References of "DETRY, Olivier"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailScarless cholecystectomy: laparoscopic surgery by unique umbilical incision
Kohnen, Laurent ULg; Coimbra Marques, Carla ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2010), 65(10), 543-4

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImplantation d'une unité de chirurgie abdominale laparoscopique aux Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa - Rapport d'activité 2010 - Rapport final 2008-2010
Detry, Olivier ULg

Report (2010)

Rapport 2010 du projet visant à implanter une unité de chirurgie laparoscopique au sein des Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa (CUK), projet de coopération entre l’Université de Kinshasa (UNIKIN) et ... [more ▼]

Rapport 2010 du projet visant à implanter une unité de chirurgie laparoscopique au sein des Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa (CUK), projet de coopération entre l’Université de Kinshasa (UNIKIN) et l’Université de Liège (ULg), par le service de chirurgie abdominale (Pr Michel Meurisse) du CHU de Liège. Ce projet a été choisi et financé à hauteur de 100.000 euros sur 3 ans (2008 - 2010) par Wallonie-Bruxelles International (WBI) et la Région Wallonne. Il a également bénéficié de l’apport des CUK pour la mise à disposition des locaux et du personnel soignant, et du CHU de Liège par sa mise à disposition du personnel soignant, et par le don de matériel médical (18 lits de soins intensifs, 1 colonne de laparoscopie, 1 amplificateur de brillance, 2 respirateurs, 2 monitorings d’anesthésie, et divers petits matériels médicaux). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (32 ULg)
Full Text
See detailApproche laparoscopique en chirurgie abdominale
Detry, Olivier ULg

Scientific conference (2009, December 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe pneumopéritoine aggrave l'ischémie hépatique lors du clampage hilaire dans un modèle porcin
Nsadi, Berthier; Gilson, Nathalie; Pire, E. et al

in Journal de Chirurgie (2009, December), 146

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (21 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail14 steps to writing clearly
Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Ceelen, W.; Detry, Olivier ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2009), 109

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIMPLANTATION D’UNE UNITE DE CHIRURGIE ABDOMINALE LAPAROSCOPIQUE AUX CLINIQUES UNIVERSITAIRES DE KINSHASA (CUK)
Detry, Olivier ULg

Report (2009)

Rapport d’une première mission de formation des techniques spécialisées de chirurgie, d’anesthésie et de nursing spécifiques à la chirurgie laparoscopique, et démarrage du programme de chirurgie ... [more ▼]

Rapport d’une première mission de formation des techniques spécialisées de chirurgie, d’anesthésie et de nursing spécifiques à la chirurgie laparoscopique, et démarrage du programme de chirurgie laparoscopique aux CUK Séjour du 8 au 18 décembre 2009 d’une équipe multidisciplinaire du CHU de Liège, Université de Liège, Belgique, au sein des CUK, Université de Kinshasa, RDC [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 209 (42 ULg)
See detailLe ciblage therapeutique: vers une guerre propre et efficace contre le cancer
Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Waltregny, David ULg; Detry, Olivier ULg et al

Scientific conference (2009, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 128 (17 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLa transplantation, et pourquoi le don d'organes?
Detry, Olivier ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffect of the transversus abdominis plane block on pain after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair
Adedjoumo, Moibi; Amabili, P.; Detry, Olivier ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2009, September 19), 60(3), 205

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation (LT) from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors: Multicenter Belgian experience 2003-2007
Detry, Olivier ULg; Donckier, Vincent; Lucidi, Valerio et al

in Transplant International (2009, August), 22(S2), 62-234

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplantation from controlled donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors: a single center experience
Detry, Olivier ULg; Veys, Caroline; Seydel, Benoît ULg et al

in Liver Transplantation (2009, July), 15(7), 180-181

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL’étude du mois. Traitement de l’hépatocarcinome au stade palliatif par Sorafenib (Nexavar) :Résultats de l’étude SHARP (Sorafenib Hepatocarcinoma Assessment Randomized Protocol)
Detry, Olivier ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg; Deroover, Arnaud ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2009), 64(3), 168-170

Curative management of early-stage hepatocarcinoma may include partial hepatic resection, liver transplantation or tumoral necrosis using radiofrequency ablation or alcoholisation. Until recently, no ... [more ▼]

Curative management of early-stage hepatocarcinoma may include partial hepatic resection, liver transplantation or tumoral necrosis using radiofrequency ablation or alcoholisation. Until recently, no efficient therapeutic mean was available for advanced hepatocarcinoma. Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that decreases tumoral proliferation and angiogenesis, and increases apoptosis in many cancer models. The results of a phase 3 randomized, multicentric, study, entitled SHARP, have now demonstrated that Sorafenib increases survival in patients with advanced hepatocarcinoma developed in Child A cirrhosis. Mean survival gain was a little less than 3 months, without any radiologic response or improvement in the delay before symptomatic progression of the disease. The monthly cost of Sorafenib is a little more than 5,000 euros. It is now crucial to evaluate the potential role of Sorafenib in adjuvant therapy after liver resection or radiofrequency ablation of hepatocarcinoma. The CHU of Liège is taking part to a randomized, multicentric study evaluating the use of Sorafenib after liver resection or radiofrequency ablation for hepatocarcinoma. Another future evaluation could be the association of Sorafenib with other antitumoral agents. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 376 (37 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOrgan Procurement After Euthanasia: Belgian Experience
Ysebaert, dirk; Van Beeumen, G.; De Greef, K. et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2009), 41

Euthanasia was legalized in Belgium in 2002 for adults under strict conditions. The patient must be in a medically futile condition and of constant and unbearable physical or mental suffering that cannot ... [more ▼]

Euthanasia was legalized in Belgium in 2002 for adults under strict conditions. The patient must be in a medically futile condition and of constant and unbearable physical or mental suffering that cannot be alleviated, resulting from a serious and incurable disorder caused by illness or accident. Between 2005 and 2007, 4 patients (3 in Antwerp and 1 in Liège) expressed their will for organ donation after their request for euthanasia was granted. Patients were aged 43 to 50 years and had a debilitating neurologic disease, either after severe cerebrovascular accident or primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Ethical boards requested complete written scenario with informed consent of donor and relatives, clear separation between euthanasia and organ procurement procedure, and all procedures to be performed by senior staff members and nursing staff on a voluntary basis. The euthanasia procedure was performed by three independent physicians in the operating room. After clinical diagnosis of cardiac death, organ procurement was performed by femoral vessel cannulation or quick laparotomy. In 2 patients, the liver, both kidneys, and pancreatic islets (one case) were procured and transplanted; in the other 2 patients, there was additional lung procurement and transplantation. Transplant centers were informed of the nature of the case and the elements of organ procurement. There was primary function of all organs. The involved physicians and transplant teams had the well-discussed opinion that this strong request for organ donation after euthanasia could not be waived. A clear separation between the euthanasia request, the euthanasia procedure, and the organ procurement procedure is necessary. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 169 (29 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBelgium and organ donation: a further increase in organ donation in 2007! Preface to the 15(th) Annual Meeting of the Belgian Transplantation Society.
Detry, Olivier ULg; Donckier, Vincent

in Transplantation Proceedings (2009), 41(2), 565

In 2007, the Belgian annual rate of effective cadaveric organ donors further increased to 28.1 per million inhabitants, up from 26.2% in 2006 (http://www.transplant.be/donor/TxCoord.pdf). In numbers, 541 ... [more ▼]

In 2007, the Belgian annual rate of effective cadaveric organ donors further increased to 28.1 per million inhabitants, up from 26.2% in 2006 (http://www.transplant.be/donor/TxCoord.pdf). In numbers, 541 potential cadaveric organ donors were referred to the different transplant centers, resulting in 291 effective organ donors. The main reason for no organ retrieval was medical contraindications (34% of the total referrals). Family refusals dropped to less than 13%. Mean organ yielding was 3.55 per donation after brain death (DBD) donors and 2.28 per donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors, allowing a retrieval of 97.82 transplantable organs per million inhabitants, one of the highest so far to the best of our knowledge. This high rate of organ donation is certainly linked to the opting-out (or presumed consent) Belgian transplantation law, to the high motivation of the different Belgian transplant programs and intensive care units, to the confidence of the Belgian population in the Belgian medicine, and to the federal and regional political incentives to organ donation, as the Beldonor or the GIFT projects. This high rate of donation, in addition to active programs of living donation in kidney and liver transplantation and to MELD allocation, allowed to a significant decrease in the number of patients on the liver and kidney waiting lists( -34% and -18% in two years, respectively). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTraitement des carcinomes hépatocellulaires à un stade avancé
Van Daele, Daniel ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2009), 64(3), 140-147

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the main primitive tumor of the liver. It occurs in the setting of liver cirrhosis in more than 90% of the cases in developping countries. The prognosis depends on the size ... [more ▼]

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the main primitive tumor of the liver. It occurs in the setting of liver cirrhosis in more than 90% of the cases in developping countries. The prognosis depends on the size, number and extension of the tumor as well as on the severity of the underlying liver disease. The Barcelona Clinic Classification takes into account these different parameters and helps the clinician in the therapeutic decision. Some patients (around 25%) are amenable to therapy with a curative intent (liver transplantation, resection, destruction by radiofrequency). In patients with hepatocellular carcinoma at an intermediate stage, lipiodolized chemoembolization gives a survival advantage in comparison with placebo. No conventional regimen of chemotherapy has a proven survival benefit. In patients with a hepatocellular carcinoma at an advanced stage, sorafenib, an oral multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the first coumpound to demonstrate a significant effect on survival free of disease progression in a selected group of patients. Its toxicity profile is particularly favourable. Combination of surgical and medical therapies should be properly evaluated in clinical trials in the near future. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 230 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplant donation after cardiac death : experience at the University of Liège
Detry, Olivier ULg; Seydel, Benoît ULg; Delbouille, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2009), 41(2), 582-4

Aim: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has been proposed to partly overcome the organ donor shortage. In liver transplantation, the additional warm ischemia linked to DCD procurement may promote higher ... [more ▼]

Aim: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has been proposed to partly overcome the organ donor shortage. In liver transplantation, the additional warm ischemia linked to DCD procurement may promote higher rate of primary non-function and ischemic type biliary lesions. In this study we reviewed the results of DCD liver transplantation at the University of Liège. Patients and Methods: From 2003 to 2007, 13 controlled DCD liver transplantations were consecutively performed. The records of all donors and recipients were retrospectively reviewed, particularly evaluating the outcome and the occurrence of biliary complications. Mean follow-up was 25 months. Results: Mean donor age was 51 years and their mean intensive care stay was 5.4 days. Mean time between ventilation arrest and cardiac arrest was 9.3 min. Mean time between cardiac arrest and arterial flush was 7.7 min. No touch period was 2 to 5 min. Mean graft cold ischemia was 295 min and mean suture warm ischemia was 38 min. Postoperatively there was no primary non-function. Mean peak transaminase was 2,546 UI/ml. Patient and graft survival was 100% at one year. Two patients (15%) developed graft main bile duct stenosis and underwent endoscopic management. No patient developed symptomatic intrahepatic bile duct strictures or needed retransplantation in the follow-up. Conclusions: The experience of the transplantation department of the University of Liege confirms that controlled DCD donors may be a valuable source of transplantable liver grafts, in case of short procurement warm ischemia and short transplant cold ischemia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 141 (22 ULg)