References of "D'Argembeau, Arnaud"
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See detailFurther characterisation of self-defining memories in young adults: a study of a Swiss sample.
Lardi, Claudia; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Chanal, Julien et al

in Memory (2010), 18(3), 293-309

Several individual differences affecting four dimensions of self-defining memories (SDMs)--structure, content, affect, and autobiographical reasoning (Blagov & Singer, 2004; McLean & Fournier, 2008 ... [more ▼]

Several individual differences affecting four dimensions of self-defining memories (SDMs)--structure, content, affect, and autobiographical reasoning (Blagov & Singer, 2004; McLean & Fournier, 2008; Singer & Salovey, 1993)--have been observed in young adults (principally in North America). In this study we aimed to investigate the relationships between the different dimensions of SDMs, providing further evidence of the content validity of the Self-Defining Memory task. It was possible to discern two specific profiles from the three SDMs collected from each participant. Almost half the participants retrieved specific SDMs with little autobiographical reasoning and tension; the other participants retrieved an opposite profile, suggesting that there are individual differences in the cognitive and affective processes related to the construction of SDMs. The second aim of the study was to conduct across-cultural extension of research on SDMs, using a sample of Swiss young adults. The results were similar to those obtained by previous studies, suggesting a certain cultural invariability. The only difference observed concerned the number of SDMs containing meaning making. Swiss young adults attribute more explicit meanings to their memories than North American young adults, suggesting that they are more engaged in autobiographical reasoning. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural basis of personal goal processing when envisioning future events
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or ... [more ▼]

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or wishful thinking. The purpose of this functional magnetic resonance imaging study was to investigate the neural basis of such goal-directed processing during future-event simulation. Participants were scanned while they imagined future events that were related to their personal goals (personal future events) and future events that were plausible but unrelated to their personal goals (nonpersonal future events). Results showed that imaging personal future events elicited stronger activation in ventral medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) compared to imaging nonpersonal future events. Moreover, these brain activations overlapped with activations elicited by a second task that assessed semantic self-knowledge (i.e., making judgments on one's own personality traits), suggesting that ventral MPFC and PCC mediate self-referential processing across different functional domains. It is suggested that these brain regions may support a collection of processes that evaluate, code, and contextualize the relevance of mental representations with regard to personal goals. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the function instantiated by the default network of the brain are also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailScene construction in schizophrenia
Raffard, Stéphane; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Bayard, Sophie et al

in Neuropsychology (2010), 24

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See detailComponent processes underlying future thinking
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Ortoleva, Claudia; Jumentier, Sabrina et al

in Memory & Cognition (2010), 38

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See detailNeural correlates of personal goal processing when envisioning future events
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2009, December 10)

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See detailSelf-referential processing in future thinking
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2009, May 27)

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See detailFunctional neuroimaging of semantic and episodic forms of self-knowledge
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2009, January 15)

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See detailPerspective taking to assess self-personality: What's modified in Alzheimer's disease?
Ruby, Perrine; Collette, Fabienne ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg et al

in Neurobiology of Aging (2009), 30(10), 1637-1651

Personality changes are frequently described by caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease, while they are less often reported by the patients. This relative anosognosia of Alzheimer disease (AD ... [more ▼]

Personality changes are frequently described by caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease, while they are less often reported by the patients. This relative anosognosia of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients for personality changes might be related to impaired self-judgment and to decreased ability to understand their caregiver's perspective. To investigate this issue, we explored the cerebral correlates of self-assessment and perspective taking in patients with mild AD, elderly and young volunteers. All subjects assessed relevance of personality traits adjectives for self and a relative, taking either their own or their relative's perspective, during a functional imaging experiment. The comparison of subject's and relative's answers provided congruency scores used to assess self-judgment and perspective taking performance. The self-judgment "accuracy" score was diminished in AD, and when patients assessed adjectives for self-relevance, they predominantly activated bilateral intraparietal sulci (IPS). Previous studies associated IPS activation with familiarity judgment, which AD patients would use more than recollection when retrieving information to assess self-personality. When taking a third-person perspective, patients activated prefrontal regions (similarly to young volunteers), while elderly controls recruited visual associative areas (also activated by young volunteers). This suggests that mild AD patients relied more on reasoning processes than on visual imagery of autobiographical memories to take their relative's perspective. This strategy may help AD patients to cope with episodic memory impairment even if it does not prevent them from making some mind-reading errors. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring self-defining memories in schizophrenia.
Raffard, Stephane; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Lardi, Claudia et al

in Memory (2009), 17(1), 26-38

Previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia are impaired in recalling specific events from their personal past. However, the relationship between autobiographical memory impairments and ... [more ▼]

Previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia are impaired in recalling specific events from their personal past. However, the relationship between autobiographical memory impairments and disturbance of the sense of identity in schizophrenia has not been investigated in detail. In this study the authors investigated schizophrenic patients' ability to recall self-defining memories; that is, memories that play an important role in building and maintaining the self-concept. Results showed that patients recalled as many specific self-defining memories as healthy participants. However, patients with schizophrenia exhibited an abnormal reminiscence bump and reported different types of thematic content (i.e., they recalled less memories about past achievements and more memories regarding hospitalisation and stigmatisation of illness). Furthermore, the findings suggest that impairments in extracting meaning from personal memories could represent a core disturbance of autobiographical memory in patients with schizophrenia. [less ▲]

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See detailMindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS): Psychometric Properties of the French Translation and Exploration of Its Relations With Emotion Regulation Strategies
Jermann, F.; Billieux, J.; Laroi, Frank ULg et al

in Psychological Assessment (2009), 21(4), 506-514

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See detailExploration du réseau cérébral impliqué dans des jugements sur soi chez les personnes jeunes et âgées
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg et al

Poster (2008, September 04)

Nous avons récemment observé que le cortex préfrontal ventro-médial (CPFVM) est activé à la fois chez des sujets jeunes et âgés dans une tâche de jugement d’adjectifs nécessitant d’évaluer sa propre ... [more ▼]

Nous avons récemment observé que le cortex préfrontal ventro-médial (CPFVM) est activé à la fois chez des sujets jeunes et âgés dans une tâche de jugement d’adjectifs nécessitant d’évaluer sa propre personnalité par rapport à celle d’un autre dans le contexte d’un prise de perspective à la première (1PP) et à la troisième (3PP) personne (Ruby et al., submitted). Nous avons poursuivi l’analyse de ces données par des analyses de connectivité fonctionnelle afin de déterminer le réseau des régions cérébrales associées à la performance des sujets jeunes et âgés. Les résultats montrent qu’en 1PP, l’activité du CPFVM est associée à celle du gyrus frontal inférieur et du gyrus parahippocampique chez les sujet âgés, mais uniquement à celle du cortex occipital chez les sujets jeunes. En 3PP, une connectivité fonctionnelle existe entre le CPFVM et le gyrus frontal médial, le gyrus frontal inférieur et les régions temporales supérieures chez les sujets âgées ; mais uniquement avec les régions occipitale et pariétale chez les sujets jeunes. Les régions cérébrales associées à l’activité du CPFVM chez les sujets jeunes ont été décrites comme impliquées dans la récupération en mémoire autobiographique ainsi que dans les processus de « mentalizing ». En ce qui concerne les personne âgées, le réseau cérébral découvert est relié à la récupération de souvenirs sémantique et épisodique (gyrus parahippocampique et temporal supérieur) mais aussi à l’attribution d’une valence émotionnelle à l’adjectif (gyrus frontal inférieur) et à la prise de perspective (gyrus frontal médial). Ces résultats indiquent (1) que le CPFVM est connecté à un réseau cérébral plus important chez les personnes âgées que chez les jeunes lors de jugement sur soi ; (2) que les sujets jeunes réalisent la tâche sur base d’informations autobiographiques seulement alors que les personnes âgées recrutent en plus des processus cognitifs de nature plus réflexive. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural network involved in self-judgment in young and elderly adults
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg et al

Poster (2008, May 29)

In agreement with the literature, we have recently observed that the ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) is activated both in young and elderly subjects during a adjective judgment task requiring ... [more ▼]

In agreement with the literature, we have recently observed that the ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) is activated both in young and elderly subjects during a adjective judgment task requiring judgment about self vs. other in the context of a first (1PP) or third (3PP) perspective-taking (Ruby et al., submitted). Here, we have performed functional connectivity analyses to determine the network of cerebral areas associated to the performance of young and elderly subjects. <br />Results indicate that, in the 1PP condition, activity of the VMPFC is related to the inferior frontal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus in elderly but to the occipital cortex only in young subjects. In the 3PP condition, functional connectivity exist between the VMPFC and medial frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus and superior temporal areas in elderly, but with occipital and parietal areas only in young subjects. <br />The cerebral areas associated to VMPFC activity in young subjects were previously described as involved both in autobiographical memory retrieval and mentalizing processes. With regard to elderly, the cerebral network evidenced is related to retrieval of semantic and episodic memories (parahippocampal and superior temporal) but also to the attribution of emotional valence to the adjectives (inferior frontal) and perspective taking (medial frontal gyrus). <br />These results indicate (1) that the VMPFC is connected to a larger cerebral network in elderly than in young subjects during self judgements; (2) that young subjects perform the task on the basis of autobiographical information retrieval only, while elderly subjects use supplementary, more reflexive, cognitive processes. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural network involved in young and elderly adults
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Cognitive Aging Conference (2008, April 11)

In agreement with the literature, we have recently observed that the ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) is activated both in young and elderly subjects during a adjective judgment task requiring ... [more ▼]

In agreement with the literature, we have recently observed that the ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) is activated both in young and elderly subjects during a adjective judgment task requiring judgment about self vs. other in the context of a first (1PP) or third (3PP) perspective-taking (Ruby et al., submitted). Here, we have performed functional connectivity analyses to determine the network of cerebral areas associated to the performance of young and elderly subjects. Results indicate that, in the 1PP condition, activity of the VMPFC is related to the medial orbito-frontal, posterior and inferior temporal and parietal areas in elderly, but to the occipital cortex only in young subjects. In the 3PP condition, functional connectivity exist between the VMPFC and posterior temporal and lateral orbito-frontal areas in elderly, but with occipital and parietal areas only in young subjects. The cerebral areas associated to VMPFC activity in young subjects were previously described as involved both in autobiographic memory retrieval and mentalizing processes. With regard to elderly, the cerebral network evidenced is related to autobiographic memory retrieval (parietal and temporal areas) but also to the attribution of emotional valence to the adjectives (medial orbito-frontal) and perspective taking both in 1PP and 3PP conditions (lateral orbito-frontal). These results indicate (1) that the VMPFC is connected to a larger cerebral network in elderly than in young subjects during self judgements; (2) that young subjects perform the task on the basis of autobiographical information retrieval only, while elderly subjects use supplementary, more reflexive, cognitive processes. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of Envisioning Emotional Events in the near and Far Future
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhong-Lin et al

in NeuroImage (2008), 40(1), 398-407

Being able to envision emotional events that might happen in the future has a clear adaptive value. This study addressed the functional neuroanatomy of this process and investigated whether it is ... [more ▼]

Being able to envision emotional events that might happen in the future has a clear adaptive value. This study addressed the functional neuroanatomy of this process and investigated whether it is modulated by temporal distance. Participants imagined positive and negative events pertaining to the near future or far future while their brain activity was measured with fMRI. The results demonstrate that the anterior part of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) was more active in envisioning emotional events in the far future than in the near future, whereas the caudate nucleus was engaged in envisioning emotional (especially positive) situations in the near future. We argue that the anterior part of the vmPFC might assign emotional values to mental representations of future events that pertain to long-term goals. On the other hand, the caudate might support more concrete simulations of action plans to achieve rewarding situations in the near future. [less ▲]

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See detailRemembering the Past and Imagining the Future in Schizophrenia
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Raffard, Stéphane; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Journal of Abnormal Psychology (2008), 117(1), 247-51

It has been suggested that patients with schizophrenia experience a distorted sense of continuity of self across time. However, temporal aspects of self-processing have received little empirical attention ... [more ▼]

It has been suggested that patients with schizophrenia experience a distorted sense of continuity of self across time. However, temporal aspects of self-processing have received little empirical attention in schizophrenia. In this study, the authors investigated schizophrenic patients' ability to generate specific mental images of their personal past and future. Results showed that patients recalled fewer specific past events than did healthy controls and were even more impaired in generating specific future events. These deficits were associated with positive symptoms but were not associated with negative symptoms or with performances on verbal fluency tasks. It is suggested that schizophrenic patients' failures to project themselves into specific past and future episodes might be related to difficulties in retrieving contextual details from memory, as well as disturbance of the sense of subjective time. [less ▲]

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See detailImagerie cérébrale de la réflexion sur soi
Salmon, Eric ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

Precise brain regions are activated when a subject gives a judgment on himself. Those are the medial parietal cortex, essentially related to episodic memory processing, and the ventromedial prefrontal ... [more ▼]

Precise brain regions are activated when a subject gives a judgment on himself. Those are the medial parietal cortex, essentially related to episodic memory processing, and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, recruited for evaluating the personal valence of an information. These regions are not activated in Alzheimer's disease. The decrease of awareness for own deficits in a patient with Alzheimer's disease would depend on a reduction of episodic memory capacities and a worsening of judgment for self significance. [less ▲]

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See detailLe fonctionnement cognitif dans la phobie sociale
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Van der Linden, Martial; Ceschi, Gracia (Eds.) Traité de psychopathologie cognitive (Tome II) (2008)

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See detailEmbodiment effects in memory for facial identity and facial expression
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Lepper, Miriam; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Cognition & Emotion (2008), 22

Research suggests that states of the body, such as postures, facial expressions, and arm movements, play central roles in social information processing. This study investigated the effects of approach ... [more ▼]

Research suggests that states of the body, such as postures, facial expressions, and arm movements, play central roles in social information processing. This study investigated the effects of approach/avoidance movements on memory for facial information. Faces displaying a happy or a sad expression were presented and participants were induced to perform either an approach (arm flexion) or an avoidance (arm extension) movement. States of awareness associated with memory for facial identity and memory for facial expression were then assessed with the Remember/Know/Guess paradigm. The results showed that performing avoidance movements increased Know responses for the identity, and Know/Guess responses for the expression, of valence-compatible stimuli (i.e., sad faces as compared to happy faces), whereas this was not the case for approach movements. Based on these findings, it is suggested that approach/avoidance motor actions influence memory encoding by increasing the ease of processing for valence-compatible information. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories and imagined events in sub-clinical obsessive-compulsive checkers
Zermatten, Ariane; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg et al

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (2008), 22(1), 113-125

Phenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories and imagined experiences were examined in checking- and non-checking-prone individuals. Participants were asked to retrieve a positive, a negative ... [more ▼]

Phenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories and imagined experiences were examined in checking- and non-checking-prone individuals. Participants were asked to retrieve a positive, a negative and a neutral memory, and to imagine a positive, a negative and a neutral experience. They were then requested to evaluate each event according to characteristics such as sensory and contextual details. The main results revealed that non-checking-prone participants reported more general vividness than checking-prone individuals for real events. In addition, non-checking-prone individuals reported more visual details and vividness for real than imagined experiences, while no difference between real and imagined events was found for checking-prone participants. These results suggest that checking-prone participants report poor memories of real events, which could in turn explain their difficulties distinguishing between real and imagined events. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentity recognition and happy and sad facial expression recall: Influence of depressive symptoms
Jermann, Françoise; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

in Memory (2008), 16(4), 364-373

Relatively few studies have examined memory bias for social stimuli in depression or dysphoria. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of depressive symptoms on memory for facial ... [more ▼]

Relatively few studies have examined memory bias for social stimuli in depression or dysphoria. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of depressive symptoms on memory for facial information. A total of 234 participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory II and a task examining memory for facial identity and expression of happy and sad faces. For both facial identity and expression, the recollective experience was measured with the Remember/Know/Guess procedure (Gardiner Richardson-Klavehn, 2000). The results show no major association between depressive symptoms and memory for identities. However, dysphoric individuals consciously recalled (Remember responses) more sad facial expressions than non-dysphoric individuals. These findings suggest that sad facial expressions led to more elaborate encoding, and thereby better recollection, in dysphoric individuals. [less ▲]

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