References of "Croisier, Jean-Louis"
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See detailExuberant inflammatory reaction after an infiltration of platelet-rich plasma to treat tendinopathy
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; LEONARD, Philippe ULg et al

in Book of abstracts of 18th Annual Congress of the ECSS (2013, June)

Background: PRP, obtained from centrifuged autologous blood, contains a large quantity of growth factors, which may enhance the tissue healing processes. Local infiltration of PRP represents a relatively ... [more ▼]

Background: PRP, obtained from centrifuged autologous blood, contains a large quantity of growth factors, which may enhance the tissue healing processes. Local infiltration of PRP represents a relatively new treatment for tendinopathies. To date, no side effects have been reported after infiltration of PRP to treat tendinopathy. Case report: A 35-year-old patient had a right upper patellar tendinopathy which was resistant to all conservative treatments for more than 6 months. The patient was a type 1 diabetic (well controlled). He had an intratendinous infiltration of 6 mL of PRP (8.105 platelets/mm3, almost no red or white blood cells) after disinfection but without local anaesthetic. Immediately following the infiltration, local cryotherapy was performed for 15 minutes. NSAIDs were avoided, but class-1 or -2 pain-killers were authorised if necessary. A standardised sub-maximal eccentric rehabilitation should have been started 1 week after. However, the patient experienced local swelling with erythema, increased heating and pain which appeared just underneath the patella, but without biological inflammatory syndrome. A great Doppler signal in a thicker patellar tendon was observed by US, but there was no sign of local infectious disease demonstrated by either CT or MRI. However, the local inflammation did not decrease after a progressive 3-week treatment of local cryotherapy, local and oral NSAIDs and colchicine 1 mg. Thus, an insidious infection was suspected, even though there was neither evidence of biological inflammatory syndrome nor sign of infectious lesion on imagery examination. An antibiotic therapy (rifampicine 600 mg + minocycline 100 mg) was initiated for 3 months. Finally, a 3-phase bone scintigraphy suggested the presence of a complex regional pain syndrome type 1 treated by a classical physical therapy and concomitant class-2 pain killers. The evolution was favourable after 6 months of symptomatic treatment, and the pain decreased to a level similar to that before the infiltration of PRP. Discussion/Conclusions: This case report draws attention to potential side effects that are linked to this new therapy by infiltration of platelet rich plasma in case of tendinopathy, in particular when used in patients with type 1 diabetes. Thus, the balance between benefits and risks must be carefully evaluated before using this treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes. Reference: Platelet-rich plasma application in the management of chronic tendinopathies. Acta Orthop Belg 2013; 79: 10-15. [less ▲]

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See detailPlatelet-rich plasma (PRP) to treat upper patellar tendinopathies
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; SIMONI, Paolo ULg et al

in Book of abstracts of 18th Annual Congress of the ECSS (2013, June)

Introduction: Tendinopathies, especially upper patellar tendinopathy also known as jumper’s knee, often remain rebel to conservative treatments. Several experimental studies have shown the healing ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Tendinopathies, especially upper patellar tendinopathy also known as jumper’s knee, often remain rebel to conservative treatments. Several experimental studies have shown the healing properties of platelet and their growth factors. These factors have the potentiality to improve healing of different tissues: bones, muscles, tendons... Researches have specifically demonstrated the platelets action as mediator and/or enhancer of tissue healing. On the other hand, such treatment has been totally removed of list of doping treatments. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of 1 injection of PRP in patients suffering from chronic jumper’s knee. Methods: Patients performed imaging (US and MRI) and functional assessments, and a clinical examination using an algometer, before treatment and 6 weeks after PRP treatment. They were also invited to answer to questionnaire relative to pain and functional status. PRP was obtained from autologous blood using an apheresis system (COM.TEC, Fresenius). The injection of 6mL of PRP was realised without local anaesthesia into the proximal insertion of the patellar tendon. A 48h rest-time was recommended after infiltration. Afterwards, a submaximal eccentric reeducation was initiated 1 week after infiltration 3 times a week during 5 weeks. In case of pain, anti-inflammatory drugs were prohibited and patient were encouraged to take class I or II painbrakers. Our protocol was approved by Ethic Committee of University and University Hospital of Liège. Results: Eighteen patients with jumper’s knee were included in our study. Pre-injection tests revealed pain of the upper part of the patellar tendon just below the patella, associated with loss of function. Imaging exams confirmed diagnosis. Six weeks post-injection, the clinical status was improved for the majority of the patients, with a significant decrease of algo-functional scores. The pain reported during functional assessments was decreased (in particular for the eccentric actions), yet no significant improvement of physical performances was observed. We found no significant differences between imaging exams before and 6 weeks after PRP injection. Conclusion: One in situ injection of PRP clinically improved patients with jumper’s knee 6 weeks after treatment. Most patients reported a decrease of pain during day-life and through physical activities. However nor functional performances neither imaging were improved. A followup at 3 months is actually in process to evaluate more long term efficacy of PRP treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of an accelerometer-based approach to quantify gait events
Boutaayamou, Mohamed ULg; Schwartz, Cédric ULg; Stamatakis, Julien et al

Poster (2013, June)

Researchers rarely provide solid performance and validation information about their acceleometer-based approaches to human gait analysis. We present here a novel signal processing and analysis algorithm ... [more ▼]

Researchers rarely provide solid performance and validation information about their acceleometer-based approaches to human gait analysis. We present here a novel signal processing and analysis algorithm that automatically extracts four consecutive fundamental events of walking: heel strike (HS), toe strike (TS), heel off (HO), and toe off (TO). In addition, we validate this accelerometer-based technique by comparing these extracted gait events with those obtained by a kinematic 3D analysis system and a force plate, used as gold standards. [less ▲]

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See detailExuberant inflammatory reaction after an infiltration of platelet-rich plasma (PRP)
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; LEONARD, Philippe ULg et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2013, June), 47(10 (e3)), 92

Background: PRP, obtained from centrifuged autologous blood, contains a large quantity of growth factors, which may enhance the tissue healing processes. Local infiltration of PRP represents a relatively ... [more ▼]

Background: PRP, obtained from centrifuged autologous blood, contains a large quantity of growth factors, which may enhance the tissue healing processes. Local infiltration of PRP represents a relatively new treatment for tendinopathies. To date, no side effects have been reported after infiltration of PRP to treat tendinopathy. Case report: A 35-year-old patient had a right upper patellar tendinopathy which was resistant to all conservative treatments for more than 6 months. The patient was a type 1 diabetic (well controlled). He had an intratendinous infiltration of 6 mL of PRP (8.105 platelets/mm3, almost no red or white blood cells) after disinfection but without local anaesthetic. Immediately following the infiltration, local cryotherapy was performed for 15 minutes. NSAIDs were avoided, but class-1 or -2 pain-killers were authorised if necessary. A standardised sub-maximal eccentric rehabilitation should have been started 1 week after. However, the patient experienced local swelling with erythema, increased heating and pain which appeared just underneath the patella, but without biological inflammatory syndrome. A great Doppler signal in a thicker patellar tendon was observed by US, but there was no sign of local infectious disease demonstrated by either CT or MRI. However, the local inflammation did not decrease after a progressive 3-week treatment of local cryotherapy, local and oral NSAIDs and colchicine 1 mg. Thus, an insidious infection was suspected, even though there was neither evidence of biological inflammatory syndrome nor sign of infectious lesion on imagery examination. An antibiotic therapy (rifampicine 600 mg + minocycline 100 mg) was initiated for 3 months. Finally, a 3-phase bone scintigraphy suggested the presence of a complex regional pain syndrome type 1 treated by a classical physical therapy and concomitant class-2 pain killers. The evolution was favourable after 6 months of symptomatic treatment, and the pain decreased to a level similar to that before the infiltration of PRP. Discussion/Conclusions: This case report draws attention to potential side effects that are linked to this new therapy by infiltration of platelet rich plasma in case of tendinopathy, in particular when used in patients with type 1 diabetes. Thus, the balance between benefits and risks must be carefully evaluated before using this treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes. Reference: Platelet-rich plasma application in the management of chronic tendinopathies. Acta Orthop Belg 2013; 79: 10-15. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of eccentric versus concentric training on mouse muscle phenotype
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Abstract Book of 10th Meeting of Belgian Society for Neuroscience (2013, May)

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See detailEpreuves isocinétiques de résistance à la fatigue
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Bosquet, L.; Maquet, Didier ULg et al

in Lettre de Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation (2013)

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See detailReturn-To-Play criteria after hamstring injury: actual medicine practice in professional soccer
Delvaux, François ULg; Rochcongar, Pierre; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

Poster (2013, April 25)

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See detailQuantitative gait assessment using an accelerometer technology as a predictive tool of falls among nursing home residents: a 6-month prospective study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Detalle, Anne-Sophie; Demonceau, Marie ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013, April), 24(Suppl.1), 210

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See detailPrévention des courbatures musculaires en pratique sportive
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Delvaux, François; Rodriguez de la Cruz, Carlos ULg et al

in Prévention des lésions musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

L’exercice excentrique, lorsqu’il est réalisé de manière intense et/ou inhabituelle, est réputé être à l’origine de diverses sensations de courbatures d’apparition retardée. Ces douleurs musculaires ... [more ▼]

L’exercice excentrique, lorsqu’il est réalisé de manière intense et/ou inhabituelle, est réputé être à l’origine de diverses sensations de courbatures d’apparition retardée. Ces douleurs musculaires, appelées DOMS pour Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness, s’accompagnent de déficits structuro-fonctionnels pouvant persister pendant plusieurs jours. Bien qu’il disparaisse spontanément après quelques jours de récupération, le phénomène des DOMS reste problématique chez le sportif en raison des conséquences néfastes associées : perturbation de l’entraînement sportif, diminution de la performance athlétique et majoration du risque de lésions véritables en cas de poursuite d’activités sportives. Il apparaît donc essentiel, pour un sportif soumis à un entraînement excentrique, d’échapper aux DOMS. La mise au point d’approches susceptibles de réduire les conséquences néfastes des DOMS a constitué un objectif prioritaire de nombreuses études. Ainsi, les premiers essais ont été basés sur des stratégies nutritionnelles ou pharmacologiques ainsi que sur des procédés cliniques. Bien que certains procédés tels que le massage ou les apports nutritionnels puissent influencer de manière positive l’un ou l’autre symptôme, ceux-ci ne semblent pas capables d’agir sur le phénomène des DOMS dans sa globalité. Actuellement, la seule démarche préventive réellement efficace reste la réalisation d’un entraînement excentrique à intensité sous-maximale progressivement intensifiées. [less ▲]

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See detailLe travail excentrique : aspects musculaires et tendineux
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg et al

in Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

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See detailApplication pratique du concept de charge de travail au sein d'un club de football professionnel
Rodriguez de la Cruz, Carlos ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Vervier, J. et al

in Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

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See detailLa lésion musculaire des ischio-jambiers
Delvaux, François ULg; Rochcongar, Pierre; Ferret, JM et al

in Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

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See detailApproche préventive de la lésion d'épaule chez le sportif
Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg; Gleizes-Cervera, S; Delvaux, François ULg et al

in Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

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See detailL'équilibre de force musculaire agonistes / antagonistes
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Delvaux, François ULg; Kaux, Jean-François ULg et al

in Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

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See detailAspects spécifiques des démarches préventives chez le jeune sportif
Frisch, Anne; Theisen, Daniel; Krecké, Roland et al

in Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

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See detailFacteurs de risque : composantes extrinsèques et intrinsèques
Theisen, Daniel; Frisch, Anne; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

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See detailL'apport de l'analyse biomécanique 3-D dans les stratégies préventives à partir de 2 exemples
Schwartz, Cédric ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Tubez, François ULg et al

in Julia, M; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Perrey, S (Eds.) et al Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques chez le sportif (2013)

De nouveaux outils de mesure permettent de quantifier la cinématique et la dynamique articulaire fonctionnelle des athlètes (systèmes optoélectroniques 3D, plateforme de forces, électromyographie, …). Ces ... [more ▼]

De nouveaux outils de mesure permettent de quantifier la cinématique et la dynamique articulaire fonctionnelle des athlètes (systèmes optoélectroniques 3D, plateforme de forces, électromyographie, …). Ces données sont importantes dans le sens où elles donnent à l’équipe médicale et sportive des informations objectives sur le geste du sportif dans sa pratique réelle. Elles favorisent la compréhension et l’amélioration de la performance ainsi que la prévention lésionnelle et la détection de situations à risque. Dans le cadre d’un suivi longitudinal des sportifs, ces mesures sont intéressantes pour mettre en place des critères objectifs et spécifiques à l’athlète de retour sur le terrain après une blessure. Ce document a pour objectif de présenter les principaux outils disponibles dans les laboratoires de biomécanique et d’illustrer leurs utilisations à travers 2 exemples : l’influence de la raideur de l’épaule sur la mobilité de l’épaule et l’analyse cinématique du service au tennis. [less ▲]

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See detailEccentric training improves tendon biomechanical properties: a rat model
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg; Libertiaux, Vincent et al

in Journal of Orthopaedic Research (2013), 31(1), 119-124

Introduction: The treatment of choice for tendinopathies is eccentric reeducation. Although the clinical results appear favourable, the biomechanical changes to the tissue are not yet clear. Even if the ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The treatment of choice for tendinopathies is eccentric reeducation. Although the clinical results appear favourable, the biomechanical changes to the tissue are not yet clear. Even if the mechanotransduction theory is commonly accepted, the physiology of tendons is not clearly understood. We aimed to better define the biomechanical and histological changes that affect healthy tendon after eccentric and concentric training. Materiel and Methods: This study compared the effects of 2 methods of training (eccentric (E) training and concentric (C) training) with untrained (U) rats. The animals were trained over a period of 5 weeks. The tricipital, patellar and Achilles tendons were removed, measured and a tensile test until failure was performed. A histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome stains) was also realized. Results: There was a significant increase in the rupture force of the patellar and tricipital tendons between the U and E groups. The tricipital tendons in the control group presented a significantly smaller cross-sectional area than the E- and C-trained groups, but none was constated between E and C groups. No significant difference was observed for the mechanical stress between the three groups for all three tendons. Histological studies demonstrated the development of a greater number of blood vessels and a larger quantity of collagen in the E group. Discussion and conclusion: The mechanical properties of tendons in rats improve after specific training, especially following eccentric training. Our results partly explained how mechanical loading, especially in eccentric mode, could improve the healing of tendon. [less ▲]

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See detailAlgofunctional status in Belgian women one year after completion of therapy for breast cancer
DESSALLE, Marguerite ULg; MICHALET, A; BOURSE, Julie ULg et al

in Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (2013), 56S

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