References of "Collette, Fabienne"
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See detailModulating effect of COMT genotype on brain areas underlying cognitive control processes
Collette, Fabienne ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege

Conference (2016, March 18)

Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme which degrades catecholamines, such dopamine, notably in the prefrontal cortex. A large number of studies reported an effect on executive ... [more ▼]

Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme which degrades catecholamines, such dopamine, notably in the prefrontal cortex. A large number of studies reported an effect on executive functioning of COMT genotype, each genotype being associated with a different COMT enzymatic activity. In this talk, I will present some of our studies that explored the neural substrates of inhibitory processes according to COMT genotype. These studies showed that COMT genotype modulates the brain-level implementation of proactive and reactive inhibitory control processes. We will discuss how individual differences related to DA-mediated signaling can differently influence inhibition in function of the form of cognitive control required by the task, but also regarding the specific inhibitory mechanism induced by the task. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural bases of subsequent forgetting in young and older adults
François, Sarah ULiege; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULiege et al

Poster (2016, March 17)

Objectives Using functional MRI, we looked into the age-related difference in the neural underpinnings of subsequent forgetting - cerebral activation at encoding for items that are later forgotten ... [more ▼]

Objectives Using functional MRI, we looked into the age-related difference in the neural underpinnings of subsequent forgetting - cerebral activation at encoding for items that are later forgotten. Methods In an MRI scanner, during an incidental encoding phase, participants (20 young and 19 older adults) were presented with black-and-white drawings of objects. They were instructed to perform a size judgement on the depicted objects. Then, still in the scanner, the volunteers' memory for the objects was tested by showing them pictures shown previously along with new ones and asking them to make a Remember/Know/New judgement. Results Behaviourally, older participants showed decreased recollection, but intact familiarity at recognition. In an event-related design (SPM8), we compared cerebral areas activated at encoding for items subsequently forgotten compared to those leading to recollection (p<.001 uncorrected). In both groups, a pattern of activation consistent with the default-mode network (DMN) was found. Furthermore, results pointed out to additional activations in the frontoparietal control network in older adults. Also, contrasting activations for items subsequently forgotten with those leading to familiarity revealed activations in DMN areas. In young adults, these activations were limited to the posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions The forgetting of information appears to be associated with a higher recruitment of the DMN, which might reflect disengagement from encoding-supportive processes, both in young and older participants. Moreover, the additional fronto-parietal activity found in the older group could indicate that their failure to recollect the pictures was related to inefficient encoding mechanisms, in addition to disengagement from the task. [less ▲]

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See detailSeasonality in human cognitive brain responses
Meyer, Christelle ULiege; Muto, Vincenzo ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2016)

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See detailSuccessful episodic memory encoding in ageing: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULiege; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULiege et al

Poster (2016, January 25)

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See detailDisrupted interaction between memory and self in patients with Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege; Collette, Fabienne ULiege et al

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Memory (2016)

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See detailRelationship between grey matter integrity and executive abilities in aging
Manard, Marine ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege et al

in Brain Research (2016), 1642

This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate grey matter changes that occur in healthy aging and the relationship between grey matter characteristics and executive functioning. Thirty-six young ... [more ▼]

This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate grey matter changes that occur in healthy aging and the relationship between grey matter characteristics and executive functioning. Thirty-six young adults (18 to 30 years old) and 43 seniors (60 to 75 years old) were included. A general executive score was derived from a large battery of neuropsychological tests assessing three major aspects of executive functioning (inhibition, updating and shifting). Age-related grey matter changes were investigated by comparing young and older adults using voxel-based morphometry and voxel-based cortical thickness methods. A widespread difference in grey matter volume was found across many brain regions, whereas cortical thinning was mainly restricted to central areas. Multivariate analyses showed age-related changes in relatively similar brain regions to the respective univariate analyses but appeared more limited. Finally, in the older adult sample, a significant relationship between global executive performance and decreased grey matter volume in anterior (i.e. frontal, insular and cingulate cortex) but also some posterior brain areas (i.e. temporal and parietal cortices) as well as subcortical structures was observed. Results of this study highlight the distribution of age-related effects on grey matter volume and show that cortical atrophy does not appear primarily in “frontal” brain regions. From a cognitive viewpoint, age-related executive functioning seems to be related to grey matter volume but not to cortical thickness. Therefore, our results also highlight the influence of methodological aspects (from preprocessing to statistical analysis) on the pattern of results, which could explain the lack of consensus in literature. [less ▲]

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See detailCircadian and homeostatic sleep pressure modulate fMRI correlates of vigilant attention
Muto, Vincenzo ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege; Meyer, C et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2016), 25(s1),

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See detailContribution of four lifelong factors of cognitive reserve on late cognition in normal aging and Parkinson’s disease
Rouillard, Maud; Audiffren, Michel; Albinet, Cédric et al

in Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology (2016)

Introduction. Cognitive reserve (CR) was proposed to explain how individual differences in brain function help to cope with the effects of normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Education ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Cognitive reserve (CR) was proposed to explain how individual differences in brain function help to cope with the effects of normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Education, professional solicitations, engagement in leisure and physical activities across the lifetime are considered as major determinants of this reserve. Method. Using multiple linear regression analyses, we tested separately in healthy elderly and Parkinson's disease (PD) populations to what extent cognitive performance in several domains was explained by (1) any of these four environmental lifespan variables ; (2) demographic and clinical variables (age, gender, depression score and, for the PD group, duration of disease and dopaminergic drugs). We also tested for an interaction, if any, between these lifespan variables and brain pathology indexed by global atrophy measured from high-resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging. Results. Age was negatively associated with cognitive performance in the PD group. In healthy elderly participants, we observed significant positive associations between cognitive performance and 1) education, 2) leisure activities, 3) professional solicitation (decisional latitude). Furthermore, participants with greater brain atrophy benefited more from CR. In PD patients, education and professional solicitations contributed to cognitive performance but to a lesser extent than in controls. CR factors modulated the relationship between cognition and brain atrophy only in patients with a slight or moderate brain atrophy. Conclusions. Education is the CR factor that contributed the most to late cognitive functioning in both groups, closely followed by leisure activity in normal aging and professional solicitations in PD. Our results also provide evidence suggesting that the effects of CR does not express similarly in normal aging and PD. From a broader perspective, these results seem to indicate that CR factors the most consistently practiced across lifespan (education and professional solicitation) are those that are the more strongly associated to late cognitive efficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of COMT Genotype on Antero-Posterior Cortical Functional Connectivity Underlying Interference Resolution
Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege; Manard, Marine ULiege; DIDEBERG, Vinciane ULiege et al

in Cerebral Cortex (2016), 26

Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of executive functioning and its neural correlates ... [more ▼]

Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of executive functioning and its neural correlates. However, this attention has generally centred on the prefrontal cortices because of the well-known direct impact of COMT enzyme on these cerebral regions. In this study, we were interested in the modulating effect of COMT genotype on anterior and posterior brain areas underlying interference resolution during a Stroop task. More specifically, we were interested in the functional connectivity between the right inferior frontal operculum (IFop), an area frequently associated with inhibitory efficiency, and posterior brain regions involved in reading/naming processes (the two main non-executive determinants of the Stroop effect). The Stroop task was administered during fMRI scanning to three groups of 15 young adults divided according to their COMT Val158Met genotype [Val/Val (VV), Val/Met (VM) and Met/Met (MM)]. Results indicate greater activity in the right IFop and the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG) in homozygous VV individuals than in Met allele carriers. In addition, the VV group exhibited stronger positive functional connectivity between these two brain regions and stronger negative connectivity between the right IFop and left lingual gyrus. These results confirm the impact of COMT genotype on frontal function. They also strongly suggest that differences in frontal activity influence posterior brain regions related to a non-executive component of the task. Especially, changes in functional connectivity between anterior and posterior brain areas might correspond to compensatory processes for performing the task efficiently when the available dopamine level is low. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of successful memory retrieval in aging: Do executive functioning and task difficulty matter?
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Genon, Sarah ULiege et al

in Brain Research (2016), 1631

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See detailLe fonctionnement exécutif dans le vieillissement normal: Quel rôle accorder aux variables attentionnelles ?
Gilsoul, Jessica ULiege; Simon, Jessica ULiege; Collette, Fabienne ULiege

Conference (2015, December 04)

Introduction. Selon Miyake et al. (2000), le fonctionnement exécutif serait sous-tendu par trois fonctions distinctes - l’inhibition, la flexibilité et la mise à jour - alors que d’autres auteurs (Fisk ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Selon Miyake et al. (2000), le fonctionnement exécutif serait sous-tendu par trois fonctions distinctes - l’inhibition, la flexibilité et la mise à jour - alors que d’autres auteurs (Fisk & Sharp, 2004) suggèrent qu’elles seraient au nombre de quatre (coordination de tâche double). On sait aujourd’hui que l’avancée en âge s’accompagne d’un déclin exécutif. Toutefois, peu d’études ont étudié l’impact de variables non-exécutives (et plus particulièrement attentionnelles) sur la variabilité des performances exécutives dans le vieillissement. Méthode. 114 participants jeunes et 65 participants âgés ont réalisé un ensemble de tâches cognitives évaluant les quatre aspects du fonctionnement exécutif : l’inhibition (Stroop, Anti-saccade, Stop-Signal), la flexibilité (Plus et Moins, Chiffres-Lettres, Global-Local), la mise à jour (Mise à jour sonore, Mise à jour sémantique, Mise à jour de consonnes) et la coordination de tâche double (PASAT, Brown-Peterson, Attention divisée (TEA)). Par ailleurs, nous avons mesuré la vitesse de traitement de l’information (Comparaison de lettres, Stop-signal contrôle, Alerte tonique, Vitesse articulatoire), le fonctionnement attentionnel dans ses aspects d’alerte phasique, d’orientation visuelle externe (Balayage visuel, Motilité oculaire) et d’attention soutenue (Détection d’irrégularités visuelles, Détection de cibles), ainsi que le niveau d’empan. Nous avons tout d’abord comparé les performances des deux groupes sur chacune des tâches exécutives. Pour celles où nous avons observé une différence entre les groupes, nous avons tenté de déterminer si certaines variables non-exécutives pourraient expliquer une part de la variance des performances de nos participants âgés. Résultats. Les comparaisons entre groupes révèlent que les sujets jeunes ont toujours (sauf pour la tâche Stop-Signal) des performances exécutives supérieures à celles des âgés (p<0.01). Lorsque les différentes variables attentionnelles et non-attentionnelles sont introduites dans un modèle de régression multiple stepwise pas à pas, nous observons que les variables attentionnelles expliquent une part significative de la variance pour la tâche Chiffres-Lettres (alerte), la tâche de Mise à jour sémantique (orientation visuelle externe), la tâche de Mise à jour de consonnes (orientation visuelle externe) et la tâche d’attention divisée (alerte et orientation visuelle externe). Discussion. En accord avec de précédentes études, le fonctionnement exécutif décline avec l’âge. Nos résultats indiquent que le déclin de certaines fonctions (mais pas toutes) serait modulé par les capacités attentionnelles. Cette modulation attentionnelle ne serait toutefois pas un processus général, mais dépendrait des caractéristiques propres à chaque tâche. [less ▲]

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See detailMémoire et fonctions exécutives: Nouvelles pistes de recherche
Collette, Fabienne ULiege

Conference (2015, October 14)

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See detailThe neural basis of proactive and reactive control processes in normal aging.
Collette, Fabienne ULiege; Manard, Marine ULiege; François, Sarah ULiege et al

Conference (2015, September 19)

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See detailAge-related modulations in cognitive functions and its cerebral underpinnings
Collette, Fabienne ULiege

Conference (2015, September 04)

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See detailSeasonality in human cognitive brain responses.
Meyer, Christelle ULiege; Muto, Vincenzo ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege et al

Poster (2015, September 04)

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See detailThe impact of ageing on episodic memory encoding: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULiege; Angel, Lucie; SALMON, Eric ULiege et al

Poster (2015, September 04)

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See detailThe executive functioning in normal aging: Impact of the cognitive reserve
Simon, Jessica ULiege; Gilsoul, Jessica ULiege; Collette, Fabienne ULiege

Poster (2015, September 04)

There exists a large inter-individual variability regarding the effects of aging on cognition. According to Stern (2009), people who developed a high level of reserve are more resilient to the effects of ... [more ▼]

There exists a large inter-individual variability regarding the effects of aging on cognition. According to Stern (2009), people who developed a high level of reserve are more resilient to the effects of aging that individuals with lower cognitive reserve. In this study, we describe the impact of cognitive reserve on executive functions in normal aging. Ninety healthy participants aged from 60 to 80 years were recruited. We assessed the three major executive functions: Inhibition (Stroop test, Hayling test, TAP Incompatibility subtest), Shifting (TAP Flexibility subtest, Plus-Minus task), and Updating (Letter-Number Sequencing subtest from MEM III, Letter memory task, 2-back task). Cognitive reserve was measured by questionnaires assessing educational level, occupation, leisure activities and physical activity across the life. Multiple linear regressions (p<0.05) adjusted for age, quality of sleep, processing speed showed that elderly with a high level of reserve have better performance on updating. We also assessed the effect of each factor of cognitive reserve separately after adjustment for the other. We observed that people with high level of education have better performance on flexibility (TAP Flexibility subtest and composite score) and on updating (Letter-Number Sequencing subtest, Letter memory and composite score). However, we didn’t observe any significant effect of the other factors of cognitive reserve. These results suggest that the cognitive reserve is related to abilities in some executive tests. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of ageing and encoding instructions on episodic memory
Hagelstein, Catherine ULiege; François, Sarah ULiege; Manard, Marine ULiege et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

During ageing, a decline in episodic memory is observed, characterized by decreased recollection (a). In this study, we investigated the influence of encoding instructions, intentional or incidental, on ... [more ▼]

During ageing, a decline in episodic memory is observed, characterized by decreased recollection (a). In this study, we investigated the influence of encoding instructions, intentional or incidental, on the performance of younger and older adults during an episodic memory task. Twenty young volunteers (aged 18 to 30 years old) and 20 older volunteers (aged 61 to 72 years old) participated in this experiment. The stimuli consisted of 300 black-and-white drawings of common objects. The task comprised two steps. During the encoding phase, 100 items were presented once ("hard" condition) and 100 other items were presented twice ("easy" condition). During recognition, the items from the encoding phase were presented again, as well as 100 new items. In each age group, half of the participants received incidental encoding instructions (they had to make size judgements about the objects depicted) while the other half were explicitly asked to memorize the objects presented because they would be asked to recognize them later on (intentional encoding). During recognition, they performed a Remember-Know judgement for the items they believed they had seen earlier. We carried out ANOVAs in order to test for the influence of instructions, age group and number of repetitions of the items in one hand on the percentage of recollection and on the other hand on the percentage of familiarity (p<.05). Results show a significant effect of age, with more correct recollection responses in young adults, whereas more correct familiarity was found in older adults. Furthermore, it was found that the items presented twice lead to more recollection than those presented only once. Finally, these results also suggest that in the older group of participants, only for the items presented twice, intentional encoding instructions lead to more recollection and less familiarity. This finding is consistent with previous work showing that the elderly do not easily use elaborate encoding strategies, and that they need more support (here, a second exposition to the material) in order to perform a deep encoding when they are encouraged to do so with intentional learning instructions (b). (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Froger, C., Bouazzaoui, B., Isingrini, M., & Taconnat, L. (2012). Study time allocation deficit of older adults: the role of environmental support at encoding? Psychology and Aging, 27(3), 577-588. doi:10.1037/a0026358 [less ▲]

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