References of "D'Argembeau, Arnaud"
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See detailPhenomenology of future-oriented mind-wandering episodes
Stawarczyk, David ULg; CASSOL, Héléna ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

in Frontiers in Psychology (2013), 4

Recent research suggests that prospective and non-prospective forms of mind-wandering possess distinct properties, yet little is known about what exactly differentiates between future-oriented and non ... [more ▼]

Recent research suggests that prospective and non-prospective forms of mind-wandering possess distinct properties, yet little is known about what exactly differentiates between future-oriented and non-future-oriented mind-wandering episodes. In the present study, we used multilevel exploratory factor analyses to examine the factorial structure of various phenomenological dimensions of mind-wandering, and we then investigated whether future-oriented mind-wandering episodes differ from other classes of mind-wandering along the identified factors. We found that the phenomenological dimensions of mind-wandering are structured in four factors: representational format (inner speech vs. visual imagery), personal relevance, realism/concreteness, and structuration. Prospective mind-wandering differed from non-prospective mind-wandering along each of these factors. Specifically, future-oriented mind-wandering episodes involved inner speech to a greater extent, were more personally relevant, more realistic/concrete, and more often part of structured sequences of thoughts. These results show that future-oriented mind-wandering possesses a unique phenomenological signature and provide new insights into how this particular form of mind-wandering may adaptively contribute to autobiographical planning. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in self-processing: the valuation hypothesis
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2013), 7

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See detailConcern-induced negative affect is associated with the occurrence and content of mind-wandering
Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

in Consciousness & Cognition (2013), 22(2), 442-448

Previous research has shown that the content and frequency of mind-wandering episodes—the occurrence of thoughts that are both stimulus-independent and task-unrelated—are closely related to an ... [more ▼]

Previous research has shown that the content and frequency of mind-wandering episodes—the occurrence of thoughts that are both stimulus-independent and task-unrelated—are closely related to an individual’s future-related concerns. Whether this relationship is shaped by the affective changes that are usually associated with future-related concerns still remains unclear, however. In this study, we induced the anticipation of a negatively valenced event and examined whether the ensuing affective changes were related to the occurrence and content of mind-wandering during an unrelated attentional task. We found that the increase in negative affect following concern induction predicted the general frequency of mind-wandering episodes. Furthermore, mind-wandering episodes specifically directed at the induced concern were related to a lower decrease in negative affect during the attentional task. These results suggest that the negative emotional impact of future-related concerns is an important factor to be taken into consideration for the subsequent occurrence of mind-wandering episodes, which might in turn be involved in the maintenance of negative affect over time. [less ▲]

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See detailMind-wandering and attentional control: two sides of the same coin or independent processes?
Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2012, May 11)

Mind-wandering refers to the occurrence of thoughts whose content is both unrelated to the task that we are currently carrying out and decoupled from current sensory perceptions (e.g., having our mind ... [more ▼]

Mind-wandering refers to the occurrence of thoughts whose content is both unrelated to the task that we are currently carrying out and decoupled from current sensory perceptions (e.g., having our mind distracted by past memories or future concerns when reading a novel). Recent frameworks suggest that the occurrence of mind-wandering reflects temporary breakdowns in attentional control processes. Other proposals however consider that mind-wandering is a cognitive process of its own, independent of attentional control. Based on the dual mechanisms of control framework (Braver et al., 2007), we examined whether proactive and reactive attentional control processes (measured with the A-X Continuous Performance Test), as well as working memory capacity (WMC), are related to the occurrence of mind-wandering during the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). Results showed that WMC was positively related to proactive but not reactive control, while the frequency of mind-wandering was unrelated to these three measures of attentional control. Additionally, we found that proactive control, reactive control, WMC, and mind-wandering contributed significantly and independently to the prediction of commission errors during the SART. These results suggest that mind-wandering is not the mere reflection of attentional control abilities and that these two factors have separate influences on task performance. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing the daydreaming frequency scale to investigate the relationships between mind-wandering, psychological well-being, and present-moment awareness
Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Frontiers in Psychology (2012), 3

Recent findings have shown that mind-wandering – the occurrence of stimulusindependent and task-unrelated thoughts – is associated with negative affect and lower psychological well-being. However, it ... [more ▼]

Recent findings have shown that mind-wandering – the occurrence of stimulusindependent and task-unrelated thoughts – is associated with negative affect and lower psychological well-being. However, it remains unclear whether this relationship is due to the occurrence of mind-wandering per se or to the fact that people who mind wander more tend to be generally less attentive to present-moment experience. In three studies, we first validate a French translation of a retrospective self-report questionnaire widely used to assess the general occurrence of mind-wandering in daily life – the Daydreaming Frequency Scale. Using this questionnaire, we then show that the relationship between mind-wandering frequency and psychological distress is fully accounted for by individual differences in dispositional mindful awareness and encoding style.These findings suggest that it may not be mind-wandering per se that is responsible for psychological distress, but rather the general tendency to be less aware and attentive to the present-moment. Thus, although mind-wandering and present-moment awareness are related constructs, they are not reducible to one another, and are distinguishable in terms of their relationship with psychological well-being. [less ▲]

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See detailMémoire et projection de soi dans le futur
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

in Brédart, Serge; Van der Linden, Martial (Eds.) Identité et cognition : Apports de la psychologie et de la neuroscience cognitives (2012)

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See detailOn the representational systems underlying prospection: Evidence from the event-cueing paradigm.
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Demblon, Julie ULg

in Cognition (2012), 125(2), 160-167

The ability to think about the future-prospection-is central to many aspects of human cognition and behavior, from planning and decision making, to self-control and the construction of a sense of identity ... [more ▼]

The ability to think about the future-prospection-is central to many aspects of human cognition and behavior, from planning and decision making, to self-control and the construction of a sense of identity. Yet, the exact nature of the representational systems underlying prospection is not fully understood. Recent findings point to the critical role of episodic memory in imagining specific future events, but it is unlikely that prospection depends solely on this system. Using an event-cueing paradigm in two studies, we here show that specific events that people imagine might happen in their personal future are commonly embedded in broader event sequences-termed event clusters-that link a set of envisioned events according to causal and thematic relations. These findings provide novel evidence that prospection relies on multiple representational systems, with general autobiographical knowledge structures providing a frame that organizes imagined events in overarching event sequences. The results further suggest that knowledge about personal goals plays an important role in structuring these event sequences, especially for the distant future. [less ▲]

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See detailAutobiographical memory and future thinking
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

in Berntsen, Dorthe; Rubin, David (Eds.) Understanding autobiographical memory: Theories and approaches (2012)

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See detailAttention Supports Verbal Short-Term Memory via Competition between Dorsal and Ventral Attention Networks.
Majerus, Steve ULg; Attout, Lucie ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg et al

in Cerebral Cortex (2012), 22

Interactions between the neural correlates of short-term memory (STM) and attention have been actively studied in the visual STM domain but much less in the verbal STM domain. Here we show that the same ... [more ▼]

Interactions between the neural correlates of short-term memory (STM) and attention have been actively studied in the visual STM domain but much less in the verbal STM domain. Here we show that the same attention mechanisms that have been shown to shape the neural networks of visual STM also shape those of verbal STM. Based on previous research in visual STM, we contrasted the involvement of a dorsal attention network centered on the intraparietal sulcus supporting task-related attention and a ventral attention network centered on the temporoparietal junction supporting stimulus-related attention. We observed that, with increasing STM load, the dorsal attention network was activated while the ventral attention network was deactivated, especially during early maintenance. Importantly, activation in the ventral attention network increased in response to task-irrelevant stimuli briefly presented during the maintenance phase of the STM trials but only during low-load STM conditions, which were associated with the lowest levels of activity in the dorsal attention network during encoding and early maintenance. By demonstrating a trade-off between task-related and stimulus-related attention networks during verbal STM, this study highlights the dynamics of attentional processes involved in verbal STM. [less ▲]

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See detailPredicting the phenomenology of episodic future thoughts
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Consciousness & Cognition (2012), 21

Recent findings suggest that multiple event properties contribute to shape the phenomenology of episodic future thoughts, but the specific role of each property is not yet fully understood. This study ... [more ▼]

Recent findings suggest that multiple event properties contribute to shape the phenomenology of episodic future thoughts, but the specific role of each property is not yet fully understood. This study shows that different phenomenological features are predicted by distinct event properties. The vividness of an episodic future thought largely depends on the familiarity of its constitutive elements (i.e., the envisioned location, persons and objects), while the visual perspective adopted is instead related to the temporal distance of the imagined event. Cognitive feelings such as the sense of pre-experiencing the future depend on sensory-perceptual qualities, and are further modulated by the personal importance attributed to the event. These findings suggest that the essence of episodic future thought—the sensation of mentally visiting one’s personal future—lies, in part, in the relevance of imagined events with respect to personal goals. [less ▲]

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See detailComparing the neural bases of self-referential processing in typically developing and 22q11.2 adolescents
Schneider, Maude; Debbané, Martin; Lagioia, Anna Laura et al

in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience (2012), 2

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See detailSelf-defining future projections: exploring the identity function of thinking about the future
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Lardi, Claudia; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Memory (2012), 20

The act of projecting oneself into meaningful future events may significantly contribute to a person’s sense of self and identity. Yet, if the role of memories, in particular self-defining memories (SDMs ... [more ▼]

The act of projecting oneself into meaningful future events may significantly contribute to a person’s sense of self and identity. Yet, if the role of memories, in particular self-defining memories (SDMs), in grounding the self is now well established, the identity function of anticipated future events has received comparatively little attention. This article introduces the construct of self-defining future projection (SDFP) to address this issue. Two studies show that people can readily identify significant future events that they frequently think about and that convey core information about who they are as individuals. Furthermore, a person’s particular style of constructing SDMs is similarly manifested in SDFPs, suggesting that both types of events can be used to ground the self. Notably, people who display a stronger tendency to extract meaning from their past experiences also reflect more about the potential implications of imagined future events. The results further demonstrate that SDMs and SDFPs both give rise to a strong sense of personal continuity over time and are meaningfully related to self-esteem. Together, these findings lend support to the idea that a person’s sense of self and identity is in part nourished by the anticipation of significant future events. [less ▲]

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See detailValuing One's Self: Medial Prefrontal Involvement in Epistemic and Emotive Investments in Self-views.
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Cerebral Cortex (2012), 22

Recent neuroimaging research has revealed that the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is consistently engaged when people form mental representations of themselves. However, the precise function of this ... [more ▼]

Recent neuroimaging research has revealed that the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is consistently engaged when people form mental representations of themselves. However, the precise function of this region in self-representation is not yet fully understood. Here, we investigate whether the MPFC contributes to epistemic and emotive investments in self-views, which are essential components of the self-concept that stabilize self-views and shape how one feels about oneself. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that the level of activity in the MPFC when people think about their personal traits (by judging trait adjectives for self-descriptiveness) depends on their investments in the particular self-view under consideration, as assessed by postscan rating scales. Furthermore, different forms of investments are associated with partly distinct medial prefrontal areas: a region of the dorsal MPFC is uniquely related to the degree of certainty with which a particular self-view is held (one's epistemic investment), whereas a region of the ventral MPFC responds specifically to the importance attached to this self-view (one's emotive investment). These findings provide new insight into the role of the MPFC in self-representation and suggest that the ventral MPFC confers degrees of value upon the particular conception of the self that people construct at a given moment. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural basis of semantic and episodic forms of self-knowledge: insights from functional neuroimaging
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg

in Lopez-Larrea, Carlos (Ed.) Sensing in nature (2012)

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See detailValue and the self in the medial prefrontal cortex
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2011, August 04)

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See detailFuture thinking and the self
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2011, August 04)

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