References of "Collette, Fabienne"
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See detailItem familiarity and controlled associative retrieval in Alzheimer's disease: An fMRI study
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49

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See detailBenevolent sexism alters executive brain responses
Dardenne, Benoît ULg; Dumont, Murielle; Sarlet, Marie et al

in Neuroreport (2013), 24(10), 572-577

Benevolence is widespread in our societies. It is defined as considering a subordinate group nicely but condescendingly, that is, with charity. Deleterious consequences for the target have been reported ... [more ▼]

Benevolence is widespread in our societies. It is defined as considering a subordinate group nicely but condescendingly, that is, with charity. Deleterious consequences for the target have been reported in the literature. In this experiment, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to identify whether being the target of (sexist) benevolence induces changes in brain activity associated with a working memory task. Participants were confronted by benevolent, hostile, or neutral comments before and while performing a reading span test in an fMRI environment. fMRI data showed that brain regions associated previously with intrusive thought suppression (bilateral, dorsolateral,prefrontal, and anterior cingulate cortex) reacted specifically to benevolent sexism compared with hostile sexism and neutral conditions during the performance of the task. These findings indicate that, despite being subjectively positive, benevolence modifies task-related brain networks by recruiting supplementary areas likely to impede optimal cognitive performance. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Journal of Psychophysiology (2013), 27(Suppl 1), 48

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailChronic exercise differentially impacts perceptual or motor inhibition as a function of age: a cross-sectional study
Albinet, Cédric; Boucard, Geoffrey; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailExploration of the mechanisms underlying the ISPC effect: Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging data
Grandjean, Julien; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Fias, Wim et al

in Neuropsychologia (2013), 51

The item-specific proportion congruent (ISPC) effect in a Stroop task – the observation of reduced interference for color words mostly presented in an incongruent color – has attracted growing interest ... [more ▼]

The item-specific proportion congruent (ISPC) effect in a Stroop task – the observation of reduced interference for color words mostly presented in an incongruent color – has attracted growing interest since the original study by Jacoby (2003). Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the effect: associative learning of contingencies and item-specific control through word reading modulation. Both interpretations have received empirical support from behavioral data. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the responsible mechanisms of the ISPC effect with the classic two-item sets design using fMRI. Results showed that the ISPC effect is associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate (ACC), dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC), and inferior and superior parietal cortex. Importantly, behavioral and fMRI analyses specifically addressing the respective contribution of associative learning and item-specific control mechanisms brought support for the contingency learning account of the ISPC effect. Results are discussed in reference to task and procedure characteristics that may influence the extent to which item-specific control and/or contingency learning contribute to the ISPC effect. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociative memory in aging: The effect of unitization on source memory
Bastin, Christine ULg; Diana, Rachel A.; Simon, Jessica ULg et al

in Psychology & Aging (2013), 28(1), 275-283

In normal aging, memory for associations declines more than memory for individual items. Unitization is an encoding process defined by creation of a new single entity to represent a new arbitrary ... [more ▼]

In normal aging, memory for associations declines more than memory for individual items. Unitization is an encoding process defined by creation of a new single entity to represent a new arbitrary association. The current study tested the hypothesis that age-related differences in associative memory can be reduced following encoding instructions that promote unitization. In two experiments, groups of 20 young and 20 older participants learned new associations between a word and a background color under two conditions. In the item detail condition, they had to imagine that the item is the same color as the background; an instruction promoting unitization of the associations. In the context detail condition, that did not promote unitization, they had to imagine that the item interacted with another colored object. At test, they had to retrieve the color that was associated to each word (source memory). In both experiments, the results showed an age-related decrement in source memory performance in the context detail but not in the item detail condition. Moreover, Experiment 2 examined receiver operating characteristics in older participants and indicated that familiarity contributed more to source memory performance in the item detail than in the context detail condition. These findings suggest that unitization of new associations can overcome the associative memory deficit observed in aging, at least for item-color associations. [less ▲]

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See detailVerbal learning in Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment:fine-grained acquisition and short-delay consolidation performance and neural correlates
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Moulin, Chris et al

in Neurobiology of Aging (2013), 34

The aim of this study was to examine correlations between acquisition and short-delay consolidation and brain metabolism at rest measured by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in 44 ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to examine correlations between acquisition and short-delay consolidation and brain metabolism at rest measured by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in 44 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients, 16 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who progressed to dementia (MCI-AD), 15 MCI patients who remained stable (MCI-S, 4–8 years of follow-up), and 20 healthy older participants. Acquisition and short-delay consolidation were calculated respectively as mean gained (MG) and lost (ML) access to items of the California Verbal Learning Task. MG performance suggests that acquisition is impaired in AD patients even at predementia stage (MCI-AD). ML performance suggests that short-delay consolidation is deficient only in confirmed AD patients. Variations in acquisition performance in control participants are related to metabolic activity in the anterior parietal cortex, an area supporting task-positive attentional processes. In contrast, the acquisition deficit is related to decreased activity in the lateral temporal cortex, an area supporting semantic processes, in patients at an early stage of AD and is related to metabolic activity in the hippocampus, an area supporting associative processes, in confirmed AD patients. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf et mémoire dans la maladie d'Alzheimer
Collette, Fabienne ULg

Conference (2012, November 20)

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See detailDoes processing speed protect from age-related decline in cognitive control ?
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Collette, Fabienne ULg

Poster (2012, October 27)

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007; Braver, 2012). This study investigated the potential ... [more ▼]

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007; Braver, 2012). This study investigated the potential influence of speed of processing abilities on the age-related decline in proactive control. We used a working memory recognition paradigm involving proactive or reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. 80 young adults (18-29 years old) and 80 healthy older adults (60-89 years old) were included. The main results revealed significant effects of age on sensitivity to interference. As expected, reactive control performance remained intact with aging (similar interference effect in the two groups). In contrast, we observed a larger interference effect in the proactive condition in aging. Finally, when the groups are matched according to their processing speed (assessed by the Code task of the WAIS III, with both younger and older adults having a score comprised between 60 and 93), the effect of age on sensitivity to interference disappeared. In other words, when younger and older adults had similar speed of processing abilities, no age-related proactive control decline was observed. In conclusion, beyond the fact that this study confirms the selective age-related decline in proactive control, it also indicates that speed of processing, a measure considered as reflecting the integrity of cognitive functioning during aging (Salthouse, 1996), influences the efficiency of proactive control in that population. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes processing speed protect from age-related decline in cognitive control?
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012, October 27)

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007; Braver, 2012). This study investigated the potential ... [more ▼]

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007; Braver, 2012). This study investigated the potential influence of speed of processing abilities on the age-related decline in proactive control. We used a working memory recognition paradigm involving proactive or reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. 80 young adults (18-29 years old) and 80 healthy older adults (60-89 years old) were included. The main results revealed significant effects of age on sensitivity to interference. As expected, reactive control performance remained intact with aging (similar interference effect in the two groups). In contrast, we observed a larger interference effect in the proactive condition in aging. Finally, when the groups are matched according to their processing speed (assessed by the Code task of the WAIS III, with both younger and older adults having a score comprised between 60 and 93), the effect of age on sensitivity to interference disappeared. In other words, when younger and older adults had similar speed of processing abilities, no age-related proactive control decline was observed. In conclusion, beyond the fact that this study confirms the selective age-related decline in proactive control, it also indicates that speed of processing, a measure considered as reflecting the integrity of cognitive functioning during aging (Salthouse, 1996), influences the efficiency of proactive control in that population. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for a role of a cortico-subcortical network for automatic and unconscious motor inhibition of manual responses
D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012)

It is now clear that non-consciously perceived stimuli can bias our decisions. Although previous researches highlighted the importance of automatic and unconscious processes involved in voluntary action ... [more ▼]

It is now clear that non-consciously perceived stimuli can bias our decisions. Although previous researches highlighted the importance of automatic and unconscious processes involved in voluntary action, the neural correlates of such processes remain unclear. Basal ganglia dysfunctions have long been associated with impairment in automatic motor control. In addition, a key role of the medial frontal cortex has been suggested by administrating a subliminal masked prime task to a patient with a small lesion restricted to the supplementary motor area (SMA). In this task, invisible masked arrows stimuli were followed by visible arrow targets for a left or right hand response at different interstimuli intervals (ISI), producing a traditional facilitation effect for compatible trials at short ISI and a reversal inhibitory effect at longer ISI. Here, by using fast event-related fMRI and a weighted parametric analysis, we showed BOLD related activity changes in a cortico-subcortical network, especially in the SMA and the striatum, directly linked to the individual behavioral pattern. This new imaging result corroborates previous works on subliminal priming using lesional approaches. This finding implies that one of the roles of these regions was to suppress a partially activated movement below the threshold of awareness. [less ▲]

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See detailDifference in neural correlates of discrimination during sleep deprivation in PER3 homozygous
Shaffii-Le Bourdiec, Anahita; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

Poster (2012, September 07)

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See detailInfluence of sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythm on executive discriminative ability during a constant routine
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Introduction & Objectives The human brain upholds cognitive performance throughout a waking day due to putative circadian (C) arousal signal (1) which counteracts the increase in homeostatic (H) sleep ... [more ▼]

Introduction & Objectives The human brain upholds cognitive performance throughout a waking day due to putative circadian (C) arousal signal (1) which counteracts the increase in homeostatic (H) sleep pressure associated to the deterioration in brain efficiency. When wakefulness is extended into the circadian night, maintenance of cognitive performance is jeopardized (Fig.1). Some individuals are very vulnerable to the negative effects of sleep loss and circadian misalignment, whereas others are resilient (3). These individuals differences can be readily explained within the conceptual framework of the circadian and homeostatic regulation of performance (4,5) but also by individual genetic differences and notably the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism (6). In this experiment, we investigated the consequences of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance during a working memory task (3-back). Following the signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target from non-target stimuli is estimated by d prime (d') and criterion (cr). Here we assessed whether d' and cr were modulated by the raising sleep need and the oscillatory circadian signal. We also tested whether the individual vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism influences this cognitive modulation, which is also driven by the sleep/wake regulation. Materials and Methods Population: Thirty-five right-handed healthy young volunteers aged from 19 to 26 (17 females) were recruited on the basis of their PER3 polymorphism. From a sample of about 400 screened volunteers, twelve 5/5 and twenty-three 4/4 homozygotes (matched for age, gender, chronotype, IQ, and level of education at the group level) participated in this study. Study protocol: Participants wore actigraphs for three weeks before the laboratory study. The first two weeks allowed us to determine their habitual sleep/wake schedule. During the third one, a strict sleep schedule adjusted on two possible timetables (00:00-08:00 or 01:00-09:00) was imposed in order to stagger fMRI sessions. Compliance to this schedule was again checked by wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries. The laboratory study began in the evening of day 1 and ran over 5 nights (Fig. 2). During the first 2 nights (habituation and baseline), the volunteers slept according to habitual sleep/wake schedule. Participants remained awake from the morning of day 3 for 42 hours. During this period, they remained in a semi-recumbent position, under dim light conditions (5 lux, eye level), with no information on clock time, in a constant routine protocol (CR). Saliva samples was hourly collected for melatonin analysis. Every 2 hours, volunteers received calibrated isocaloric snacks, behavioral data were collected and waking EEG recorded. During CR, behavioral measures were used to assess subjective (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale, KSS) and objective alertness (psychomotor vigilance task [PVT]). Executive functioning efficiency was assessed using the 3-back (Fig. 3) and SART tasks. During fMRI, participants performed alternating blocks of 0- and 3-back task. D’ and cr (Fig. 4) were analyzed with mixed-model analysis of variance (PROC Mixed), with main factors “session” and “genotype” (PER3 4/4 & PER3 5/5). All p-values derived from r-ANOVAs were based on Huynh-Feldt's (H-F) corrected degrees of freedom (p<0.05). Exploratory analysis assessed theoretical coefficients for the homeostatic sleep pressure (derived from a quasi-linear function) and the circadian oscillation (as a 24-hour period sine wave) were utilized in a multiple regression model to predict d’ and cr performance during the CR. Before these analyses, d’ and cr have been normalized using a z-score transformation. Results. Analyses on d’ 1. MIXED MODEL : Significant effect of sessions (F(12,385) = 17.16, p < 0.0001), but no group effect (F(1,133) = 0.00, p = 0.99) or interaction (F(12,385) = 1.51, p = 0.11). 2. REGRESSION: Significant regression (R² = 0.24, F(2,440) = 69.94, p <0.0001). The two predictors are significant (homeostat: p < 0.0001 ; circadian: p < 0.0001). Analyses on cr 1. MIXED MODEL : Significant effect of sessions (F(12,385) = 4.12, p < 0.0001), but no group effect (F(1,133) = 0.00, p = 0.99) or interaction (F(12,385) = 0.75, p = 0.71). 2. REGRESSION: Significant regression (R² = 0.04, F(2,440) = 9.35 , p = 0.0001). Only one predictor was significant (homeostat: p < 0.0001 ; circadian: p = 0.96). Conclusion These preliminary results show that both sleep homeostatic pressure and circadian factors influence executive discriminative ability during sleep loss, as assessed by signal detection theory (d’). Decision criterion (cr) appears modulated only by homeostatic sleep pressure. The difference between these two parameters could be explained by the theoretical modeling of the circadian oscillation and future analyses will incorporate individual experimentally-derived homeostatic and circadian parameters. Neither discrimination ability (d’) or criterion (cr) seem sensitive measures of individual cognitive vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by PER3 polymorphism. REFERENCES (1) Aston-Jones. Sleep Med. 2005, 6(Suppl 1), S3-7. (2) Dijk & Archer. Sleep Med. Rev. 2010, 14, 151-160.(3) Van Dongen & al. Sleep. 2004, 27, 423-433. (4) Mongrain & al. J. Sleep Res. 2006, 15, 162-166. (5) Van Dongen et al. Sleep. 2007, 30, 1129-1143. (6) Groeger & al. Sleep. 2008, 31, 1159-1167. (7) Vandewalle & al. J. Neuro. 2009, 29, 7948-7956. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & SPONSORS Cyclotron Research Centre (CRC) ; Belgian National Funds of Scientific Research (FNRS) ; Actions de Recherches Concertées (ARC, ULg) – Fondation Médicale Reine Elisabeth (FMRE) ; Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and Biotechnology (WELBIO) ; Wellcome Trust ; Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) [less ▲]

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