References of "Collette, Fabienne"
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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

Poster (2012, June)

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See detailAlteration de l'interaction entre le Soi et la mémoire dans la maladie d'Alzheimer
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Maladie d'Alzheimer et déclin cognitif: recherche et pratique clinique (2012, May 22)

Le Soi et la mémoire sont deux systèmes en interaction chez l’homme. Ainsi, une information qui a été traitée en référence à soi fait l’objet de meilleures performances mnésiques qu’une information qui ... [more ▼]

Le Soi et la mémoire sont deux systèmes en interaction chez l’homme. Ainsi, une information qui a été traitée en référence à soi fait l’objet de meilleures performances mnésiques qu’une information qui n’est pas liée au Soi. Ce phénomène cognitif bien connu est appelé « l’effet de référence à soi en mémoire » (« Self Reference Effect », SRE ; 1). En outre, le rappel d’une information qui a été reliée à soi est davantage associé à une expérience recollective (souvenir du contexte d’apprentissage), phénomène appelé le « Self-reference recollection effect » (SRRE ; 2). Dans la maladie d’Alzheimer (MA), l’expérience recollective est sévèrement altérée (3). Si le SRE est principalement sous-tendu par l’expérience recollective, il devrait donc être diminué chez les patients avec MA. Dix-huit patients avec MA à un stade débutant et 21 sujets volontaires de contrôle ont réalisé une première tâche dans laquelle des adjectifs leur étaient présentés. Pour chaque adjectif, ils devaient dans un premier temps soit indiquer si le trait s’appliquait à eux-mêmes (condition soi) soit indiquer si le trait s’appliquait au Roi Albert/à la Reine Fabiola (condition autrui). Dans un second temps, les adjectifs des deux conditions (soi et autrui) étaient mélangés à de nouveaux adjectifs. Pour chaque adjectif, les participants devaient indiquer s’ils avaient vu l’adjectif dans les essais précédents ou non. Quelques jours plus tard, la même procédure était administrée aux participants avec un nouveau set d’adjectifs comparables à ceux de la première tâche, excepté que pour chaque adjectif que les participants indiquaient avoir préalablement vu, ils devaient décrire l’expérience qui avait guidé leur réponse (sentiment de familiarité, expérience recollective ou autre). Concernant la première tâche, l’analyse de la proportion d’adjectifs correctement reconnus révèle que le groupe contrôle présente un SRE alors que cet effet est absent dans le groupe avec MA. Concernant la seconde tâche, l’analyse des proportions de reconnaissances correctes basées (1) sur une expérience recollective et (2) sur un sentiment de familiarité révèle (1) que le groupe contrôle présente un SRRE alors que cet effet est absent dans le groupe MA, (2) que la proportion de réponses correctes basées sur un sentiment de familiarité est similaire entre les deux types d’adjectifs (soi et autrui) et ce dans les deux groupes. Chez les personnes âgées normales, l’information associée au Soi en mémoire est davantage récupérée sur base d’une expérience recollective, menant à de meilleures performances pour ce type d’information que pour une information non reliée au Soi. En revanche, chez les patients avec MA, l’interaction entre le Soi et la mémoire est altérée en ce sens que l’information relative à soi ne bénéficie pas d’une meilleure récupération en raison de la pauvre qualité du processus recollectif. Ces données suggèrent donc que chez les patients avec MA, même à un stade débutant de la maladie, la récupération en mémoire d’information relative à soi est quantitativement et qualitativement altérée. 1) T. Rogers, N. Kuiper, W. Kirker. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 37, 677 (1977). 2) M. Conway, S. Dewhurst. Applied Cognitive Psychology 9, 1 (1995). 3) G. Della Barba. Memory 5, 657 (1997). [less ▲]

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See detailDoes fluid intelligence protect from age-related decline in cognitive control ?
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Proceedings of the BAPS - SEPEX meeting (2012, May 11)

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence capacity on the age ... [more ▼]

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence capacity on the age-related decline in proactive control. We used a working memory recognition paradigm involving proactive or reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. 80 young adults (18-29 years old) and 80 healthy older adults (60-89 years old) were included. The main results revealed significant effects of age and fluid intelligence capacity on sensitivity to interference. As expected, reactive control performance remained intact with aging (similar interference effect in the two groups). In contrast, we observed a larger interference effect in the proactive condition in aging. Finally, older participants with similar level of fluid intelligence to young adults showed no proactive control age-related decrement. Beyond the fact that this study confirms the selective age-related decline in proactive control, it also indicates that the level of fluid intelligence influences the efficiency of proactive control in aging. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-appraisal and medial prefrontal activation in early stage Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

in Proceedings of the 1st Joint Meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences (BAPS, Belgium) and Sociedad Espanola de Psicologia Experimental (SEPEX, Spain) (2012, May 10)

Introduction Self-referential processing in healthy subjects is related to activation within cortical midline structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex ... [more ▼]

Introduction Self-referential processing in healthy subjects is related to activation within cortical midline structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (Northoff et al., 2006). The structures are known to be altered in Alzheimer’s disease (AD; Buckner et al., 2008). However, little is known about their engagement during self-referential processing in AD patients. Methods Twenty-two mild AD patients and 22 healthy controls (HC) were administered a self-appraisal task in an fMRI experimentation. The participants saw adjectives and had to indicate if the trait describes them (Self-condition; SC) or the King Albert II/the Queen Fabiola (Other-condition; OC). We examined differences between groups (HC>AD and AD>HC) and a conjunction analysis examined brain activations that were common to both groups during the self-appraisal process (p<.001 uncorrected with a-priori hypotheses). Results No region was found to be significantly more activated during self-appraisal in HC than in AD and vice versa. The VMPFC was the only region commonly activated in AD and HC during self-appraisal process (Punc<.001). Conclusions The study demonstrates that AD patients at early stages of the disease may still engage the MPFC during self-referential processing (compared to a well-known but not close “other”) as HC do. References: Northoff, G., Heinzel, A., de Greck, M., Bermpohl, F., Dobrowolny, H. & Pankseepp, J. (2006). Self-referential processing in our brain-A meta-analysis of imaging studies on the self. NeuroImage, 31, 440-457. Buckner, R.L., Andrews-Hanna, J.R., Schacter, D.L. (2008). The brain’s default network: anatomy, function and relevance to disease. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1124, 1-38. [less ▲]

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See detailModulating effect of COMT genotype on the brains regions underlying inhibition
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Grandjean, Julien ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2012, May)

Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme which degrades catecholamines, such dopamine, notably in the prefrontal cortex (Männistö & Kaakkola, 1999). A large number of studies reported an ... [more ▼]

Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme which degrades catecholamines, such dopamine, notably in the prefrontal cortex (Männistö & Kaakkola, 1999). A large number of studies reported an effect on executive functioning of COMT genotype (Barnett & al., 2007), each genotype being associated with a different COMT enzymatic activity (Weinshilboum & al., 1999). In an event-related fMRI study, a modified form of the Stroop task was administered to 45 young adults separated in three groups according to their COMT val158met genotype : 15 homozygous val/val (VV), 15 homozygous met/met (MM) and 15 heterozygotes val/met (VM). Both behavioral and fMRI results indicated the presence of a general interference effect consistent with prior reports (Nee & al., 2007). More interestingly, group comparisons indicate that this effect is associated, for a similar behavioral performance, with increased medial frontal and precentral gyrus activity in VV and VM groups by comparison with MM group. Conversely, no supplementary brain areas were observed for the comparison of the MM to the two other groups. These observations, paralleling with the lower COMT enzymatic activity and, thus, the higher cortical dopamine level in met/met individuals, confirms our expectation of a COMT Val158Met genotype modulation of the brain regions underlying inhibition efficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of aging and hearing status on verbal short-term memory
Verhaegen, Clémence ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg

Conference (2012, May)

We determined the impact of hearing status on age-related effects on verbal short-term memory (STM). Rabbit (1991) observed that elderly participants with hearing loss show impaired STM; he suggested that ... [more ▼]

We determined the impact of hearing status on age-related effects on verbal short-term memory (STM). Rabbit (1991) observed that elderly participants with hearing loss show impaired STM; he suggested that in the case of hearing loss, attentional resources had to be recruited to a larger extent to stimulus perception, reducing the available pool of attentional resources for STM processing. We tested this hypothesis by distinguishing the impact of aging from the impact of hearing status on STM. This was done by administering different verbal STM tasks to elderly and young adult participants matched for hearing threshold, as well as normal-hearing control participants. We observed that elderly participants and hearing-matched young participants showed equal levels of performance in all verbal STM tasks, and performed overall more poorly than the normal-hearing young control participants. These results suggest that mild hearing impairment is a major explanatory factor of reduced STM performance, and importantly, is age-independent. The results are discussed within an interactive framework of STM and attentional processing (Majerus et al., 2009). [less ▲]

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See detailContribution de l’approche génétique à la compréhension du fonctionnement cognitif
Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Revue de Neuropsychologie, Neurosciences Cognitives et Cliniques (2012), 4(2), 81-83

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See detailAdaptating test timing to the sleep-wake schedule: effects on diurnal neurobehavioral performance changes in young evening and older morning chronotypes
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Cajochen, Christian et al

in Chronobiology International (2012), 29(4), 482-490

The synchrony effect refers to the beneficial impact of temporal matching between the timing of cognitive task administration and preferred time of day for diurnal activity. Aging is often associated with ... [more ▼]

The synchrony effect refers to the beneficial impact of temporal matching between the timing of cognitive task administration and preferred time of day for diurnal activity. Aging is often associated with an advance in sleep-wake timing and concomitant optimal performance levels in the morning. In contrast, young adults often perform better in the evening hours. So far, the synchrony effect has been tested at fixed clock times, neglecting the individual’s sleep-wake schedule and thus introducing confounds such as differences in accumulated sleep pressure or circadian phase that may exacerbate synchrony effects. To probe this hypothesis, we tested older morning and young evening chronotypes with a psychomotor vigilance and a Stroop paradigm once at fixed morning and evening hours and once adapting testing time to their preferred sleep-wake schedule in a within-subject design. We observe a persistence of synchrony effects for overall median reaction times during a psychomotor vigilance task even when testing time is adapted to the specific individual’s sleep-wake schedule. However, data analysis also indicates that time-of-day modulations are weakened under those conditions for incongruent trials on Stroop performance and the slowest reaction times on the psychomotor vigilance task. The latter result suggests that the classically observed synchrony effect may be partially mediated by a series of parameters, such as differences in socio-professional timing constraints, the amount of accumulated sleep need or circadian phase, all leading to differential arousal levels at testing. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of acute sleep loss on the neural correlates of alerting, orientating and executive attention components
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012), 21(6), 648-58

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See detailThe influence of cognitive reserve on inter-individual variability in resting-state cerebral metabolism in normal aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Alzheimer's & Dementia : The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2012), 8(4), 80-81

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See detailMemory impairments in dementia: Which memory and how does it fail?
Salmon, Eric ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

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See detailCircadian preference modulates the neural substrate of conflict processing across the day
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(1), 29658

Human morning and evening chronotypes differ in their preferred timing for sleep and wakefulness, as well as in optimal daytime periods to cope with cognitive challenges. Recent evidence suggests that ... [more ▼]

Human morning and evening chronotypes differ in their preferred timing for sleep and wakefulness, as well as in optimal daytime periods to cope with cognitive challenges. Recent evidence suggests that these preferences are not a simple by-product of socio-professional timing constraints, but can be driven by inter-individual differences in the expression of circadian and homeostatic sleep-wake promoting signals. Chronotypes thus constitute a unique tool to access the interplay between those processes under normally entrained day-night conditions, and to investigate how they impinge onto higher cognitive control processes. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we assessed the influence of chronotype and time-of-day on conflict processing-related cerebral activity throughout a normal waking day. Sixteen morning and 15 evening types were recorded at two individually adapted time points (1.5 versus 10.5 hours spent awake) while performing the Stroop paradigm. Results show that interference-related hemodynamic responses are maintained or even increased in evening types from the subjective morning to the subjective evening in a set of brain areas playing a pivotal role in successful inhibitory functioning, whereas they decreased in morning types under the same conditions. Furthermore, during the evening hours, activity in a posterior hypothalamic region putatively involved in sleep-wake regulation correlated in a chronotype-specific manner with slow wave activity at the beginning of the night, an index of accumulated homeostatic sleep pressure. These results shed light into the cerebral mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences of higher-order cognitive state maintenance under normally entrained day-night conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Proceedings of the XII Colloque International sur le Vieillissement Cognitif (2012)

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See detailEvaluation de la conscience de soi dans le vieillissement normal et pathologique
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Jedidi, Haroun ULg et al

in Brédart, Serge; Van der Linden, Martial (Eds.) Identité et cognition. Apports de la psychologie et des neurosciences cognitives (2012)

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See detailItem familiarity and controlled associative retrieval in Alzheimer’s disease: An fMRI study.
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterised by altered recollection function, with impaired controlled retrieval of associations. In contrast, familiarity-based memory for individual items may sometimes be ... [more ▼]

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterised by altered recollection function, with impaired controlled retrieval of associations. In contrast, familiarity-based memory for individual items may sometimes be preserved in the early stages of the disease. This is the first study that directly examines whole brain regional activity during one core aspect of the recollection function: associative controlled episodic retrieval (CER), contrasted to item familiarity in AD patients. Cerebral activity related to associative CER and item familiarity in AD patients and healthy controls (HC) was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging during a word-pair recognition task to which the process dissociation procedure was applied. Some patients had null CER estimates (AD–), whereas others did show some CER abilities (AD+), although significantly less than HC. In contrast, familiarity estimates were equivalent in the three groups. In AD+, as in controls, associative CER activated the inferior precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). However, during associative CER, functional connection between this region and the hippocampus, the inferior parietal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was significantly higher in HC than in AD+. In all three groups, item familiarity was related to activation along the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). In conclusion, whereas the preserved automatic detection of an old item (without retrieval of accurate word association) is related to parietal activation centred on the IPS, the inferior precuneus/PCC supports associative CER ability in AD patients, as in HC. However, AD patients have deficient functional connectivity during associative CER, suggesting that the residual recollection function in these patients might be impoverished by the lack of some recollection-related aspects such as autonoetic quality, episodic details and verification. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

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See detailThe Neural Substrates of Memory Suppression: A fMRI Exploration of Directed Forgetting
Bastin, Christine ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(1), 29905

The directed forgetting paradigm is frequently used to determine the ability to voluntarily suppress information. However, little is known about brain areas associated with information to forget. The ... [more ▼]

The directed forgetting paradigm is frequently used to determine the ability to voluntarily suppress information. However, little is known about brain areas associated with information to forget. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine brain activity during the encoding and retrieval phases of an item-method directed forgetting recognition task with neutral verbal material in order to apprehend all processing stages that information to forget and to remember undergoes. We hypothesized that regions supporting few selective processes, namely recollection and familiarity memory processes, working memory, inhibitory and selection processes should be differentially activated during the processing of to-be-remembered and to-be-forgotten items. Successful encoding and retrieval of items to remember engaged the entorhinal cortex, the hippocampus, the anterior medial prefrontal cortex, the left inferior parietal cortex, the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus; this set of regions is well known to support deep and associative encoding and retrieval processes in episodic memory. For items to forget, encoding was associated with higher activation in the right middle frontal and posterior parietal cortex, regions known to intervene in attentional control. Items to forget but nevertheless correctly recognized at retrieval yielded activation in the dorsomedial thalamus, associated with familiarity-based memory processes and in the posterior intraparietal sulcus and the anterior cingulate cortex, involved in attentional processes. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of physical activity on the aging of motor and perceptual inhibition
Albinet, Cédric; Boucard, Geoffrey; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise (2012), 44(5), 544

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