References of "DE ROOVER, Arnaud"
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See detailDelayed graft function does not harm the future of donation-after- cardiac-death kidney transplants
LeDinh, H; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2012, March 29)

Introduction: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of DGF on post-transplant outcomes in controlled DCD kidney grafts. Patients and Methods: This single-center retrospective study recruited 80 controlled DCD kidney allo- grafts which have been performed at the University Hospital of Sart Tilman, University of Liège, from Jan 2005 to Dec 2011. Results: Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. No primary non-function grafts were encountered. DGF rate was 36%. Overall graft survivals between groups with and without DGF were 92.4% and 95.1% at 1 year, 92.4% and 91.7% at 3 years, and 84.7% and 91.7% at 5 years (p=ns), respectively. Patients with and without DGF had the same survival rates at the corresponding time points (92.4% and 97.1%, 92.4% and 93.7%, and 84.7% and 93.7%, p=ns, respectively). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was significantly lower in DGF group compared to non-DGF group at hospital discharge (29 vs 42 ml/min, p=0.001) and up to 1 year post-transplant (46 vs 53 ml/min, p=0.045), but the differ- ence disappeared afterwards (50 vs 48 ml/min at 3 years, and 54 vs 53 ml/min at 5 years, p=ns). DGF did not increase the risk of acute rejection or surgical complications. 29.6% of recipients with DGF de- veloped acute rejection (biopsy-proven rejection and clinically suspected rejection) compared with 29.2% of recipients without DGF (p=ns). The rate of all surgical complications was 33.3% and 25% in recipients with and without DGF (p=ns). However, DGF prolonged significantly the length of hospitaliza- tion in DGF than non-DGF group (18.9 vs 13 days, p=0.000). Donor BMI 􏰤 30 kg/m2􏰁􏰀􏰚􏰌􏰈􏰏􏰥􏰏􏰌􏰝􏰣􏰀􏰕􏰉􏰂􏰀􏰤 30 kg/m2 and pre-transplant dialysis duration increased the risk of DGF in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: Apart from longer hospital stay, DGF had no deleterious impact on the future of DCD kidney allografts. Comparable graft and patient survival, renal function, rejection rate and surgical com- plications were observed between groups with and without DGF. [less ▲]

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See detailResults of kidney transplantation from controlled donors after cardio-circulatory death: a single center experience.
Ledinh, H.; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Transplant International (2012), 25

The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post-transplant complications. The influence of delayed graft function (DGF) on graft survival and DGF risk factors were analyzed as secondary end-points. This is a retrospective mono-center review of a consecutive series of 59 DCD-KT performed between 2005 and 2010. Overall graft survival was 96.6%, 94.6%, and 90.7% at 3 months, 1 and 3 years, respectively. Main cause of graft loss was patient's death with a functioning graft. No primary nonfunction grafts. Renal graft function was suboptimal at hospital discharge, but nearly normalized at 3 months. DGF was observed in 45.6% of all DCD-KT. DGF significantly increased postoperative length of hospitalization, but had no deleterious impact on graft function or survival. Donor body mass index >/=30 was the only donor factor that was found to significantly increase the risk of DGF (P < 0.05). Despite a higher rate of DGF, controlled DCD-KT offers a valuable contribution to the pool of deceased donor kidney grafts, with comparable mid-term results to those procured after brain death. [less ▲]

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See detailEvolution of Native Kidney Function After Pancreas Transplantation Alone
LE DINH, Hieu; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; COIMBRA MARQUES, Carla ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2012), 44

Introduction. This study investigated changes in kidney function over time among a cohort of patients undergoing pancreas transplantation alone (PTA) from January 2002 to December 2011. Patients and ... [more ▼]

Introduction. This study investigated changes in kidney function over time among a cohort of patients undergoing pancreas transplantation alone (PTA) from January 2002 to December 2011. Patients and Methods. Ten of eighteen PTA patients bearing functioning grafts for at least 1 year were recruited for the analysis. Primary endpoints were changes in mean serum creatinine (SCr, mg/L) and mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the 4-variable Levey-MDRD equation (mL/min/1.73 m2) comparing baseline (pretransplantation) to 6-month, 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year posttransplantation values. Mean follow-up time was 75.7 20.5 months (range, 46–106.5). Results. Baseline eGFR was 89.3 27.9 (range, 58–145). eGFR decreased to 75.7 26.2, 71 20.6, 66.5 14.8, and 62.1 11.2 at 6 months, 1, 3, and 5 years representing 15.2%, 20.5%, 15.8%, and 22.6% percentage decreases respectively (P .05 for all pairwise comparisons). The Baseline SCr was 8.6 2.3 mg/L (range, 5–13). SCr progressively increased to 10.1 3, 10.5 3.1, 10.9 3.1, and 11.3 1.7 at 6 months, 1, 3, and 5 years a 17.1%, 22%, 16.6%, and 19.9% increase respectively (P .05 for all pairwise comparisons). One of ten, 2/8, and 3/7 patients displayed an eGFR 60 at transplantation versus 3 and 5 years thereafter, respectively. No patient developed a SCr 25 mg/L or eGFR 30 or needed dialysis or kidney transplantation. Five of ten patients had micro-albuminuria or proteinuria before transplantation. Tacrolimus levels were within recommended therapeutic ranges over time. Conclusion. Kidney function deteriorated significantly after PTA. Understanding of risk factors for the development of renal impairment is important to preserve kidney function and to select appropriate candidates for PTA. [less ▲]

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See detailDelayed graft function does not harm the future of donation-after-cardiac death in kidney transplantation.
Le Dinh, Hieu; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2012), 44(9), 2795-802

INTRODUCTION: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of DGF on posttransplantation outcomes among grafts from controlled DCD kidneys. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This single-center retrospective study recruited 80 controlled DCD kidneys transplanted from January 2005 to December 2011. Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. RESULTS: There were no primary nonfunction grafts; the DGF rate was 35.5%. Overall graft survival rates between groups with versus without DGF were 92.4% and 95.2% at 1 year, 92.4% and 87.1% at 3 years, and 84.7% and 87.1% at 5 years, respectively (P = not significant (NS)). Patients with versus without DGF showed the same survival rates at the corresponding time 92.4% vs 97.2%, 92.4% vs 93.9%, and 84.7% vs 93.9% (P = NS). Estimated glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the DGF compared with the non-DGF group at hospital discharge (29 vs 42 mL/min; P = .00) and at 6 months posttransplantation (46 vs 52 mL/min; P = .04), but the difference disappeared thereafter: 47 vs 52 mL/min at 1 year, 50 vs 48 mL/min at 3 years, and 54 vs 53 mL/min at 5 years (P = NS). DGF did not increase the risk of an acute rejection episode (29.6% vs 30.6%; P = NS) or rate of surgical complications (33.3% vs 26.5%; P = NS). However, DGF prolonged significantly the length of hospitalization in the DGF versus the non- DGF group (18.9 vs 13 days; P = .00). Donor body mass index (BMI) >/= 30 kg/m(2), recipient BMI >/=30 kg/m(2), and pretransplantation dialysis duration increased the risk of DGF upon multivariate logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Apart from the longer hospital stay, DGF had no deleterious impact on the future of kidney allografts from controlled DCD, which showed comparable graft and patient survivals, renal function, rejection rates, and surgical complications as a group without DGF. Therefore, DGF should no longer be considered to be a medical barrier to the use of kidney grafts from controlled DCD. [less ▲]

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See detailLIVER TRANSPLANTATION FROM DONATION AFTER CARDIOCIRCULATORY DEATH (DCD) DONORS: BELGIAN EXPERIENCE 2003-2009
DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; Cicarelli, Olga et al

in Transplant International (2011, September), 24(2), 84-84

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See detailMULTICENTER BELGIAN SURVEY ON DONOR MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY IN ADULT-TO-ADULT LIVING DONOR LIVER TRANSPLANTATION
Troisi, Roberto I; Vogelaers, Dirk; Lerut, Jan et al

in Transplant International (2011, September), 24(2), 13-13

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See detailLiver transplantation for acute hepatic failure due to chemotherapy-induced HBV reactivation in lymphoma patients.
Noterdaeme, Timothee; Longree, Luc; Bataille, Christian ULg et al

in World journal of gastroenterology : WJG (2011), 17(25), 3069-72

Hepatitis B (HBV) reactivation induced by chemotherapy is problem encountered recently in the management of malignant diseases. Chemotherapy-induced HBV reactivation may ultimately lead to terminal acute ... [more ▼]

Hepatitis B (HBV) reactivation induced by chemotherapy is problem encountered recently in the management of malignant diseases. Chemotherapy-induced HBV reactivation may ultimately lead to terminal acute liver failure. Liver transplantation (LT) currently remains the only definitive treatment option for such cases, but is generally denied to patients suffering from malignancy. Here, the authors describe 2 cases of cancer-free and HBV graft re-infection-free survival after LT performed for terminal liver failure arising from HBV reactivation induced by chemotherapy for advanced stage lymphoma. These 2 cases, and some other reports in the literature, may suggest that patients suffering from hematologic malignancies and terminal liver disease can be considered for LT if the prognosis of their hematologic malignancy is good. [less ▲]

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See detailDCD liver transplantation: is donor age an issue?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; Le dinh, Hieu; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Liver Transplantation (2011, July), 17(6S1), 112

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See detailLaparoscopic repair of colonoscopic perforation: a new standard?
Coimbra Marques, Carla ULg; Bouffioux, Laurent ULg; Kohnen, Laurent ULg et al

in Surgical Endoscopy (2011), 25

BACKGROUND: Scientific evidence demonstrating interest in the laparoscopic approach for surgical repair of colonoscopic perforations is still lacking. The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Scientific evidence demonstrating interest in the laparoscopic approach for surgical repair of colonoscopic perforations is still lacking. The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 43 patients who suffered from colonic perforations after colonoscopy between 1989 and 2008 in two tertiary centers in order to compare the results of the laparoscopic and the open approaches to repair. METHODS: The patients' demographic data, perforation location, therapy, and outcome were recorded from the medical charts. Forty-two patients were managed operatively (19 laparoscopies and 23 laparotomies). In three patients who underwent explorative laparoscopy, the procedure had to be converted to laparotomy due to surgical difficulties. The patients who underwent laparotomy management had a longer period between the colonoscopy and the surgery (P = 0.056) and more stercoral contaminations. RESULTS: The mean hospital stay was shorter for the laparoscopy group (P = 0.02), which had fewer postoperative complications (P = 0.01) and no mortality (NS). CONCLUSION: This series demonstrates that early laparoscopic management of colonoscopic perforation is safe. Laparoscopic management may lead to reduced surgical and psychological stress for the patient because of its low morbidity and mortality rates and shorter hospital stay. However, the procedure should be converted to a laparotomy if necessary. [less ▲]

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See detailLiver transplantation for donation after cardiocirculatory death donors: Belgian experience 2003-2009
DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Ledinh, H.; Donckier, V. et al

Conference (2011, March 24)

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See detailDCD liver transplantation: is donor age an issue?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; le dinh, Hieu; Honoré, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2011, March 24)

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See detailLaparoscopic liver resection: monocentric university experience
Szecel, D.; ARENAS SANCHEZ, Maria Mara ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2011, March), 74(1), 30

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See detailDonation after Cardiac Death increases the number of liver grafts for liver transplantation
Ledinh, H.; HANS, Marie-France ULg; MONARD, Josée ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2011, March), 74(1), 10

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See detailFATAL SMALL FOR SIZE SYNDROME AFTER RIGHT LOBE DONATION
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; LAUWICK, Séverine ULg et al

in Transplant International (2011, February), 24(1), 8-8

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See detailLIVER TRANSPLANTATION FOR ACUTE HEPATIC FAILURE DUE TO CHEMOTHERAPY-INDUCED HEPATITIS B VIRUS REACTIVATION IN LYMPHOMA PATIENTS
Noterdaeme, T.; Longree, L.; Bataille, C. et al

in Transplant International (2011, February), 24(1), 10-10

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See detailLiver transplantation for hepatic trauma: Discussion about a case and its management.
HONORE, Charles ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Gilson, Nathalie ULg et al

in Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock (2011), 4(1), 137-9

Liver transplant for trauma is a rare condition with 19 cases described in the literature. We report the case of a 16-year-old patient who suffered a gradeV liver injury with a vena cava tear after a car ... [more ▼]

Liver transplant for trauma is a rare condition with 19 cases described in the literature. We report the case of a 16-year-old patient who suffered a gradeV liver injury with a vena cava tear after a car crash. After a computerized tomography (CT) scan, the patient was directly sent to the operating room where the surgeon performed a right hepatectomy extended to segment IV with a venous repair under discontinued hilar clamping. On day five, the patient developed acute liver failure and was put on an emergency transplant waiting list. He had a successful liver transplant 2 days later. Fifteen months after his transplant, the patient is alive and asymptomatic. This case report focuses on the patient's initial management, the importance of damage control surgery and the circumstances which finally led to the transplant. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis C of genotype 2: the role of medical invasive exams.
Putzeys, V.; GERARD, Christiane ULg; Bastens, B. et al

in Acta gastro-enterologica Belgica (2011), 74(2), 277-80

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Hepatitis C virus genotype 2 is the third in order of frequency in Belgium. The aim of this study was to better define the genotype 2 carriers' epidemiology characteristics. METHODS ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Hepatitis C virus genotype 2 is the third in order of frequency in Belgium. The aim of this study was to better define the genotype 2 carriers' epidemiology characteristics. METHODS: In a database comprising 1726 viremic hepatitis C virus patient from the south part of Belgium, the files of 98 genotype 2 carriers were reviewed. RESULTS: There was a strong association between genotype 2 and the mode of transmission. The rate of contamination by invasive medical exams was very high (23%), and statistically different from the one of the others genotypes. Eligibility for antiviral therapies and the rate of sustained viral response were high. CONCLUSION: HCV genotype 2 was highly associated with transmission by invasive medical exams. [less ▲]

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See detailPancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation: a minireview
SQUIFFLET, Jean-Paul ULg; LeDinh, Hieu; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2011), 43

Pancreas preservation by cold storage using University of Wisconsin solution was the <br />mainstay method used for pancreas transplantation during the past 2 decades. Other <br />solutions, such as HTK ... [more ▼]

Pancreas preservation by cold storage using University of Wisconsin solution was the <br />mainstay method used for pancreas transplantation during the past 2 decades. Other <br />solutions, such as HTK, Celsior, and SCOT 15, could not demonstrate any advantage for <br />short preservation periods. But the advent of clinical islet transplantation and the larger <br />use of controlled non–heart-beating donors have prompted the transplantation community <br />to develop methods for increasing pancreas graft quality while preventing ischemic <br />reperfusion damages. Oxygenation by 1- or 2-layer methods during pancreas preservation, <br />as well as the use of perfluorocarbons, might increase the islet yield. Based on the former <br />methods, there is a renewed interest in machine perfusion and oxygenation in pancreas <br />preservation for pancreas transplantation and islet preparation. [less ▲]

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See detailEsophageal cancer surgery in patients older than 75: long term results.
HONORE, Charles ULg; Al-Azzeh, Ali ULg; GILSON, Nathalie ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2011), 111(1), 12-7

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate short and long term results after esophageal cancer resection in patients older than 75. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the database of esophageal ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate short and long term results after esophageal cancer resection in patients older than 75. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the database of esophageal cancer surgically treated in our department between January 2003 and December 2009 to identify patients older than 75. The preoperative, operative, postoperative and long term characteristics were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 137 patient, 23 were older than 75. The histological subtype was adenocarcinoma in 100%. The surgical techniques were a "Lewis-Santy" procedure in 43%, a trans-hiatal resection in 22%, a "Sweet" procedure in 13%, a stripping in 13% and a McKeown procedure in 9%. The in-hospital postoperative mortality was 13%. The in-hospital postoperative morbidity (Dindo-Clavien Grade >2, deceased patients included) was 26%. In univariate analysis, no statistically significant risk factor of morbidity was found. A Charlson Comorbidity Index >2 was, in univariate analysis, the sole risk factor of postoperative mortality (p = 0.0362). The mean hospital stay was 22 +/- 12 days. The median survival was 24.2 months. The 5-year overall survival was 39% and the 5-year disease free survival was 26%.57% of long-term deaths were not cancer related. CONCLUSION: Esophageal surgery performed in selected patients older than 75 has an acceptable morbidity and mortality but when a severe complication occurs, it leads to death in half of the cases. Surgery enables a long term survival benefit. This study confirmed our attitude of not considering age as a contra-indication for esophageal surgery but rather considering general status, self-reliance and associated comorbidities for patients' selection. [less ▲]

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