References of "Coucke, Philippe"
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See detailPreoperative hyperfractionated acclerated radiotherapy (HART) and concomittant CPT-11 in advanced rectal carcinoma. A phase I study.
Voelter, V; Stupp, R; Matter, M et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2003), 56(5), 1288-1294

Purpose: Patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma are at risk for both local recurrence and distant metastases. We demonstrated the efficacy of preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma are at risk for both local recurrence and distant metastases. We demonstrated the efficacy of preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART). In this Phase I trial, we aimed at introducing chemotherapy early in the treatment course with both intrinsic antitumor activity and a radiosensitizer effect. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients (19 males; median age 63, range 28–75) with advanced rectal carcinoma (cT3: 24; cT4: 4; cN : 12; M1: 5) were enrolled, including 8 patients treated at the maximally tolerated dose. Escalating doses of CPT-11 (30–105 mg/m2/week) were given on Days 1, 8, and 15, and concomitant HART (41.6 Gy, 1.6 Gy bid 13 days) started on Day 8. Surgery was to be performed within 1 week after the end of radiochemotherapy. Results: Twenty-six patients completed all preoperative radiochemotherapy as scheduled; all patients underwent surgery. Dose-limiting toxicity was diarrhea Grade 3 occurring at dose level 6 (105 mg/m2). Hematotoxicity was mild, with only 1 patient experiencing Grade 3 neutropenia. Postoperative complications (30 days) occurred in 7 patients, with an anastomotic leak rate of 22%. Conclusions: The recommended Phase II dose of CPT-11 in this setting is 90 mg/m2/week. Further Phase II exploration at this dose is warranted. © 2003 Elsevier Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailRENO, a European Postmarket Surveillance Registry, confirms effectiveness of coronary brachytheraypy in routine clinical practice.
Coen, V; Serruys, P; Sauerwein, W et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2003), 55(4), 1019-1026

Purpose: To assess, by a European registry trial, the clinical event rate in patients with discrete stenotic lesions of coronary arteries (de novo or restenotic) in single or multiple vessels (native or ... [more ▼]

Purpose: To assess, by a European registry trial, the clinical event rate in patients with discrete stenotic lesions of coronary arteries (de novo or restenotic) in single or multiple vessels (native or bypass grafts) treated with -radiation. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and September 2000, 1098 consecutive patients treated in 46 centers in Europe and the Middle East with the Novoste Beta-Cath System were included in Registry Novoste (RENO). Results: Six-month follow-up data were obtained for 1085 patients. Of 1174 target lesions, 94.1% were located in native vessels and 5.9% in a bypass graft; 17.7% were de novo lesions, 4.1% were restenotic, and 77.7% were in-stent restenotic lesions. Intravascular brachytherapy was technically successful in 95.9% of lesions. Multisegmental irradiation, using a manual pullback stepping maneuver to treat longer lesions, was used in 16.3% of the procedures. The in-hospital rate of major adverse cardiac events was 1.8%. At 6 months, the rate was 18.7%. Angiographic follow-up was available for 70.4% of the patients. Nonocclusive restenosis was seen in 18.8% and total occlusion in 5.7% of patients. A combined end point for late (30–180 days) definitive or suspected target vessel closure was reached in 5.4%, but with only 2% of clinical events. Multivariate analysis was performed for major adverse cardiac events and late thrombosis. Conclusion: Data obtained from the multicenter RENO registry study, derived from a large cohort of unselected consecutive patients, suggest that the good results of recent randomized controlled clinical trials can be replicated in routine clinical practice. © 2003 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailPredictive factors in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy.
Bouzourene, H; Bosman, F; Matter, M et al

in Human Pathology (2003), 34(6), 541-548

This study examines the prognostic significance of pathologic factors in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer treated prospectively with preoperative radiotherapy. From 1992 to 1998, 104 ... [more ▼]

This study examines the prognostic significance of pathologic factors in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer treated prospectively with preoperative radiotherapy. From 1992 to 1998, 104 patients with rectal cancer of grades T3 or T4 and any N underwent preoperative radiotherapy followed by surgical resection. Survival curves were estimated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Correlation of outcome with clinicopathologic variables (pathologic tumor and lymph node staging, histology, radial resection margin [RRM], clearance, vessel involvement, and tumor regression grade [TRG], quantitated in 5 grades) was evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards model. None of the patients achieved a histologically confirmed complete pathologic response, but 79% of the patients showed partial tumor regression (TRG2–4) and 21% did not show any tumor regression (TRG5). Among the tumors, 22% were of a mucinous type. The RRM was free of tumor in 76% of the surgical specimens. The median clearance was 2 mm. Vascular invasion was present in 37 cases (36%). In the univariate analysis, lymph node metastases, absence of tumor regression, positive RRM, and vascular invasion were correlated with adverse overall survival and diseasefree survival; absence of tumor regression, positive RRM, and clearance <2 mm were correlated with local recurrences; and advanced pT stage was correlated only with disease-free survival. However, in the multivariate analysis, only lymph node metastases and RRM were independent prognostic factors for overall survival and disease-free survival, and clearance <2 mm was an independent prognostic factor for local control. Pathologic parameters remain strong determinants of local recurrence and survival in locally advanced rectal cancer, treated preoperatively with hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy. We show that patients with advanced pT, positive lymph nodes, vascular invasion, positive RRM, clearance <2 mm, or absence of tumor regression are known to have poor clinical outcome. HUM PATHOL 34:541-548. © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Abbreviations: , computed tomography; DFS, disease-free survival; HART, hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy; OS, overall survival; RRM, radial resection margin; TRG, tumor regression grade. [less ▲]

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See detailShortened irradiation scheme, continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil and fractionation of mitomycin C in locally advanced anal carcinomas. Results of a phase II study of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Radiotherapy and Gastrointestinal Cooperative Groups
Bosset, J. F.; Roelofsen, F.; Morgan, D. A. L. et al

in European Journal of Cancer (2003), 39

Abstract The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 22861 randomised trial established that combined radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for locally advanced anal ... [more ▼]

Abstract The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 22861 randomised trial established that combined radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for locally advanced anal cancer. This EORTC phase II study (#22953) tests the feasibility of reducing the gap between sequences to 2 weeks, to deliver Mitomycin C (MMC) in each radiotherapy sequence and 5-FU continuously during the treatment. The first sequence consisted of 36 Gy over 4 weeks. 5-FU 200 mg/m2/days 1–26, MMC 10 mg/m2/day 1 gap 16 days. Then a second sequence of 23.4 Gy over 17 days, 5-FU 200 mg/m2/days 1–17 and, MMC 10 mg/m2/day 1 was given. 43 patients with a World Health Organization (WHO) status of 0 (n=27) or 1 (n=16) and with T2-T4, N0-3 tumours were included. Compliance with the planned treatment, doses and duration was 93%. The complete response rate was 90.7%. Grade 3 toxicities of 28, 12 and 2% were observed for skin, diarrhoea and haematological toxicities, respectively. The 3-year estimated rates for trials 22861 and 22953 are: 68 and 88% for local control; 72 and 81% for colostomy-free interval, 62 and 84% for severe late toxicity-free interval, and 70 and 81% for survival, respectively. The 22953 scheme is feasible and the results are promising. This is now considered as the new standard scheme by the EORTC. [less ▲]

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See detailProspective studyof CD4 and CD8 T-lynphocyte apoptosis as a marker for radiation induced late effects in 399 individual patients
Ozsahin; Crompton; Shi et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2003), 55(2), 551-552

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See detailAccelerated postoperative radiation therapy with weekly concomitant boost in high risk patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck
Chevalier; Pasche; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2002), 64(supp 1), 248

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See detailDecreased local control following radiation therapy alone in early larynx cancer with anterior commisure extension
Ozsahin; Bron; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2002), 64(supp 1), 243-244

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See detailImportance of Tumor Regression Assessment in Predicting the Outcome in Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Carcinoma Who Are Treated with Preoperative Radiotherapy
Bouzourene, Hanifa; Bosman, Fred; Seelentag, Walter et al

in Cancer (2002), 94(4), 1121-1130

BACKGROUND: Locally advanced rectal carcinoma has a poor prognosis. However, <br />since the introduction of preoperative radiotherapy, the outcome of patients with <br />rectal carcinoma has been ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Locally advanced rectal carcinoma has a poor prognosis. However, <br />since the introduction of preoperative radiotherapy, the outcome of patients with <br />rectal carcinoma has been reported to have improved. Nevertheless, to the authors’ <br />knowledge few data are available regarding the histopathologic response to <br />radiotherapy as assessed on surgical specimens as a potential predictive factor for <br />outcome. <br />METHODS: To estimate the effect of radiotherapy on rectal carcinoma, the authors <br />retrospectively reviewed the surgical specimens of 102 patients with T3-4, N0 or <br /> N1 rectal carcinoma and 1 patient with T2 but N1 rectal carcinoma. All patients <br />were treated preoperatively with a hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy <br />schedule in a prospective protocol (Trial 93-01). Using a standardized approach, <br />tumor regression was graded using a system that varies from Grade 1 (tumor <br />regression Grade [TRG] 1) when complete tumor regression is observed to Grade 5 <br />(TRG5) when no tumor regression is observed. <br />RESULTS: Radiotherapy resulted in tumor downstaging in 43% of the patients. <br />There were 2 pT1 tumors (2%), 21 pT2 tumors (20%), 66 pT3 tumors (64%), and 14 <br />pT4 tumors (14%) after treatment. Regional lymph nodes were involved in 55 <br />patients (53%). None of the patients demonstrated a complete tumor regression <br />after radiotherapy, but in 79% of the specimens a partial tumor regression was <br />observed (TRG1: 0%; TRG2: 20%; TRG3: 39%; TRG4: 20%; and TRG5: 21%). The <br />median actuarial overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 52 <br />months. Actuarial local recurrence rates at 2 years and 5 years were 6.4% and 7.6%, <br />respectively. Univariate analysis showed the actuarial DFS to be significantly lower <br />in patients with lymph node metastases (P 0.0004) and advanced pT stages <br />(pT3-4) (P 0.03). A favorable outcome for OS, DFS, and local control was <br />observed in patients with TRG2-4 (i.e., responders) compared with patients with <br />TRG5 (i.e., nonresponders), but also in patients with low residual tumor cell <br />density (TRG2, 3, and 4). On multivariate analysis, TRG remained an independent <br />prognostic indicator for local tumor control. <br />CONCLUSIONS. Tumor regression as well as residual tumor cell density were found <br />to be predictive factors of survival in rectal carcinoma patients after preoperative <br />radiotherapy. Even after preoperative radiotherapy, the pathologic stage of the <br />surgical specimen remained a prognostic factor. The use of a standardized approach <br />for pathologic evaluation must be implemented to allow comparison between <br />the results of various treatment approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailTumor volume and/orTumor thickness should be considered in TNM classification of rectal tumors
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Zouhair, A; Bouzourene, H et al

Poster (2002)

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See detailRadiation-associated synovial-sarcoma: clinicopathological and molecular analysis of two cases.
Egger, J-F; Coindre, J-M; Benhattar, J et al

in Modern Pathology : An Official Journal of the United States & Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc (2002), 15(9), 998-1004

Development of a soft-tissue sarcoma is an infrequent but well-known long-term complication of radiotherapy. Malignant fibrous histiocytomas, extraskeletal osteosarcomas, fibrosarcomas, malignant ... [more ▼]

Development of a soft-tissue sarcoma is an infrequent but well-known long-term complication of radiotherapy. Malignant fibrous histiocytomas, extraskeletal osteosarcomas, fibrosarcomas, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and angiosarcomas are most frequently encountered. Radiationassociated synovial sarcomas are exceptional. We report the clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of two radiationassociated synovial sarcomas. One tumor developed in a 42-year-old female 17 years after external irradiation was given for breast carcinoma; the other occurred in a 34-year-old female who was irradiated at the age of 7 years for a nonneoplastic condition of the left hand. Both lesions showed morphologic features of monophasic spindle cell synovial sarcoma, were immunoreactive for cytokeratins, epithelial membrane antigen, CD99, CD117 (c-kit), and bcl-2 and bore the t(X;18) (SYT-SSX1) translocation. We conclude that synovial sarcoma has to be added to the list of radiation-associated soft-tissue sarcomas. Mod Pathol 2002;15(9):998–1004 [less ▲]

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See detailRole of methalothionein in irradiated human rectal carcinoma.
Bouzourene, H; Chabert, P; Gebhardt, S et al

in Cancer (2002), 95(5), 1003-1008

BACKGROUND. Metallothioneins (MT) are low-molecular weight, metal-binding proteins that play a role in cellular proliferation and differentiation, as well as in cellular defense mechanisms. They act as ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND. Metallothioneins (MT) are low-molecular weight, metal-binding proteins that play a role in cellular proliferation and differentiation, as well as in cellular defense mechanisms. They act as scavengers of free radicals produced by irradiation. A number of in vitro and in vivo studies have linked overexpression of cellular MT with tumor cell resistance to radiation. This is the first study that investigates whether MT expression is involved in the radioresistance of rectal carcinoma. METHODS. Using a mouse monoclonal antibody, MT expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on surgical samples (n 85) from 85 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma who were treated preoperatively with a hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy schedule and on tumor biopsies (n 13) obtained before treatment. The potential correlations between MT expression and pathologic variables and survival were examined. RESULTS. MT were expressed strongly in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of tumor cells in 7 biopsy and 42 surgical samples. A comparison of MT expression in biopsy and surgical specimens showed that MT expression did not change after irradiation in most cases. Against all expectations, MT were expressed more frequently in tumors from responders than in those from the nonresponders (P 0.02). There was no correlation between MT expression and tumor stage, histology after radiotherapy, or survival. CONCLUSION. These findings do not support the hypothesis that MT overexpression at the end of radiotherapy is a marker for radiation resistance. Cancer 2002;95: 1003–8. © 2002 American Cancer Society. DOI 10.1002/cncr.10780 [less ▲]

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See detailRepeated intracoronary beta radiation for recurrent in-stent restenosis.
De Benedetti, E; Latchem, D; Roguelov, C et al

in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions (2002), 55(2), 233-236

More than 70% of percutaneous coronary interventions are followed by a stent implantation. In-stent restenosis still occurs in 20-30% of patients and remains a therapeutic challenge. At present only ... [more ▼]

More than 70% of percutaneous coronary interventions are followed by a stent implantation. In-stent restenosis still occurs in 20-30% of patients and remains a therapeutic challenge. At present only vascular brachytherapy has been shown to be an effective treatment option. We report here one case of recurrent in-stent restenosis after vascular brachytherapy that was successfully treated by a second beta radiation treatment. Cathet Cardiovasc Intervent 2002;55:233–236. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailRadiothérapie vasculaire : un nouveau standard
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Hu Phuoc, Do; Urban, Ph. et al

in Médecine et Hygiène (2001), (3000),

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See detailFractionated irradiation combined with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide of two human glioblastomas grafted in nude mice
SUN, Lin-Quan; BUCHEGGER, Franz; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in Radiation Research (2001), 155(1),

This study addressed the potential radiosensitizing effect of nicotinamide and/or carbogen on human glioblastoma xenografts in nude mice. U-87MG and LN-Z308 tumors were irradiated with either 20 fractions ... [more ▼]

This study addressed the potential radiosensitizing effect of nicotinamide and/or carbogen on human glioblastoma xenografts in nude mice. U-87MG and LN-Z308 tumors were irradiated with either 20 fractions over 12 days or 5 fractions over 5 days in air-breathing mice, mice injected with nicotinamide, mice breathing carbogen, or mice receiving nicotinamide plus carbogen. The responses to treatment were assessed using local control and moist desquamation. In U-87MG tumors, the enhancement ratios (ERs) at the radiation dose required to produce local tumor control in 50% of the treated mice (TCD50) with nicotinamide and/or carbogen ranged from 1.13 to 1.24 for irradiation in 20 fractions over 12 days. In LN-Z308 tumors, the ERs at the TCD50 with nicotinamide and/or carbogen ranged from 1.22 to 1.40 for irradiation in 5 fractions over 5 days and from 1.11 to 1.30 in 20 fractions over 12 days, respectively. Skin injury was slightly enhanced, with ERs ranged from 1.06 to 1.15 when radiation was combined with carbogen and/or nicotinamide. Thus carbogen and nicotinamide can slightly improve the radiation response of human glioblastoma xenografts. [less ▲]

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See detailDie endoluminale, kardiovaskuläre Radiotherapie:ein neuer Standard
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Ciernik, I-F

in Praxis (2001), 90

The treatment for cardiovascular disease, especially the treatment of coronary stenosis, has been continously improving during the last decades. Routine use of angioplasty was improved by the use of ... [more ▼]

The treatment for cardiovascular disease, especially the treatment of coronary stenosis, has been continously improving during the last decades. Routine use of angioplasty was improved by the use of coronary stenting further reducing cardiac morbidity. However, the incidence of restenosis after cardiovascular angioplasty remains high. The restenosis process is mainly explained by neo-intimal proliferation. Therefore, the utility of ionizing radiation has been systematically investigated in order to reduce proliferation of the neointimal tissue. Radiation therapy turns out to be a very efficient approach in reducing the rate of both de novo lesions as well as of instant restenosis. Recent clinical data from randomized trials confirm the utility of intracoronary radiation therapy and change the treatment standards in interventional cardiology. [less ▲]

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