References of "Cooper, C"
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See detailStrontium ranelate and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) : an update of a retrospective cohort study in the UK general practice research database (GPRD)
Cooper, C; Deltour, N; Speirs, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(S2), 364-365

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See detailEffet structuro-modulateur du ranélate de strontium dans la gonarthrose : l'étude SEKOIA
Chevalier, X; Chapurlat, R; Cooper, C et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2012), 79(S1), 271

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See detailLe ranélate de strontium diminue le nombre de progresseurs radiologiques ou radiocliniques chez les patients ayant une arthrose primaire du genou
Chevalier, X; Chapurlat, R; Cooper, C et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2012), 79(S1), 270

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See detailManagement of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis
Rizzoli, R.; Adachi, J. D.; Cooper, C. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2012), 91(4), 225-243

This review summarizes the available evidence-based data that form the basis for therapeutic intervention and covers the current status of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) management, regulatory ... [more ▼]

This review summarizes the available evidence-based data that form the basis for therapeutic intervention and covers the current status of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) management, regulatory requirements, and risk-assessment options. Glucocorticoids are known to cause bone loss and fractures, yet many patients receiving or initiating glucocorticoid therapy are not appropriately evaluated and treated. An European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis workshop was convened to discuss GIOP management and to provide a report by a panel of experts. An expert panel reviewed the available studies that discussed approved therapeutic agents, focusing on randomized and controlled clinical trials reporting on bone mineral density and/or fracture risk of at least 48 weeks' duration. There is no evidence that GIOP and postmenopausal osteoporosis respond differently to treatments. The FRAX algorithm can be adjusted according to glucocorticoid dose. Available antiosteoporotic therapies such as bisphosphonates and teriparatide are efficacious in GIOP management. Several other agents approved for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis may become available for GIOP. It is advised to stop antiosteoporotic treatment after glucocorticoid cessation, unless the patient remains at increased risk of fracture. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation as an osteoporosis-prevention measure is less effective than specific antiosteoporotic treatment. Fracture end-point studies and additional studies investigating specific subpopulations (pediatric, premenopausal, or elderly patients) would strengthen the evidence base and facilitate the development of intervention thresholds and treatment guidelines. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012. [less ▲]

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See detailStrontium ranelate in knee osteoarthritis trial (SEKOIA) : a structural and symptomatic efficacy
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R; Christiansen, C et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 681

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See detailClinically meaningful effect of strontium ranelate on knee osteoarthritis symptoms
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Bellamy, N; Brown, J et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 110

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See detailEffects of Strontium ranelate on knee osteoarthritis pain : a responder analysis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R; Bellamy, N et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 110

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See detailAntidepressant medications and osteoporosis
Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in BONE (2012), 51

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See detailFrailty and sarcopenia : definitions and outcome parameters
Cooper, C; Dere, W; Evans, W et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012), 23

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See detailEfficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled international trial
Cooper, C; Chapurlat, R; Christiansen, C et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2012), 71(3), 693

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See detailA reappraisal of generic bisphosphonates in osteoporosis.
Kanis, J. A.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, J. M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012), 23

The competitive price of generic bisphosphonates has had a marked effect on practice guidelines, but an increasing body of evidence suggests that they have more limited effectiveness than generally ... [more ▼]

The competitive price of generic bisphosphonates has had a marked effect on practice guidelines, but an increasing body of evidence suggests that they have more limited effectiveness than generally assumed. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study is to review the impact of generic bisphosphonates on effectiveness in the treatment of osteoporosis. METHODS: This study is a literature review. RESULTS: A substantial body of evidence indicates that many generic formulations of alendronate are more poorly tolerated than the proprietary preparations which results in significantly poorer adherence and thus effectiveness. Poorer effectiveness may result from faster disintegration times of many generics that increase the likelihood of adherence of particulate matter to the oesophageal mucosa. Unfortunately, market authorisation, based on the bioequivalence of generics with a proprietary formulation, does not take into account the potential concerns about safety. The poor adherence of many generic products has implications for guideline development, cost-effectiveness and impact of treatment on the burden of disease. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of generic bisphosphonates requires formal testing to re-evaluate their role in the management of osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee ostoarthritis : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled international trial
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(S5), 742-743

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See detailPartial adherence: a new perspective on health economic assessment in osteoporosis.
Kanis, J. A.; Cooper, C.; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(10), 2565-73

Partial adherence in osteoporosis increases the risk for fragility fracture and has considerable impact on cost-effectiveness. This review highlights a number of avenues for further research, such as ... [more ▼]

Partial adherence in osteoporosis increases the risk for fragility fracture and has considerable impact on cost-effectiveness. This review highlights a number of avenues for further research, such as improved definition of thresholds of compliance and persistence, as well as gap length, offset times, and fraction of benefit. INTRODUCTION: A number of economic models have been developed to evaluate osteoporosis therapies and support decisions regarding efficient allocation of health care resources. Adherence to treatment is seldom incorporated in these models, which may reduce their validity for decision-making since adherence is poor in real-world clinical practice. METHODS: An ad hoc working group of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis met to review key issues concerning the incorporation of partial adherence in health economic models. RESULTS: Observational data have shown that poor adherence is associated with an increase in the risk for fragility fracture. Health economic modelling indicates that full adherence is associated with more quality-adjusted life years gained than partial adherence, as well as higher treatment costs and lower fracture-related costs. Although adherence appears as an important driver of cost-effectiveness, the effect is dependent on a range of other variables, such as offset time, fraction of benefit, fracture risk, fracture efficacy, fracture-related costs, and drug cost, some of which are poorly defined. Current models used to evaluate cost-effectiveness in osteoporosis may oversimplify the contributions of compliance and persistence. CONCLUSION: Partial adherence has a significant impact on cost-effectiveness. Further research is required to optimise thresholds of compliance and persistence, the impact of gap length, offset times, and fraction of benefit. [less ▲]

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See detailSubtrochanteric fractures after long-term treatment with bisphosphonates: a European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, and International Osteoporosis Foundation Working Group Report.
Rizzoli, R.; Akesson, K.; Bouxsein, M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22

This paper reviews the evidence for an association between atypical subtrochanteric fractures and long-term bisphosphonate use. Clinical case reports/reviews and case-control studies report this ... [more ▼]

This paper reviews the evidence for an association between atypical subtrochanteric fractures and long-term bisphosphonate use. Clinical case reports/reviews and case-control studies report this association, but retrospective phase III trial analyses show no increased risk. Bisphosphonate use may be associated with atypical subtrochanteric fractures, but the case is yet unproven. INTRODUCTION: A Working Group of the European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the International Osteoporosis Foundation has reviewed the evidence for a causal association between subtrochanteric fractures and long-term treatment with bisphosphonates, with the aim of identifying areas for further research and providing recommendations for physicians. METHODS: A PubMed search of literature from 1994 to May 2010 was performed using key search terms, and articles pertinent to subtrochanteric fractures following bisphosphonate use were analysed. RESULTS: Several clinical case reports and case reviews report a possible association between atypical fractures at the subtrochanteric region of the femur in bisphosphonate-treated patients. Common features of these 'atypical' fractures include prodromal pain, occurrence with minimal/no trauma, a thickened diaphyseal cortex and transverse fracture pattern. Some small case-control studies report the same association, but a large register-based study and retrospective analyses of phase III trials of bisphosphonates do not show an increased risk of subtrochanteric fractures with bisphosphonate use. The number of atypical subtrochanteric fractures in association with bisphosphonates is an estimated one per 1,000 per year. It is recommended that physicians remain vigilant in assessing their patients treated with bisphosphonates for the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis and advise patients of the potential risks. CONCLUSIONS: Bisphosphonate use may be associated with atypical subtrochanteric fractures, but the case is unproven and requires further research. Were the case to be proven, the risk-benefit ratio still remains favourable for use of bisphosphonates to prevent fractures. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoporosis and venous thromboembolism: a retrospective cohort study in the UK General Practice Research Database.
Breart, G.; Cooper, C.; Meyer, O. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010), 21

In a retrospective cohort study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD), there was a greater association of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in osteoporotic than in non-osteoporotic female ... [more ▼]

In a retrospective cohort study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD), there was a greater association of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in osteoporotic than in non-osteoporotic female patients. No greater association was shown in treated patients with strontium ranelate or alendronate compared to untreated osteoporotic female patients. INTRODUCTION: We explored the risk of VTE in usual practice in osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic women with and without anti-osteoporotic treatment. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted using the GPRD in the UK. The cohorts consisted of untreated osteoporotic women (N = 11,546), osteoporotic women treated with alendronate (N = 20,084), or strontium ranelate (N = 2,408), and a sample of non-osteoporotic women (N = 115,009). Cohorts were compared using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. RESULTS: There was a significantly increased relative risk for VTE in untreated osteoporotic women versus non-osteoporotic women (annual incidence 5.6 and 3.2 per 1,000 patient-years, respectively; relative risk 1.75 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.84]). Results were confirmed using adjusted models. The annual incidences of VTE in osteoporotic patients treated with strontium ranelate and alendronate were 7.0 and 7.2 per 1,000 patient-years, respectively, with no significant difference between untreated and treated patients whatever the treatment. Adjusted hazard ratios for treated versus untreated osteoporotic women were 1.09 (95% CI, 0.60-2.01) for strontium ranelate and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.63-1.33) for alendronate. CONCLUSION: This study shows a greater association of VTE in osteoporotic compared to non-osteoporotic patients, but does not show any greater association in treated patients with strontium ranelate or alendronate compared to untreated osteoporotic patients. [less ▲]

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See detailIbandronate for the prevention of nonvertebral fractures: a pooled analysis of individual patient data.
Cranney, Ann; Wells, G. A.; Yetisir, E. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2009), 20(2), 291-7

SUMMARY: This analysis was conducted to assess the effect of high versus lower doses of ibandronate on nonvertebral fractures. The results were adjusted for clinical fracture, age, and bone density. The ... [more ▼]

SUMMARY: This analysis was conducted to assess the effect of high versus lower doses of ibandronate on nonvertebral fractures. The results were adjusted for clinical fracture, age, and bone density. The treatment effect was dose-dependent. Higher doses of ibandronate significantly reduced the risk of nonvertebral fractures more effectively compared with lower doses. INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of different doses of ibandronate on nonvertebral fractures in a pooled analysis. METHODS: Eight randomized trials of ibandronate were reviewed for inclusion. Alternative definitions of high versus low doses based on annual cumulative exposure (ACE) were explored. A time-to-event analysis was conducted using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Hazard ratios (HR) were derived using Cox regression and adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: Combining higher ACE doses of > or = 10.8 mg (150 mg once monthly, 3 mg i.v. quarterly, and 2 mg i.v. every 2 months) versus ACE doses of 5.5 mg, from two trials, resulted in an HR 0.62 (95% CI 0.396-0.974, p = 0.038). There was a dose-response trend with increasing ACE doses (7.2-12 mg) versus ACE of 5.5 mg. CONCLUSIONS: A dose-response effect on nonvertebral fractures was observed when comparing high with low ACE doses. A significant reduction in nonvertebral fractures was noted when pooling data from trials using ACE doses of > or = 10.8 mg versus ACE < or = 7.2 mg; and with ACE > or = 10.8 mg versus ACE of 5.5 mg (38% reduction). Higher ibandronate dose levels (150 mg monthly or 3 mg i.v. quarterly) significantly reduced nonvertebral fracture risk in postmenopausal women. [less ▲]

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See detailThe International Osteoporosis Foundation: history, objectives and achievements.
Cooper, C.; Rizzoli, R.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2009), 20 Suppl 3

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See detailEuropean guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.
Kanis, J. A.; Burlet, N.; Cooper, C. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2008), 19(4), 399-428

SUMMARY: Guidance is provided in a European setting on the assessment and treatment of postmenopausal women with or at risk from osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION: The European Foundation for Osteoporosis and ... [more ▼]

SUMMARY: Guidance is provided in a European setting on the assessment and treatment of postmenopausal women with or at risk from osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION: The European Foundation for Osteoporosis and Bone disease (subsequently the International Osteoporosis Foundation) published guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in 1997. This manuscript updates these in a European setting. METHODS: The following areas are reviewed: the role of bone mineral density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis and assessment of fracture risk; general and pharmacological management of osteoporosis; monitoring of treatment; assessment of fracture risk; case finding strategies; investigation of patients; health economics of treatment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A platform is provided on which specific guidelines can be developed for national use. [less ▲]

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See detailThe MOBILE study long-term extension: progressive improvements in efficacy with oral ibandronate (1500mg) when administered monthly
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Cooper, C.; Sedarati, F. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2007, May), 80(Suppl.1), 144

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