References of "Coucke, Philippe"
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See detailWhen thyroid cell meet colon cells: the history of a tumor collision resulting in coexistence
Bosman, F-T; Jeanneret, W; Monney, M et al

Conference (1998)

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See detail(E)-2'-Deoxy-2'-(Fluoromethylene)cytidine potentiates radioresponse of two human solid tumor xenografts.
Sun, L-Q; Li, Y-X; Guillou, L et al

in Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer Research (1998)

Antitumor and radiosensitizing effects of (E)-2'-deoxy-2'-(fluoromethylene) cytidine (FMdC), a novel inhibitor of ribonucleotide reducÃase, were evaluated on nude mice bearing s.c. human C33-A cervix ... [more ▼]

Antitumor and radiosensitizing effects of (E)-2'-deoxy-2'-(fluoromethylene) cytidine (FMdC), a novel inhibitor of ribonucleotide reducÃase, were evaluated on nude mice bearing s.c. human C33-A cervix cancer and I -H7 MG glioblastoma xenografts. FMdC given once daily has a dosedependent antitumor effect. The maximum tolerated dose in the mice was reached with 10 daily i.p. administrations of 10 mg/kg over 12 days. In the case of radiotherapy (RT) alone (10 fractions over 12 days), the radiation dose required to produce local tumor control in 50% of the treated C33-A xenografts was 51.0 Gy. When combined with FMdC, the radiation dose required to produce local tumor control was reduced to 41.4 and 38.2 Gy, at respective doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg given i.p. l h before each irradiation. The corresponding enhancement ratios (ERs) were 1.2 and 1.3, respec tively. In U-87 MG xenografts, when 5-20 mg/kg FMdC combined with 30 or 40 Gy of RT, the combination treatment produced a significantly increased growth delay as compared with RT alone (P £0.002). The ERs of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg FMdC at a dose of 30 Gy were 2.0, 1.4, and 1.8, respectively. At the 40-Gy level, ERs of 10 and 20 mg/kg FMdC were 1.4 and 1.7. When FMdC was combined with 50 Gy of RT, an increased long-term remission rate of 80-88.9% was observed, as compared with 25% for RT alone (P <0.05). FMdC produced moderate myelosuppression in the mice bearing cervix cancer, whereas leukocytosis occurred in the mice bearing glioblastoma at a low dose. Slightly increased skin toxicity (only with U-87 MG tumor) was observed, as compared with RT alone. In conclusion, FMdC is a potent cytotoxic agent and able to modify the radiation response of C33-A and U-87 MG xenografts. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of pentoxifylline on radiation-induced G2-phase delay and radiosensitivity of human colon and cervical cancer cells.
Li, Y-X; Weber-Johnson, K; Sun, L-Q et al

in Radiation Research (1998), 149(4),

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See detailPrimary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the nasal cavity: prognostic significance of paranasal extension and role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy
Li, Y-X; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Li, J-Y et al

in International Journal of Gynecological Cancer : Official Journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society (1998), 83(3), 449-456

BACKGROUND. This study was conducted to determine whether the paranasal extension of a primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) of the nasal cavity has any deleterious effect on patient outcome. METHODS. One ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND. This study was conducted to determine whether the paranasal extension of a primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) of the nasal cavity has any deleterious effect on patient outcome. METHODS. One hundred and seventy-five patients with previously untreated nasal NHL were reviewed. There were 2 with low grade, 107 with intermediate grade, 17 with high grade, and 49 with unclassifiable lymphomas. In 48 cases the immunophenotype was available and 46 were T-cell lymphoma. According to the Ann Arbor system, there were 133 patients with Stage IE, 28 with Stage IIE, 4 with Stage IIIE, and 10 with Stage IVE lymphomas. Stage IE was subdivided into limited Stage IE (i.e., confined to the nasal cavity [67 patients]) or extensive Stage IE (i.e., presenting with extension beyond the nasal cavity [66 patients]). For patients with limited Stage IE disease the treatment of choice was radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. In patients with extensive Stage IE disease, treatment was comprised of a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. For patients with a more advanced stage of disease (IIE–IVE), chemotherapy was an integral part of the treatment and was completed by irradiation, especially for patients with Stage IIE disease. RESULTS. The actuarial overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) rates at 5 years for the whole group were 65% and 57%, respectively. The 5-year OS and DFS rates were influenced by stage, with a gradual decrease from 75% and 68% for Stage IE disease to 35% and 28% for Stage IIE disease, and 31% and 19% for Stage IIIE/IVE disease. Patients with limited Stage IE disease survived significantly longer (90% 5-year OS) compared with those with extensive Stage IE disease (57% 5-year OS; P , 0.001). For 67 patients with limited Stage IE disease, the 5-year OS was 89% with radiotherapy alone and 92% with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, whereas for 66 patients with extensive Stage IE disease, the 5-year OS was 54% with radiotherapy and 58% with combined modality therapy or chemotherapy (P . 0.05). CONCLUSIONS. The prognosis of patients with primary NHL of the nasal cavity is stage dependent. In this large cohort of Stage IE patients, it was demonstrated that the paranasal local extension was a significant prognostic factor associated with poorer treatment outcome. The authors believe that Ann Arbor Stage IE should be subclassified further into limited and extensive Stage IE. The addition of chemotherapy did not appear to modify significantly the survival of patients with either limited or extensive Stage IE disease. The extranodal progression observed in patients with extensive Stage IE and Stage IIE-IVE disease clearly illustrates the need for improvement of systemic treatment. Cancer 1998;83:449–56. [less ▲]

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See detailFocalized external radiotherapy for resected solitary brain metastasis: the dogma stands
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Zouhair, A; Ozsahin, M et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1998), 47

Abstract Purpose: To investigate whether whole brain irradiation might be replaced by focalized irradiation after resection of a single brain metastasis in patients where extracranial tumor control is ... [more ▼]

Abstract Purpose: To investigate whether whole brain irradiation might be replaced by focalized irradiation after resection of a single brain metastasis in patients where extracranial tumor control is deemed to be obtained. Patients and methods: Twelve patients were introduced in a phase I/II prospective study of conformal postoperative external irradiation after resection of a solitary brain metastasis. The radiation treatment consisted of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction, five fractions per week). The planning target volume consisted of the tumor bed and a 2 cm safety margin. All treatments were optimized with head immobilization, dedicated tomodensitometry and computer assisted three-dimensional treatment planning. Results: The median survival was 7.2 months (range 2.4–50.4 months). Eleven of the 12 patients died. Eight of the 12 patients presented intracranial recurrence and seven died as a consequence of intracranial tumor progression. Conclusions: Focalized external irradiation cannot serve as a reasonable alternative to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) even for patients with apparently one single resected brain metastasis. The dogma of ‘one metastasis=multiple metastases' seems to be confirmed. [less ▲]

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See detailRadiotherapy of choroidal metastases.
Rosset, A; Zografos, L; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1998), 46(3), 263-268

Abstract Purpose: This retrospective study was undertaken to clarify the role of high energy external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and to determine its safety and efficacy on local control and visual ... [more ▼]

Abstract Purpose: This retrospective study was undertaken to clarify the role of high energy external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and to determine its safety and efficacy on local control and visual acuity in patients suffering from choroidal metastases (CM). Materials and methods: The records of 58 consecutive patients treated with EBRT between 1970 and 1993 were analyzed. The female to male ratio was 2.9 and the median age was 59 years (range 40–81 years). Thirty-six patients (62%) had unilateral CM and 22 patients had bilateral CM. The mean number of lesions per eye was two. Retinal detachment was present in 65% of cases. The primary tumour (PT) was breast carcinoma for 38 patients (75%), lung carcinoma for 10 patients (17%) and gastrointestinal, genitourinary or unknown PT for the remaining 10 patients. The median interval of time between the PT and the CM was 55 months (range 0–228 months). All patients were treated with megavoltage irradiation. The median prescribed dose was 35.5 Gy (range 20–53 Gy) normalized at a 2 Gy per fraction schedule with an a/b value of 10 Gy. Various techniques were used and whenever possible the lens was spared. Ten patients with unilateral disease were treated in both eyes. Results: The tumour response was slow. When assessed after 3 months or more, the complete response rate was 53% with significantly better results for doses higher than 35.5 Gy (72 versus 33%; P = 0.009). Visual acuity was improved or stabilized in 62% of patients, with also significantly better results when doses higher than 35.5 Gy (P = 0.014) were administered. Amongst 26 patients with unilateral CM who had no elective contralateral irradiation, three developed metastasis in the opposite eye versus none of the 10 patients who had bilateral irradiation. Five complications occurred (three cataracts, one retinopathy and one glaucoma). Conclusion: Radiation therapy is an efficient and safe palliative treatment for choroidal metastases and it helps the preservation of vision. Thus, there is a major impact on the quality of life in a group of patients with an almost uniformly fatal prognosis. Both tumour response and visual acuity are significantly improved if doses higher than 35.5 Gy are administered. Whenever possible, a lens sparing technique should be used. Ó 1998 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailLes chimioradiothérapies dans les cancers du col utérin
Maingon, P; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Haie-Meder, C et al

in Cancer Radiotherapie (1998), 2

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See detailSilicone tissue-expander prosthesis (STEP) to protect the small bowel during radiation therapy for uterine malignancies.
Zouhair, A; Delaloye, J-F; Ozsahin, M et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1998), 48(Supp1), 103

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See detailLes associations radiochimiothérapiques dans les cancers du col utérin.
Maingon, Philippe; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Haie-Meder, Catherine et al

in Cancer Radiotherapie (1998), 2

Le traitement des cancers du col utérin repose sur la radiothérapie et la chirurgie. Le pronostic des formes évoluées a conduit à proposer différentes modalités d’association dont seuls les traitements ... [more ▼]

Le traitement des cancers du col utérin repose sur la radiothérapie et la chirurgie. Le pronostic des formes évoluées a conduit à proposer différentes modalités d’association dont seuls les traitements concomitants ont montré un intérêt. Les associations de radiothérapie et d’un radiosensibilisant n’ont pas apporté, de bénéfice, voire abouti à des résultats inférieurs à ceux de l’irradiation exclusive. L’Hydroxyurée et la Mitomycine C ont été largement testées, seules ou en association, sans qu’elles puissent être retenues comme efficaces. Des associations modernes et des essais récents, il peut être établi que seul le Cisplatine (et peut-être ses dérivés) peut être retenu dans !es propositions thérapeutiques futures. 1998 Elsevier, Paris [less ▲]

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See detailAltered apoptotic profiles in irradiated patients with increased toxicity
Ozsahin, Mahmut; Miralbell, Raymond; Emery, Gillian et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1998), 42(Supplément), 135

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See detailCurrative radiotherapy for early stage laryngeal carcinoma: results and technical considerations
Ozsahin; Zouhair; Rosset et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1998), 48(Supp1), 27

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See detailhyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) immediately followed by surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Bouzourenne, Hanifa; Zouhair, Abderrahim et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1998), 48(Supp1), 73

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See detailAltered apoptotic profiles in irradiated patients with incrased toxicity
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Ozsahin; Mirabell et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1998), 48(1), 45

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See detailStereotactic radiation therapy for brain metastases: the Lausanne experience
Zouhair, Abderrahim; Tercier, Nicolas; Fankhauser, Heinz et al

in Bulletin du Cancer. Radiothérapie : Journal de la Société Française du Cancer : Organe de la Société Française de Radiothérapie Oncologique (1997)

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See detailSeminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism: Treatment and prognosis in 66 patients
Li; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Tu-Nan, Qian et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1997), 38(2), 343-350

Image : The purpose of this study was to analyze prognosis and treatment results for seminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism (SCIC and SUIC). Image : We reviewed 66 patients ... [more ▼]

Image : The purpose of this study was to analyze prognosis and treatment results for seminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism (SCIC and SUIC). Image : We reviewed 66 patients with inguinal seminomas between June 1958 and December 1991 at the Cancer Hospital and Institute of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. Of these patients, 23 had prior orchiopexy and 43 presented with an inguinal form of cryptorchidism. At presentation, 17 of 66 (26%) patients had nodal metastases. This nodal involvement was 30% (7 of 23) for SCIC and 23% (10 of 43) for SUIC, respectively. These numbers are comparable with those in a series of patients treated for scrotal seminoma at our institution (26% vs. 20%). However, 3 of 23 (13%) patients who had prior orchiopexy presented with inguinal nodal metastasis as compared with 0 of 43 patients with SUIC or 4 of 237 patients with scrotal seminoma (p < 0.5). There were 49 stage I, 5 stage IIA, 8 stage IIB, 3 stage III, and 1 stage IV patients. All patients underwent radical orchiectomy and received further radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or both. Patients with stage I and stage II disease were treated primarily with radiotherapy, whereas patients with stage III and IV disease were treated with chemotherapy. Image : The overall and disease-free survival at 5 and 10 years was 94% and 92%, 89% and 87%, respectively. The overall 5- and 10-year survival by stage was 100% and 100% for stage I, and 77% and 68% for stage II, respectively (p < .05). There was no significant difference in survival between SUIC and SCIC (93% vs. 96% at 5 years). Four patients developed relapse. Two of these four patients experienced relapse at the inguinal area, due to a marginal miss. Three of four patients with relapse were successfully salvaged, and one died of disease. Image : Our results indicate that prognosis for inguinal seminoma is excellent and similar to that of scrotal seminoma. Postorchiectomy radiotherapy can be considered as the standard treatment for stage I and IIA inguinal seminoma. We recommend routinely including the para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodes. [less ▲]

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See detailCytotoxic interactions of 5-fluorouracil and nucleoside analogues in vitro
Li, Y-X; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Paschoud, N et al

in Anticancer Research (1997), 17(1A), 21-27

The cytotoxic interaction of combined 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with different nucleoside analogues was investigated in vitro on a colon (WiDr) and a breast (MCF-7) cancer cell line. Azidothymidine (AZT), 3 ... [more ▼]

The cytotoxic interaction of combined 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with different nucleoside analogues was investigated in vitro on a colon (WiDr) and a breast (MCF-7) cancer cell line. Azidothymidine (AZT), 3'-deoxy-2', 3'-didehydrothymidine (D4T), 5-iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (DDC) were tested at different concentrations (5-600 microM) as modulators of 5-FU. The experimental endpoints were cellular viability and cell cycle distribution. The combination of 5-FU and AZT or D4T yielded supra-additive cytotoxic effects in both cell lines at all concentrations. On WiDr, IdUrd at high concentrations of 50 and 100 microM showed a supra-additive effect whereas at low concentrations (5, 10 and 20 microM) the effect was antagonistic. 5-FU combined with IdUrd produced a synergistic effect on MCF-7 cells at all concentrations. DDC antagonised the toxic effect of 5-FU on the WiDr cell line. In WiDr cells, a significant increase in the overall S-phase was observed 48 and 72 hours after exposure to D4T, AZT and DDC at the low concentration of 10 microM. On the contrary, this accumulation in S-phase was not present in MCF-7 cells. The combined effect of 5-FU and nucleoside analogues in vitro is dependent on the type and concentration of nucleosides and the cell-line tested. AZT, D4T and IdUrd are more likely to be subjected to more intensive in vitro and in vivo research as far as modulation of 5-FU toxicity is concerned. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of the radiosensitizing effect of (E)-24-deoxy-(fluoromethylene)cytidine (FMdC)by thymide analogues AZT, D4T and idUrd.
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Cottin, E; Li, Y-X et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1997), 43(supp 2), 13

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See detailEffect of neuropeptides on cultured postnatal auditory neurons.
Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Lefebvre, P.P.; Rigo, J.M. et al

Conference (1997)

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See detailPredicting response in head and neck cancer: The search for the holy grall
COUCKE, Philippe ULg

in European Journal of Cancer (1997), 33(supp 8), 289-290

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