References of "Collette, Fabienne"
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See detailInfluence of acute sleep loss on the neural correlates of alerting, orientating and executive attention components
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012), 21(6), 648-58

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See detailThe influence of cognitive reserve on inter-individual variability in resting-state cerebral metabolism in normal aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Alzheimer's & Dementia : The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2012), 8(4), 80-81

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See detailMemory impairments in dementia: Which memory and how does it fail?
Salmon, Eric ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

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See detailCircadian preference modulates the neural substrate of conflict processing across the day
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(1), 29658

Human morning and evening chronotypes differ in their preferred timing for sleep and wakefulness, as well as in optimal daytime periods to cope with cognitive challenges. Recent evidence suggests that ... [more ▼]

Human morning and evening chronotypes differ in their preferred timing for sleep and wakefulness, as well as in optimal daytime periods to cope with cognitive challenges. Recent evidence suggests that these preferences are not a simple by-product of socio-professional timing constraints, but can be driven by inter-individual differences in the expression of circadian and homeostatic sleep-wake promoting signals. Chronotypes thus constitute a unique tool to access the interplay between those processes under normally entrained day-night conditions, and to investigate how they impinge onto higher cognitive control processes. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we assessed the influence of chronotype and time-of-day on conflict processing-related cerebral activity throughout a normal waking day. Sixteen morning and 15 evening types were recorded at two individually adapted time points (1.5 versus 10.5 hours spent awake) while performing the Stroop paradigm. Results show that interference-related hemodynamic responses are maintained or even increased in evening types from the subjective morning to the subjective evening in a set of brain areas playing a pivotal role in successful inhibitory functioning, whereas they decreased in morning types under the same conditions. Furthermore, during the evening hours, activity in a posterior hypothalamic region putatively involved in sleep-wake regulation correlated in a chronotype-specific manner with slow wave activity at the beginning of the night, an index of accumulated homeostatic sleep pressure. These results shed light into the cerebral mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences of higher-order cognitive state maintenance under normally entrained day-night conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Proceedings of the XII Colloque International sur le Vieillissement Cognitif (2012)

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See detailEvaluation de la conscience de soi dans le vieillissement normal et pathologique
Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Jedidi, Haroun ULg et al

in Brédart, Serge; Van der Linden, Martial (Eds.) Identité et cognition. Apports de la psychologie et des neurosciences cognitives (2012)

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See detailItem familiarity and controlled associative retrieval in Alzheimer’s disease: An fMRI study.
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterised by altered recollection function, with impaired controlled retrieval of associations. In contrast, familiarity-based memory for individual items may sometimes be ... [more ▼]

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterised by altered recollection function, with impaired controlled retrieval of associations. In contrast, familiarity-based memory for individual items may sometimes be preserved in the early stages of the disease. This is the first study that directly examines whole brain regional activity during one core aspect of the recollection function: associative controlled episodic retrieval (CER), contrasted to item familiarity in AD patients. Cerebral activity related to associative CER and item familiarity in AD patients and healthy controls (HC) was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging during a word-pair recognition task to which the process dissociation procedure was applied. Some patients had null CER estimates (AD–), whereas others did show some CER abilities (AD+), although significantly less than HC. In contrast, familiarity estimates were equivalent in the three groups. In AD+, as in controls, associative CER activated the inferior precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). However, during associative CER, functional connection between this region and the hippocampus, the inferior parietal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was significantly higher in HC than in AD+. In all three groups, item familiarity was related to activation along the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). In conclusion, whereas the preserved automatic detection of an old item (without retrieval of accurate word association) is related to parietal activation centred on the IPS, the inferior precuneus/PCC supports associative CER ability in AD patients, as in HC. However, AD patients have deficient functional connectivity during associative CER, suggesting that the residual recollection function in these patients might be impoverished by the lack of some recollection-related aspects such as autonoetic quality, episodic details and verification. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

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See detailThe Neural Substrates of Memory Suppression: A fMRI Exploration of Directed Forgetting
Bastin, Christine ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(1), 29905

The directed forgetting paradigm is frequently used to determine the ability to voluntarily suppress information. However, little is known about brain areas associated with information to forget. The ... [more ▼]

The directed forgetting paradigm is frequently used to determine the ability to voluntarily suppress information. However, little is known about brain areas associated with information to forget. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine brain activity during the encoding and retrieval phases of an item-method directed forgetting recognition task with neutral verbal material in order to apprehend all processing stages that information to forget and to remember undergoes. We hypothesized that regions supporting few selective processes, namely recollection and familiarity memory processes, working memory, inhibitory and selection processes should be differentially activated during the processing of to-be-remembered and to-be-forgotten items. Successful encoding and retrieval of items to remember engaged the entorhinal cortex, the hippocampus, the anterior medial prefrontal cortex, the left inferior parietal cortex, the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus; this set of regions is well known to support deep and associative encoding and retrieval processes in episodic memory. For items to forget, encoding was associated with higher activation in the right middle frontal and posterior parietal cortex, regions known to intervene in attentional control. Items to forget but nevertheless correctly recognized at retrieval yielded activation in the dorsomedial thalamus, associated with familiarity-based memory processes and in the posterior intraparietal sulcus and the anterior cingulate cortex, involved in attentional processes. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of physical activity on the aging of motor and perceptual inhibition
Albinet, Cédric; Boucard, Geoffrey; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise (2012), 44(5), 544

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See detailEffects of Physical Activity on the Aging of Motor and Perceptual Inhibition
Albinet, Cédric; Boucard, Grégory; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Poster (2012)

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See detailSelf-appraisal and medial prefrontal activation in early stage Alzheimer’s disease.
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

Conference (2012)

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See detailDissociation entre recollection et familiarité dans la maladie d’Alzheimer: Etude des bases cérébrales en imagerie par résonance magnétique fonctionnelle
Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Conference (2012)

1. Matériels et méthodes. Les difficultés mnésiques des patients à un stade léger d’une maladie d’Alzheimer sont marquées par une atteinte sévère de la récupération consciente des informations dans leur ... [more ▼]

1. Matériels et méthodes. Les difficultés mnésiques des patients à un stade léger d’une maladie d’Alzheimer sont marquées par une atteinte sévère de la récupération consciente des informations dans leur contexte d’apprentissage (recollection). Par contre, la reconnaissance des informations sur base d’un sentiment de familiarité (savoir qu’une information a été rencontrée auparavant sans récupérer son contexte d’apprentissage) est relativement préservée (Dalla Barba, 1997; Rauchs et al., 2007). L’objectif de cette étude était de révéler les substrats cérébraux des processus de recollection et familiarité dans la maladie d’Alzheimer au moyen d’une tâche de mémoire associative analysée selon les principes de la Procédure de Dissociation des Processus (Jacoby, 1991). Pendant une acquisition en IRM fonctionnelle, 26 patients avec une maladie d’Alzheimer probable à un stade léger et 17 témoins âgés ont étudié des paires de mots, puis ont dû les reconnaître parmi des paires recombinées (deux mots vus mais pas ensemble) et des paires nouvelles. 2. Résultats. Les analyses comportementales ont indiqué que 10 patients Alzheimer avaient des indices de recollection nuls (AD-), tandis que 16 autres patients présentaient des processus de recollection résiduels (AD+) bien que significativement moins importants que les témoins. Par contre, le score estimant la contribution des processus de familiarité était équivalent dans les trois groupes. L’analyse de l’activité cérébrale a montré que, chez les patients AD+ comme chez les témoins, la recollection activait le cortex cingulaire postérieur. Cependant, cette région était fonctionnellement connectée à l’hippocampe, au cortex pariétal inférieur et au cortex préfrontal dorsolatéral uniquement chez les témoins. Par ailleurs, dans les trois groupes, la familiarité activait le sillon intrapariétal. 3. Conclusion. Cette étude montre un déficit sévère de recollection et une relative préservation de la familiarité chez des patients Alzheimer. Lorsque les patients possèdent des capacités résiduelles de recollection, celles-ci sont soutenues par le cortex cingulaire postérieur comme chez les personnes âgées saines. Cependant, une perturbation de la connectivité fonctionnelle entre le cortex cingulaire postérieur et des régions impliquées dans la mémoire relationnelle, les aspects subjectifs de la recollection et les processus de monitoring post-récupération suggère que la qualité de la recollection résiduelle des patients Alzheimer est dégradée. 4. Références. Dalla Barba, G. (1997). Recognition memory and recollective experience in Alzheimer's disease. Memory, 5, 657-672. Jacoby, L.L. (1991). A process dissociation framework: Separating automatic from intentional uses of memory. Journal of Memory and Language, 30, 513-541. Rauchs, G., Piolino, P., Mézenge, F., Landeau, B., Lalevée, C., Pélerin, A. et al. (2007). Autonoetic consciousness in Alzheimer's disease: Neuropsychological and PET findings using an episodic learning and recognition task. Neurobiology of Aging, 28, 1410-1420. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of cognitive reserve on inter-individual variability in resting-state cerebral metabolism in normal aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

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See detailCognitive reserve impacts on inter-individual variability in resting-state cerebral metabolism in normal aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2012), 63

There is a great deal of heterogeneity in the impact of aging on cognition and cerebral functioning. One potential factor contributing to individual differences among the elders is the cognitive reserve ... [more ▼]

There is a great deal of heterogeneity in the impact of aging on cognition and cerebral functioning. One potential factor contributing to individual differences among the elders is the cognitive reserve, which designates the partial protection from the deleterious effects of aging that lifetime experience provides. Neuroimaging studies examining task-related activation in elderly people suggested that cognitive reserve takes the form of more efficient use of brain networks and/or greater ability to recruit alternative networks to compensate for age-related cerebral changes. In this multi-centre study, we examined the relationships between cognitive reserve, as measured by education and verbal intelligence, and cerebral metabolism at rest (FDG-PET) in a sample of 74 healthy older participants. Higher degree of education and verbal intelligence was associated with less metabolic activity in the right posterior temporoparietal cortex and the left anterior intraparietal sulcus. Functional connectivity analyses of resting-state fMRI images in a subset of 41 participants indicated that these regions belong to the default mode network and the dorsal attention network respectively. Lower metabolism in the temporoparietal cortex was also associated with better memory abilities. The findings provide evidence for an inverse relationship between cognitive reserve and resting-state activity in key regions of two functional networks respectively involved in internal mentation and goal-directed attention. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of brain activity during a Stroop inhibitory task by the kind of cognitive control required
Grandjean, Julien ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(7), 41513

This study used a proportion congruency manipulation in the Stroop task in order to investigate, at the behavioral and brain substrate levels, the predictions derived from the Dual Mechanisms of Control ... [more ▼]

This study used a proportion congruency manipulation in the Stroop task in order to investigate, at the behavioral and brain substrate levels, the predictions derived from the Dual Mechanisms of Control (DMC) account of two distinct modes of cognitive control depending on the task context. Three experimental conditions were created that varied the proportion congruency: mostly incongruent (MI), mostly congruent (MC), and mostly neutral (MN) contexts. A reactive control strategy, which corresponds to transient interference resolution processes after conflict detection, was expected for the rare conflicting stimuli in the MC context, and a proactive strategy, characterized by a sustained task-relevant focus prior to the occurrence of conflict, was expected in the MI context. Results at the behavioral level supported the proactive/reactive distinction, with the replication of the classic proportion congruent effect (i.e., less interference and facilitation effects in the MI context). fMRI data only partially supported our predictions. Whereas reactive control for incongruent trials in the MC context engaged the expected fronto-parietal network including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex, proactive control in the MI context was not associated with any sustained lateral prefrontal cortex activations, contrary to our hypothesis. Surprisingly, incongruent trials in the MI context elicited transient activation in common with incongruent trials in the MC context, especially in DLPFC, superior parietal lobe, and insula. This lack of sustained activity in MI is discussed in reference to the possible involvement of item-specific rather than list-wide mechanisms of control in the implementation of a high task-relevant focus. [less ▲]

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See detailMémoire associative dans le vieillissement normal : Effet de l’unification des associations
Simon, Jessica ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Proceedings of the XIIème Colloque International sur le Vieillissement Cognitif (2012)

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See detailRelation entre la réserve cognitive et le métabolisme cérébral au repos dans le vieillissement normal.
Bastin, Christine ULg; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Proceedings of the XIIème Colloque International sur le Vieillissement Cognitif (2012)

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See detailAssociative memory in normal aging: The effect of unitization
Simon, Jessica ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Proceedings of the first joint meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences (BAPS) and the Sociedad Española de Psicología Experimental (SEPEX) (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (9 ULg)