ▼]

Thiomandelic acid is a simple, broad spectrum, and reasonably potent inhibitor of metallo-beta-lactamases, enzymes that mediate resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. We report studies by NMR and perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy of the mode of binding of the R and S enantiomers of thiomandelic acid, focusing on their interaction with the two metal ions in cadmium-substituted Bacillus cereus metallo-beta-lactamase. The 113Cd resonances are specifically assigned to the metals in the two individual sites on the protein by using 113Cd-edited 1H NMR spectra. Each enantiomer of thiomandelate produces large downfield shifts of both 113Cd resonances and changes in the PAC spectra, which indicate that they bind such that the thiol of the inhibitor bridges between the two metals. For R-thiomandelate, this is unambiguously confirmed by the observation of scalar coupling between Halpha of the inhibitor and both cadmium ions. The NMR and PAC spectra reveal that the two chiral forms of the inhibitor differ in the details of their coordination geometry. The complex with R-thiomandelate, but not that with the S-enantiomer, shows evidence in the PAC spectra of a dynamic process in the nanosecond time regime, the possible nature of which is discussed. The thiomandelate complex of the mononuclear enzyme can be detected only at low metal to enzyme stoichiometry; the relative populations of mononuclear and binuclear enzyme as a function of cadmium concentration provide clear evidence for positive cooperativity in metal ion binding in the presence of the inhibitor, in contrast to the negative cooperativity observed in the free enzyme. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamics of mononuclear cadmium beta-lactamase revealed by the combination of NMR and PAC spectroscopy.
Hemmingsen, L.; Damblon, Christian ULg; Antony, J. et al

in Journal of the American Chemical Society (2001), 123(42), 10329-35

The two metal sites in cadmium substituted beta-lactamase from Bacillus cereus 569/H/9 have been studied by NMR spectroscopy ((1)H, (15)N, and (113)Cd) and PAC spectroscopy ((111m)Cd). Distinct NMR ... [more ▼]

The two metal sites in cadmium substituted beta-lactamase from Bacillus cereus 569/H/9 have been studied by NMR spectroscopy ((1)H, (15)N, and (113)Cd) and PAC spectroscopy ((111m)Cd). Distinct NMR signals from the backbone amides are identified for the apoenzyme and the mononuclear and binuclear cadmium enzymes. For the binuclear cadmium enzyme, two (113)Cd NMR signals (142 and 262 ppm) and two (111m)Cd PAC nuclear quadrupole interactions are observed. Two nuclear quadrupole interactions are also observed, with approximately equal occupancy, in the PAC spectra at cadmium/enzyme ratios < 1; these are different from those derived for the binuclear cadmium enzyme, demonstrating interaction between the two metal ion binding sites. In contrast to the observation from PAC spectroscopy, only one (113)Cd NMR signal (176 ppm) is observed at cadmium/enzyme ratios < 1. The titration of the metal site imidazole (N)H proton signals as a function of cadmium ion-to-enzyme ratio shows that signals characteristic for the binuclear cadmium enzyme appear when the cadmium ion-to-enzyme ratio is between 1 and 2, whereas no signals are observed at stoichiometries less than 1. The simplest explanation consistent with all data is that, at cadmium/enzyme ratios < 1, the single Cd(II) is undergoing exchange between the two metal sites on the enzyme. This exchange must be fast on the (113)Cd NMR time scale and slow on the (111m)Cd PAC time scale and must thus occur in a time regime between 0.1 and 10 micros. [less ▲]

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See detailThiomandelic acid, a broad spectrum inhibitor of zinc beta-lactamases: kinetic and spectroscopic studies.
Mollard, C.; Moali, C.; Papamicael, C. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2001), 276(48), 45015-23

Resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics mediated by metallo-beta-lactamases is an increasingly worrying clinical problem. Candidate inhibitors include mercaptocarboxylic acids, and we report studies of a ... [more ▼]

Resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics mediated by metallo-beta-lactamases is an increasingly worrying clinical problem. Candidate inhibitors include mercaptocarboxylic acids, and we report studies of a simple such compound, thiomandelic acid. A series of 35 analogues were synthesized and examined as metallo-beta-lactamase inhibitors. The K(i) values (Bacillus cereus enzyme) are 0.09 microm for R-thiomandelic acid and 1.28 microm for the S-isomer. Structure-activity relationships show that the thiol is essential for activity and the carboxylate increases potency; the affinity is greatest when these groups are close together. Thioesters of thiomandelic acid are substrates for the enzyme, liberating thiomandelic acid, suggesting a starting point for the design of "pro-drugs." Importantly, thiomandelic acid is a broad spectrum inhibitor of metallo-beta-lactamases, with a submicromolar K(i) value for all nine enzymes tested, except the Aeromonas hydrophila enzyme; such a wide spectrum of activity is unprecedented. The binding of thiomandelic acid to the B. cereus enzyme was studied by NMR; the results are consistent with the idea that the inhibitor thiol binds to both zinc ions, while its carboxylate binds to Arg(91). Amide chemical shift perturbations for residues 30-40 (the beta(3)-beta(4) loop) suggest that this small inhibitor induces a movement of this loop of the kind seen for other larger inhibitors. [less ▲]

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See detailDNA-binding mechanism of the Escherichia coli Ada O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase.
Verdemato, P. E.; Brannigan, J. A.; Damblon, Christian ULg et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (2000), 28(19), 3710-8

The C-terminal domain of the Escherichia coli Ada protein (Ada-C) aids in the maintenance of genomic integrity by efficiently repairing pre-mutagenic O:(6)-alkylguanine lesions in DNA. Structural and ... [more ▼]

The C-terminal domain of the Escherichia coli Ada protein (Ada-C) aids in the maintenance of genomic integrity by efficiently repairing pre-mutagenic O:(6)-alkylguanine lesions in DNA. Structural and thermodynamic studies were carried out to obtain a model of the DNA-binding process. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies map the DNA-binding site to helix 5, and a loop region (residues 151-160) which form the recognition helix and the 'wing' of a helix-turn-wing motif, respectively. The NMR data also suggest the absence of a large conformational change in the protein upon binding to DNA. Hence, an O:(6)-methylguanine (O:(6)meG) lesion would be inaccessible to active site nucleophile Cys146 if the modified base remained stacked within the DNA duplex. The experimentally determined DNA-binding face of Ada-C was used in combination with homology modelling, based on the catabolite activator protein, and the accepted base-flipping mechanism, to construct a model of how Ada-C binds to DNA in a productive manner. To complement the structural studies, thermodynamic data were obtained which demonstrate that binding to unmethylated DNA was entropically driven, whilst the demethylation reaction provoked an exothermic heat change. Methylation of Cys146 leads to a loss of structural integrity of the DNA-binding subdomain. [less ▲]

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See detailH-1-N-15 HMQC for the identification of metal-bound histidines in Cd-113-substituted Bacillus cereus zinc beta-lactamase
Damblon, Christian ULg; Prosperi, Christelle ULg; Lian, L. Y. et al

in Journal of the American Chemical Society (1999), 121(49), 11575-11576

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See detailThe catalytic mechanism of beta-lactamases: NMR titration of an active-site lysine residue of the TEM-1 enzyme.
Damblon, Christian ULg; Raquet, X.; Lian, L. Y. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1996), 93(5), 1747-52

Beta-Lactamases are widespread in the bacterial world, where they are responsible for resistance to penicillins, cephalosporins, and related compounds, currently the most widely used antibacterial agents ... [more ▼]

Beta-Lactamases are widespread in the bacterial world, where they are responsible for resistance to penicillins, cephalosporins, and related compounds, currently the most widely used antibacterial agents. Detailed structural and mechanistic understanding of these enzymes can be expected to guide the design of new antibacterial compounds resistant to their action. A number of high-resolution structures are available for class A beta-lactamases, whose catalytic mechanism involves the acylation of a serine residue at the active site. The identity of the general base which participates in the activation of this serine residue during catalysis has been the subject of controversy, both a lysine residue and a glutamic acid residue having been proposed as candidates for this role. We have used the pH dependence of chemical modification of epsilon-amino groups by 2,4,6,-trinitrobenzenesulfonate and the pH dependence of the epsilon-methylene 1H and 13C chemical shifts (in enzyme selectively labeled with [epsilon-13C]lysine) to estimate the pKa of the relevant lysine residue, lysine-73, of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. Both methods show that the pKa of this residue is > 10, making it very unlikely that this residue could act as a proton acceptor in catalysis. An alternative mechanism in which this role is performed by glutamate-166 through an intervening water molecule is described. [less ▲]

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See detailStreptomyces K15 active-site serine DD-transpeptidase: specificity profile for peptide, thiol ester and ester carbonyl donors and pathways of the transfer reactions.
Grandchamps, Jacqueline; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine ULg; Damblon, Christian ULg et al

in Biochemical Journal (1995), 307(Pt 2), 335-339

The Streptomyces K15 transferase is a penicillin-binding protein presumed to be involved in bacterial wall peptidoglycan crosslinking. It catalyses cleavage of the peptide, thiol ester or ester bond of ... [more ▼]

The Streptomyces K15 transferase is a penicillin-binding protein presumed to be involved in bacterial wall peptidoglycan crosslinking. It catalyses cleavage of the peptide, thiol ester or ester bond of carbonyl donors Z-R1-CONH-CHR2-COX-CHR3-COO- (where X is NH, S or O) and transfers the electrophilic group Z-R1-CONH-CHR2-CO to amino acceptors via an acyl-enzyme intermediate. Kinetic data suggest that the amino acceptor behaves as a simple alternative nucleophile at the level of the acyl-enzyme in the case of thiol ester and ester donors, and that it binds to the enzyme.carbonyl donor Michaelis complex and influences the rate of enzyme acylation by the carbonyl donor in the case of amide donors. Depending on the nature of the scissile bond, the enzyme has different requirements for substituents at positions R1, R2 and R3. [less ▲]

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See detailThiolester substrates of DD-peptidases and beta-lactamases
Damblon, Christian ULg; Ledent, P.; Zhao, G. H. et al

in Letters In Peptide Science (1995), 2(3-4), 212-216

With peptide substrates, the penicillin-sensitive DD-peptidases exhibit a strict specificity for D-Ala-D-Xaa C-termini. Only glycine is tolerated as the C-terminal residue, but with a significantly ... [more ▼]

With peptide substrates, the penicillin-sensitive DD-peptidases exhibit a strict specificity for D-Ala-D-Xaa C-termini. Only glycine is tolerated as the C-terminal residue, but with a significantly decreased activity. These enzymes also hydrolyse various ester and thiolester analogues of their natural substrates. Some of the thiolesters whose C-terminal leaving group exhibited an L stereochemistry were significantly hydrolysed by some of the studied enzymes, particularly by the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase. By contrast, the strict specificity for a D residue in the penultimate position was fully retained. The same esters and thiolesters also behaved as substrates for beta-lactamases. In this case, thiolesters exhibiting L stereochemistry in the C-terminal position could also be hydrolysed, mainly by the class C and class D enzymes. But, more surprisingly, the class C Enterobacter cloacae P99 beta-lactamase also hydrolysed thiolesters containing an L residue in the penultimate position, sometimes more efficiently than the D isomer. [less ▲]

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See detailBreakdown of the stereospecificity of DD-peptidases and beta-lactamases with thiolester substrates.
Damblon, Christian ULg; Zhao, G. H.; Jamin, M. et al

in Biochemical Journal (1995), 309 ( Pt 2)

With peptide analogues of their natural substrates (the glycopeptide units of nascent peptidoglycan), the DD-peptidases exhibit a strict preference for D-Ala-D-Xaa C-termini. Gly is tolerated as the C ... [more ▼]

With peptide analogues of their natural substrates (the glycopeptide units of nascent peptidoglycan), the DD-peptidases exhibit a strict preference for D-Ala-D-Xaa C-termini. Gly is tolerated as the C-terminal residue, but with a significantly decreased activity. These enzymes were also known to hydrolyse various ester and thiolester analogues of their natural substrates. Some thiolesters with a C-terminal leaving group that exhibited L stereochemistry were significantly hydrolysed by some of the enzymes, particularly the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase, but the strict specificity for a D residue in the penultimate position was fully retained. These esters and thiolesters also behave as substrates for beta-lactamases. In this case, thiolesters exhibiting L stereochemistry in the ultimate position could also be hydrolysed, mainly by the class-C and class-D enzymes. However, more surprisingly, the class-C Enterobacter cloacae P99 beta-lactamase also hydrolysed thiolesters containing an L residue in the penultimate position, sometimes with a higher efficiency than the D isomer. [less ▲]

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See detailSynthesis, purification and kinetic properties of fluorescein-labelled penicillins
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Damblon, Christian ULg; Jamin, Marc et al

in Biochemical Journal (1994), 300

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See detailDirect n.m.r. evidence for substrate-induced conformational changes in a beta-lactamase.
Jamin, M.; Damblon, Christian ULg; Bauduin-Misselyn, A. M. et al

in Biochemical Journal (1994), 301 ( Pt 1)

Cefoxitin and other beta-lactam antibiotics with a methoxy group on the alpha-face behave as very poor substrates of the Bacillus licheniformis beta-lactamase. The kinetic properties of the enzyme ... [more ▼]

Cefoxitin and other beta-lactam antibiotics with a methoxy group on the alpha-face behave as very poor substrates of the Bacillus licheniformis beta-lactamase. The kinetic properties of the enzyme-cefoxitin system made it theoretically suitable for a detailed structural study of the acyl-enzyme. Unfortunately, soaking the crystals in cefoxitin solution did not allow detection of a crystalline acyl-enzyme complex. In contrast, direct observation by n.m.r. of the stable acyl-enzyme formed with cefoxitin and moxalactam indicated clear modifications of the enzyme structure, which were reflected in the aromatic and high-field methyl regions of the spectrum. The return to the initial free enzyme spectrum was concomitant with the hydrolysis of the acyl-enzyme, the process being slow enough to allow multidimensional n.m.r. experiments. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Mechanism of Action of DD-Peptidases: The Role of Tyrosine-159 in the Streptomyces R61 DD-Peptidase
Wilkin, Jean-Marc; Jamin, Marc; Damblon, Christian ULg et al

in Biochemical Journal (1993), 291(Part 2), 537-544

Tyrosine-159 of the Streptomyces R61 penicillin-sensitive DD-peptidase was replaced by serine or phenylalanine. The second mutation yielded a very poorly active protein whose rate of penicillin binding ... [more ▼]

Tyrosine-159 of the Streptomyces R61 penicillin-sensitive DD-peptidase was replaced by serine or phenylalanine. The second mutation yielded a very poorly active protein whose rate of penicillin binding was also drastically decreased, except for the reactions with nitrocefin and methicillin. The consequences of the first mutation were more surprising, since a large proportion of the thiolesterase activity was retained, together with the penicillin-binding capacity. Conversely, the peptidase properties was severely affected. In both cases, a drastic decrease in the transferase activity was observed. The results are compared with those obtained by mutation of the corresponding residue in the class A beta-lactamase of Streptomyces albus G. [less ▲]

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