References of "Collette, Fabienne"
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See detailAge-related decline in cognitive control: the role of fluid intelligence and processing speed
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2014), 15(7),

Background Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. However, the reason of the differential age effect ... [more ▼]

Background Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. However, the reason of the differential age effect on cognitive control efficiency is still unclear. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence and processing speed on the selective age-related decline in proactive control. Eighty young and 80 healthy older adults were included in this study. The participants were submitted to a working memory recognition paradigm, assessing proactive and reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. Results Repeated measures ANOVAs and hierarchical linear regressions indicated that the ability to appropriately use cognitive control processes during aging seems to be at least partially affected by the amount of available cognitive resources (assessed by fluid intelligence and processing speed abilities). Conclusions This study highlights the potential role of cognitive resources on the selective age-related decline in proactive control, suggesting the importance of a more exhaustive approach considering the confounding variables during cognitive control assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailModulating effect of COMT genotype on the brain regions underlying proactive control process during inhibition
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 50

Introduction. Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met polymorphism) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of cognitive control functions ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met polymorphism) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of cognitive control functions. Methods. In an event-related fMRI study, a modified version of the Stroop task was administered to three groups of 15 young adults according to their COMT Val158Met genotype [Val/Val (VV), Val/Met (VM) and Met/Met (MM)]. Based on the theory of dual mechanisms of control (Braver, et al., 2007), the Stroop task has been built to induce proactive or reactive control processes according to the task context. Results. Behavioral results did not show any significant group differences for reaction times but Val allele carriers individuals are less accurate in the processing of incongruent items. fMRI results revealed that proactive control is specifically associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in carriers of the Met allele, while increased activity is observed in the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) in carriers of the Val allele. Conclusion. These observations, in keeping with a higher cortical dopamine level in MM individuals, support the hypothesis of a COMT Val158Met genotype modulation of the brain regions underlying proactive control, especially in frontal areas as suggested by Braver et al. [less ▲]

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See detailLa contribution des lobes frontaux au fonctionnement exécutif
Collette, Fabienne ULg

Conference (2014)

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See detailPLS analysis of fMRI data on cognitive processes
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

Conference (2013, December 12)

Cognitive processes like memory and self-referential are known to be underlined by extended neural networks. To study these complex processes, multivariate methods appear as the methods of the first ... [more ▼]

Cognitive processes like memory and self-referential are known to be underlined by extended neural networks. To study these complex processes, multivariate methods appear as the methods of the first choice since they take into account the functional integration. Partial Least Square (PLS) was used to study neural networks related to memory and self-referential processing in Alzheimer’s disease patients (AD) and two examples were presented. In the first one, we investigated the metabolic correlates of two forms of memory (conjunctive and relational memory performances) in AD. PLS identified two different brain networks highlighting correlations of the two types of memory and the glucose metabolism. In the second example, we assessed brain regions engaged during self-referential processing of information in AD patients during a task related fMRI study. PLS identified a wide brain network showing the effect of self- vs. other-referential processing. In contrast to univariate methods, PLS showed to be suitable for the study of cognitive processes. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of circadian rhythm and PER3 genotype on executive discriminative ability under sleep deprivation during a constant routine
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2013, August 12)

Maintaining optimal performance during a working memory task requires not only to detect target items but also to discard fillers. Following signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target ... [more ▼]

Maintaining optimal performance during a working memory task requires not only to detect target items but also to discard fillers. Following signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target from non-target stimuli is estimated by d prime (d'). Here we assessed whether d' was modulated by the oscillating circadian signal during a 42-hour constant routine while participants performed 13 sessions of auditory 3-back task. We also tested whether the individual vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism would influence this cognitive modulation imposed by sleep/wake regulation. From a sample of about 400 screened volunteers, thirty-five healthy young volunteers (age 19-26; 17 females) were recruited based on the PER3 polymorphism (twelve 5/5 and twenty-three 4/4 homozygotes). A linear mixed model tested on d’ the effect of circadian rhythmicity (based on melatonin level) and PER3 polymorphism. Given that 3back sessions were not administered at equidistant points, we used ranges to center each individual performance on dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). Analyses on d’ showed an effect of circadian oscillation (F(12,302) = 16.05, p< 0.0001), but also an interaction between gene and circadian oscillation (F(12,302)=1,88, p = 0.0362). This interaction was mainly characterized by a worst d’ in PER35/5subjects in the range covering a period between 21 and 23 hours after the DLMO (W=47; p = 0.0426). These results showed that circadian rhythm influence the discriminative ability under constant routine condition. Interestingly, we observed a better performance in PER34/4in the phase preceding the DLMO, but only in situation of high sleep pressure. Those results show that discriminative ability is differently affect by sleep homeostasis in PER3 polymorphism at the same circadian phase. We interpret this as a bigger vulnerability to sleep loss in PER35/5individuals in the period just before the wake maintenance zone. [less ▲]

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See detailDo fluid intelligence and executive functioning protect from age-related decline in cognitive control?
Manard, Marine ULg; Lorant, Caroline ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg

Poster (2013, July)

Age-related studies on cognitive control suggest a decline in proactive control whereas reactive control remains intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007). This study was designed to investigate the ... [more ▼]

Age-related studies on cognitive control suggest a decline in proactive control whereas reactive control remains intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007). This study was designed to investigate the potential influence of fluid intelligence (Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices) and general executive functioning (Executive composite score from executive assessment) on cognitive control abilities during normal aging. Cognitive control was assessed using a computerized version of the Stroop paradigm in which proactive and reactive control processes were pseudo randomly engaged by varying the amount of interference across the task. Thirteen young and 27 older adults were included in this study. In the whole sample, results confirmed a significant age-related decline in proactive control. However, when older adults were divided in high- and low fluid intelligence subgroups, only older adults with low fluid intelligence showed a significant decline in proactive control compared to younger adults and this difference disappeared for older adults with high fluid intelligence level. When older adults were distinguished according to high and low executive capacities, the analysis revealed that, compared to the young ones, older adults with low executive functioning showed a general cognitive control decline (proactive and reactive processes). However, differences disappeared when young adults were compared to older adults with a high executive functioning. Accuracy results suggested that older adults have a slower but spared access to goal-representations that are necessary to correctly manage interference. So, this study confirmed the previous results obtained by Braver et al. (2007), but also suggest an influence of fluid intelligence and executive resources that seems important to take into account to investigate age-related decline in reactive and proactive cognitive control processes. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain metabolic dysfunction in Capgras syndrome during Alzheimer’s disease: a positron emission tomography study
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Daury, Noémy; Cappa, Rémi et al

Poster (2013, June)

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See detailImpairment of two memory cerebral networks in Alzheimer's disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences (2013)

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See detailEffects of aging on task- and stimulus-related attention during a working memory task
Kurth, Sophie ULg; Hagelstein, Catherine ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences (2013)

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See detailThe role of memory traces quality in directed forgetting: A comparison of young and elderly participants using the item procedure
Lorant; Grandjean, Julien; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences (2013)

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See detailAn intervention study on physical activity and cognitive functioning in people with Parkinson’s disease
Rouillard, Maud ULg; Audiffren, Michel; Albinet, Cédric et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailThe impact of aging and hearing status on verbal short-term memory
Verhaegen, Clémence ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg

in Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2013)

The aim of this study is to assess the impact of hearing status on age-related decrease in verbal short-term memory (STM) performance. This was done by administering a battery of verbal STM tasks to ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study is to assess the impact of hearing status on age-related decrease in verbal short-term memory (STM) performance. This was done by administering a battery of verbal STM tasks to elderly and young adult participants matched for hearing thresholds, as well as to young normal-hearing control participants. The matching procedure allowed us to assess the importance of hearing loss as an explanatory factor of age-related STM decline. We observed that elderly participants and hearing-matched young participants showed equal levels of performance in all verbal STM tasks, and performed overall lower than the normal hearing young control participants. This study provides evidence for recent theoretical accounts considering reduced hearing level as an important explanatory factor of poor auditory-verbal STM performance in older adults. [less ▲]

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