References of "Coucke, Philippe"
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See detailRadiothérapie vasculaire : un nouveau standard
Coucke, Philippe ULg; HU PHUOC DO; URBAN, Ph. et al

in Médecine et Hygiène (2001), 59(2342), 853-858

Le traitement des maladies cardiovasculalres, et plus spécifiquement la prise en charge des patients avec des sténoses vasculalres, qu'elles soient cardiaques ou périphériques, est en train d'être modifié ... [more ▼]

Le traitement des maladies cardiovasculalres, et plus spécifiquement la prise en charge des patients avec des sténoses vasculalres, qu'elles soient cardiaques ou périphériques, est en train d'être modifié de façon radicale. Avec l'Introduction des techniques d'angioplastie par vole transcutanée (PTCA) et la mise en place de « stents », on a certainement amélioré le devenir de ces malades. Toutefois, l'incidence de resténose après ces interventions endovasculaires reste élevée. Ce phénomène d'oblitération vasculaire après angloplastie ou stent s'explique en partie par des mécanismes de prolifération néointimale. On s'est donc logiquement tourné vers les radiations ionisantes comme alternative thérapeutique possible vu leur efficacité sur les processus de prolifération cellulaire, Autant pour les lésions de novo que les resténoses in-stent, on observe l'efficacité des radiations ionisantes. Les résultats des premiers essais randomisés ont été rendus publics et ceci va certainement changer les standards de prise en charge en cardiologie interventionnelle. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung Investigators Workshop participants (P.A Coucke) and N. Coleman : Radiation Research program, Radiation Oncology Sciences Program, National Cancer Institue, Nih, August 1-2, 2000
Coucke, Philippe ULg

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2001), 49(5), 1505-1516

INTRODUCTION The one-and-a-half day Young Investigators Workshop was held in the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, August 1–2, 2000. Using the SCAROP mailing list and recommendations from department chiefs ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION The one-and-a-half day Young Investigators Workshop was held in the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, August 1–2, 2000. Using the SCAROP mailing list and recommendations from department chiefs, approximately 55 “early-career” physicianscientists were invited to attend the workshop. Table 1 includes the participants. The goals of the meeting were: c To bring together radiation oncology physician-scientists who were in the early part of their career to discuss research ideas and opportunities as well as potential barriers to progress for the field and for young-investigator careers. c To help develop camaraderie among and a critical-mass of a new generation of physician-scientists with interests ranging from technology development, to basic and translational research, to outcomes research and analysis. c To help the young investigators gain familiarity with the NIH grant programs. c To prepare a “white paper” with their vision and ideas for potential opportunities for the future. If possible, a shortand long-term agenda were to be proposed. The first morning included presentations from a variety of NCI programs. Three breakout sessions were held in the afternoon. Breakout Group Reports were discussed by the entire group the following morning. A fourth discussion topic on “Barriers To a Successful Research Career” was conducted by the entire group. Drafts of this entire Workshop Report were circulated to the participants. The final document represents the efforts of the entire Young Investigators Workshop and provides the perspective from the point of view of the investigators who have many years to invest in the future of radiation oncology. The Radiation Research Program (RRP) is grateful to all the participants for a lively workshop and to the session co-chairs for the timely preparation of this report. [less ▲]

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See detailRadiation therapy alone or combined surgery and radiation therapy in squamous-cell carcinoma of the penis?
Zouhair, A; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Jeanneret, W et al

in European Journal of Cancer (2000), 37(2), 198203

To assess the prognostic factors and the outcome in patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the penis, a retrospective review of 41 consecutive patients with non-metastatic invasive carcinoma of the ... [more ▼]

To assess the prognostic factors and the outcome in patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the penis, a retrospective review of 41 consecutive patients with non-metastatic invasive carcinoma of the penis, treated between 1962 and 1994, was performed. The median age was 59 years (range: 35–76 years). According to the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) 1997 classification, there were 12 (29%) T1, 24 (59%) T2, 4 (10%) T3 and 1 TX (2%) tumours. The N-classification was distributed as follows: 29 (71%) patients with N0, 8 (20%) with N1, 3 (7%) with N2 and 1 (2%) with N3. Forty-four per cent (n=18) of the patients underwent surgery: partial penectomy with (n=4) or without (n=12) lymph node dissection, or total penectomy with (n=1) or without (n=1) lymph node dissection. 23 patients were treated with radiation therapy alone, and all but 4 of the patients who were operated upon received postoperative radiation therapy (n=14). The median follow-up period was 70 months (range 20–331 months). In a median period of 12 months (range 5–139 months), 63% (n=26) of the patients relapsed (local in 18, locoregional in 2, regional in 3 and distant in 3). Local failure (stump in the operated patients, and the tumour bed in those treated with primary radiation therapy) was observed in 4 out of 16 (25%) patients treated with partial penectomy ±postoperative radiotherapy versus 14 out of 23 (61%) treated with primary radiotherapy (P=0.06). 15 (83%) out of 18 local failures were successfully salvaged with surgery. In all patients, 5- and 10-year survival rates were 57% (95% confidence interval (CI), 41–73%) and 38% (95% CI, 21–55%), respectively. The 5-year local and locoregional rates were 57% (95% CI, 41–73%) and 48% (95% CI, 32–64%), respectively. In patients treated with primary radiotherapy, 5- and 10-year probabilities of surviving with penis preservation were 36% (95% CI, 22–50%) and 18% (95% CI, 2–34%), respectively. In multivariate analyses, survival was significantly influenced by the N-classification, and surgery was the only independent factor predicting the locoregional control. We conclude that, in patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the penis, local control is better in patients treated with surgery. However, there seems to be no difference in terms of survival between patients treated by surgery and those treated by primary radiotherapy ±salvage surgery, with 39% having organ preservation. [less ▲]

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See detailessai de phase II: radiothérapie accélérée préopératoire pour cancers du rectum localement avancés
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Bouzourene, H; Gillet, M

in Cancer Radiotherapie (2000), 4(1), 204

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See detailPathology and outcome after HART
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Bouzourene, H

in Strahlentherapie und Onkologie (2000)

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See detailLa resténose in-stent: la solution radiothérapeutique
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Pica, A; Latchem, D et al

in Cancer Radiotherapie (2000), 4(1), 199

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See detailCombination of FMdC, Tirapazamine (SR4233) and irradiation in vitro
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Cottin, E; Stern, S et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2000), 46(3),

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See detailIn vitro modulation of radiosenitizing effect of FMdC. The importance of simultaneous alteration of the novo and salvage pathways to deoxyribonucleosides.
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Cottin, E; Ciernick, I-F et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2000), 46(3),

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See detailFMdC +/- Tirapazamine (SR4233) and irradiation
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Cottin, E; Ciernik, I-F et al

in Strahlentherapie und Onkologie (2000)

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See detailRadiosurgery with Linac and Micro Multi-Leaf Collimator (mMLC)
Villemure, J-G; Pica, A; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in European Journal of Neurology (2000), 142(10), 1188

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See detailBeta-radiation for coronary in-stent restenosis
Latchem, D-R; Urban, P; Goy, JJ et al

in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions (2000), 51(4), 422-429

To determine the feasibility and safety of an intracoronary beta-radiation device in preventing the recurrence of in-stent restenosis (ISR) after successful angioplasty, we studied 37 patients treated ... [more ▼]

To determine the feasibility and safety of an intracoronary beta-radiation device in preventing the recurrence of in-stent restenosis (ISR) after successful angioplasty, we studied 37 patients treated with beta-radiation (30-mm strontium-90 source) after angioplasty. The mean reference diameter was 2.9 ± 0.5 mm, and 62% of lesions were diffuse, including four total occlusions. Beta-radiation was successfully delivered in 36 of 37 (97%) cases. Over the course of 7.1 ± 4.5 mo follow-up, there were no myocardial infarctions and three deaths: one from preexisting malignancy, one from progressive cardiac failure, and one from sudden cardiac death. Target vessel revascularization (TVR) was performed in seven of 36 (19%) patients. Thirty patients underwent angiography at 6 mo; three (10%) experienced restenosis (diameter stenosis > 50%) at the target site, four (13%) had edge stenoses, and two (7%) had late (> 1 mo) thrombotic occlusions. Beta-radiation for ISR is associated with encouragingly low rates of target lesion restenosis and TVR. Further improvements are needed to solve the limitations of the edge effect and late occlusion. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of grade on disease-free survival and overall survival in FIGO Stage I adenocarcinoma of the endometrium.
Delaloye, J-F; Pampallona, S; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology & Reproductive Biology (2000), 88

Abstract Objective : To analyse the effect of differentiation on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with stage I adenocarcinoma of the endometrium. Patients and methods ... [more ▼]

Abstract Objective : To analyse the effect of differentiation on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with stage I adenocarcinoma of the endometrium. Patients and methods : From 1979 to 1995, 350 patients with FIGO stage IA–IC with well (G1), moderately (G2) or poorly (G3) differentiated tumors were treated with surgery and high dose-rate brachytherapy with or without external radiation. Median age was 65 years (39–86 years). Results : The 5-year DFS was 8863% for the G1 tumors, 7764% for the G2 tumors, and 6767% for the G3 tumors (P50.0049). With regard to the events contributing to DFS, the 5-year cumulative percentage of local relapse was 4.6% for the G1 tumors, 9.0% for the G2 tumors, and 4.6% (P50.027) for the G3 tumors. Cumulative percentage of metastasis was 1.4, 6.3 and 7.2% (P,0.001), respectively, whereas percentages of death were 6.0, 7.9 and 20.7% (P,0.001). The 5-year OS was 9163, 8364 and 7667%, respectively (P50.0018). In terms of multivariate hazard ratios (HR), the relative differences between the three differentiation groups correspond to an increase of 77% of the risk of occurrence of either of the three events considered for the DFS (HR51.77, 95% Cl [0.94–3.33]), (P50.078) for the G2 tumors and of 163% (HR52.63, 95% Cl [1.27–5.43]), (P50.009) for the G3 tumors with respect to the G1 tumors. The estimated relative hazards for OS are, respectively, in line with those for DFS: HR51.51 (P50.282) for the G2 tumors; and HR53.37 (P50.003) for the G3 tumors. Conclusion : Patients with grade 1 tumors are those least exposed to either local relapse, metastasis, or death. In contrast patients with grade 2 tumors seem to be at higher risk of metastasis, whereas patients with grade 3 tumors appear at higher risk of death. Since we have looked at the first of three competing events (local relapse, metastasis and death), this suggests that patients with grade 3 tumors probably progress to death so fast that local relapse, if any, cannot be observed. Ó 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailA survey on staging and treatment in uterine cervical carcinoma in the Radiotherapy Cooperative Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Maingon, P; Ciernik, I et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2000), 54

Abstract Background: The treatment outcome of advanced stage uterine cervical carcinoma remains unsatisfactory. In order to elaborate a novel trial within The Radiotherapy Cooperative Group (RCG) of the ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: The treatment outcome of advanced stage uterine cervical carcinoma remains unsatisfactory. In order to elaborate a novel trial within The Radiotherapy Cooperative Group (RCG) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), we conducted a survey in 1997±1998 to determine the variability of pre-treatment assessment and treatment options. The variability of choosing surgery, de®ned radiation therapy techniques and chemotherapy are investigated, as well as the center's choices of future treatment strategies. Methods: Fifty two of 81 RCG centers from the RCG have participated in the survey. As one would expect, there is a large variation in the techniques used for pretreatment evaluation and treatment options. There is no `standard' for reporting acute and late side effects. Chemotherapy is used neither systematically nor uniformly, and some centers continue to use neadjuvant chemotherapy modalities. Results: Furthermore, the survey reveals that there is a strong demand for the reduction of overall treatment-time, for clinical investigation of novel combined modality treatment strategies, especially chemo±radiation therapy, and also for the use of new radiation sensitizers. Conclusion:We conclude that a more homogeneous approach to the pretreatment evaluation as well as treatment techniques is required in order to allow adequate quality control in any future trial of the RCG in the EORTC.q2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailBasic rules of dosimetry in endovascular brachytherapy.
Coucke, Philippe ULg; PHUOC DO, Hu; Pica, Alessia et al

in Journal of Interventional Cardiology (2000), 13(6), 425-429

Endovascular brachytherapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), is becoming a standard approach for the treatment and prevention of restenosis. A variety of technical approaches are currently ... [more ▼]

Endovascular brachytherapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), is becoming a standard approach for the treatment and prevention of restenosis. A variety of technical approaches are currently available to deliver ionizing irradiation to the vascular target. Basically two kinds of radioactive isotopes are available that emit gamma radiation (photons) or beta radiation (electrons). The pitfalls and solutions for the optimization of dosimetry are discussed. As might be expected, the inhomogeneous dose distribution across the target volume results in recurrence by underdosage or in complications because of overdosage. Moreover, uniformization of the target definition and reporting of the dose distribution in endovascular brachytherapy is a prerequisite for comparison between the results of the various clinical trials and is absolutely necessary to improve the therapeutic efficacy of this new approach in the prevention of restenosis after coronary angioplasty with or without stenting. (J Interven Cardiol2000; 13:425430) [less ▲]

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See detailLymphocyte apoptosis assay: an interlaboraty comparison
Mirimanoff; Bodis; Bernier et al

Scientific conference (1999, March 04)

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See detailCongrès SASRO 1999
COUCKE, Philippe ULg

in Strahlentherapie und Onkologie (1999, March)

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See detailoncologie gastro-intestinale
Frei, A.; Coucke, Philippe ULg; Felley, C. et al

in Revue Médicale Suisse (1999), 760

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See detailAltered apoptotic profiles in irradiated patients with increased toxicity.
Crompton, Nigel; Miralbell, Raymond; Rutz, Hans-Peter et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1999), 45(3), 707-714

Purpose: A retrospective study of radiation-induced apoptosis in CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes, from 12 cancer patients who displayed enhanced toxicity to radiation therapy and 9 ataxia telangiectasia ... [more ▼]

Purpose: A retrospective study of radiation-induced apoptosis in CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes, from 12 cancer patients who displayed enhanced toxicity to radiation therapy and 9 ataxia telangiectasia patients, was performed to test for altered response compared to healthy blood-donors and normal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Three milliliters of heparinized blood from each donor was sent via express post to the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) for subsequent examination. The blood was diluted 1:10 in RPMI medium, irradiated with 0-, 2-, or 9-Gy X-rays, and incubated for 48 h. CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes were then labeled using FITC-conjugated antibodies, erythrocytes were lysed, and the DNA stained with propidium iodide. Subsequently, cells were analyzed using a Becton Dickinson FACScan flow cytometer. Radiation-induced apoptosis was recognized in leukocytes as reduced DNA content attributed to apoptosis-associated changes in chromatin structure. Apoptosis was confirmed by light microscopy, electron microscopy, and by the use of commercially available apoptosis detection kits (in situ nick translation and Annexin V). Data from hypersensitive individuals were compared to a standard database of 105 healthy blood-donors, and a database of 48 cancer patient blood donors who displayed normal toxicity to radiation therapy. To integrate radiosensitivity results from CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes after 2 and 9 Gy, z-score analyses were performed. Results: A cohort of 12 hypersensitive patients was evaluated; 8 showed enhanced early toxicity, 3 showed enhanced late toxicity, and 1 showed both. The cohort displayed less radiation-induced apoptosis (21.8 s) than average age-matched donors. A cohort of 9 ataxia telangiectasia homozygotes displayed even less apoptosis (23.6 s). Conclusion: The leukocyte apoptosis assay appears to be a useful predictor of individuals likely to display increased toxicity to radiation therapy; however, validation of this requires a prospective study. © 1999 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailPrognostic Factors in Urothelial Renal Pelvis and Ureter Tumours: a Multicentre Rare Cancer Network Study
Ozsahin, M; Zouhair, A; Villa, S et al

in European Journal of Cancer & Clinical Oncology (1999), 35/5

To assess the prognostic factors in patients with transitional-cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis and/or ureter, a series of 138 patients with transitional-cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis and/or ureter ... [more ▼]

To assess the prognostic factors in patients with transitional-cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis and/or ureter, a series of 138 patients with transitional-cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis and/or ureter was collected in a retrospective multicentre study. 12 patients with distant metastases were excluded from the statistical evaluation. All but 3 patients underwent radical surgery: nephroureterectomy (n=71), nephroureterectomy and lymphadenectomy (n=20), nephroureterectomy and partial bladder resection or transurethral resection (n=20), nephrectomy (n=10), and ureterectomy (n=5). Sixty-one per cent (n=77) of the tumours were located in the renal pelvis, and 21% (n=27) in the ureter (both in 22 [17%]). Following surgery, residual tumour was still present in 33 patients (16 microscopic and 17 macroscopic). Postoperative radiotherapy was given to 45 (36%) patients. The median follow-up period was 39 months. In a median period of 9 months, 66% of the patients relapsed (34 local, 7 locoregional, 16 regional, and 24 distant). The 5- and 10-year survival were 29% and 19%, respectively, in all patients. In univariate analyses, statistically significant factors influencing the outcome were Karnofsky index, pT-classification, pN-classification, tumour localisation, grade, and residual tumour after surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed that independent prognostic factors influencing outcome were pT-classification, the existence of residual tumour, and tumour localisation. In patients with urothelial renal pelvis and/or ureter tumours, a radical surgical attitude is mandatory; and the presence of tumour in the ureter is associated with a poorer prognosis. [less ▲]

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See detailSensitizing human cervical cancer cells in vitro to ionizing radiation with interferon β or γ
Grueninger, L; Cottin, Y-X; Li, Y-X et al

in Radiation Research (1999), 152(5),

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