References of "Collette, Fabienne"
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See detailThe neural bases of proactive and reactive control processes in normal aging
Manard, Marine ULg; François, Sarah ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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See detailLes effets du vieillissement normal et pathologique sur la cognition
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(5-6), 265-269

Des troubles cognitifs touchant principalement le fonctionnement exécutif et mnésique sont observés lors du vieillissement normal et de la maladie d’Alzheimer, et sont associés à des changements au niveau ... [more ▼]

Des troubles cognitifs touchant principalement le fonctionnement exécutif et mnésique sont observés lors du vieillissement normal et de la maladie d’Alzheimer, et sont associés à des changements au niveau de l’activité cérébrale. Il apparait toutefois que différents facteurs sont susceptibles de retarder la survenue des troubles cognitifs, tels que la stimulation mentale ou la pratique d’une activité physique. De même, les prises en charge cognitives permettent d’améliorer le fonctionnement au quotidien des patients présentant une maladie d’Alzheimer (MA). Identifier les facteurs et techniques qui contribuent à maintenir une vitalité cognitive et/ou à contrer les effets de la MA permettront d’optimiser la qualité de vie des seniors. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Role of Memory Traces Quality in Directed Forgetting: A Comparison of Young and Older Participants
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Grandjean, Julien; Lorant, Caroline ULg et al

in Psychologica Belgica (2014), 54(4), 310-327

The presence of a reduced directed-forgetting (DF) effect in normal aging has been frequently observed with the item method. These results were interpreted as age-related difficulties in inhibiting the ... [more ▼]

The presence of a reduced directed-forgetting (DF) effect in normal aging has been frequently observed with the item method. These results were interpreted as age-related difficulties in inhibiting the processing of irrelevant information. However, since the performance of older adults is usually lower on items to remember, the age effect on DF abilities could also be interpreted as reflecting memory problems. Consequently, the present study aimed at investigating the influence of memory traces quality on the magnitude of the DF effects in normal aging. We predicted that increasing the quality of memory traces (by increasing presentation times at encoding) would be associated with attenuated DF effects in older participants due to the increased difficulty of inhibiting highly activated memory traces. A classical item-method DF paradigm was administered to 48 young and 48 older participants under short and long encoding conditions. Memory performance for information to memorize and to suppress was assessed with recall and recognition procedures, as well as with a Remember/Know/Guess (RKG) paradigm. The results indicated that, when memory traces are equated between groups, DF effects observed with the recall, recognition and RKG procedures are of similar amplitude in both groups (all ps>0.05). This suggests that the decreased DF effect previously observed in older adults might not actually depend on their inhibitory abilities but may rather reflect quantitative and qualitative differences in episodic memory functioning. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of aging and hearing status on verbal working memory
Verhaegen, Clémence ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg

in Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2014), 21(4), 464-482

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See detailCognitive and neuroimaging evidence of impaired interaction between Self and memory in Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 51

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect ... [more ▼]

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect (SRRE)). The current study examined this interaction at the behavioural level and its neural correlates in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Healthy older controls (HC) and AD patients performed trait-adjectives judgements either for self-relevance or for other-relevance (encoding phase). In a first experiment, the encoding and subsequent yes-no recognition phases were administrated in an MRI scanner. Brain activation as measured by fMRI was examined during self-relevance judgements and anatomical images were used to search for correlation between the memory advantage for self-related items and grey matter density (GMD). In a second experiment, participants described the retrieval experience that had driven their recognition decisions (familiarity vs. recollective experience). The behavioural results revealed that the SRE and SRRE were impaired in AD patients compared to HC participants. Furthermore, verbal reports revealed that the retrieval of self-related information was preferentially associated with the retrieval of contextual details, such as source memory in the HC participants, but less so in the AD patients. Our imaging findings revealed that both groups activated the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) at encoding during self-relevance judgments. However, the variable and limited memory advantage for self-related information was associated with GMD in the lateral prefrontal cortex in the AD patients, a region supporting high-order processes linking self and memory. These findings suggest that even if AD patients engage MPFC during self-referential judgments, the retrieval of self-related memories is qualitatively and quantitatively impaired in relation with altered high-order processes in the lateral PFC. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory Reactivation During Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep Promotes Its Generalization and Integration in Cortical Stores
Sterpenich, Virginie; Schmidt, Christina ULg; Albouy, Genevièvre et al

in Sleep (2014), 37(6), 1061-1075

Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. Here, we tested the influence of memory reactivation during REM sleep on memory performance and brain responses at ... [more ▼]

Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. Here, we tested the influence of memory reactivation during REM sleep on memory performance and brain responses at retrieval in healthy human participants. Auditory cues were associated with pictures of faces during their encoding. These memory cues delivered during REM sleep enhanced subsequent accurate recollections but also false recognitions. These results suggest that reactivated memories interacted with semantically-related representations, and induced new creative associations, which subsequently reduced the distinction between new and previously encoded exemplars. Cues had no effect if presented during stage 2 sleep, or if they were not associated with faces during encoding. Functional MRI revealed that following exposure to conditioned cues during REM sleep, responses to faces during retrieval were enhanced both in a visual area and in a cortical region of multisensory (auditory-visual) convergence. These results show that reactivating memories during REM sleep enhances cortical responses during retrieval, suggesting the integration of recent memories within cortical circuits, favoring the generalization and schematization of the information. [less ▲]

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See detailMetabolic cerebral correlates of conjunctive and relational memory in Alzheimer's disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Poster (2014)

Introduction. Memory deficits are the clinical hallmark of typical Alzheimer’s disease. The precise nature of these deficits however remains to be fully characterized. In this study, we investigated ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Memory deficits are the clinical hallmark of typical Alzheimer’s disease. The precise nature of these deficits however remains to be fully characterized. In this study, we investigated binding in long-term episodic memory. Relational binding processes in memory create an associative link between independent items or between items and context into episodic memories (Cohen et al., 1999). An alternative process, conjunctive binding, allows associations to be encoded as a united representation of features into a single entity (O'Reilly and Rudy, 2001; Mayes et al., 2007). The current study (1) assessed whether Alzheimer’s disease disrupt both conjunctive and relational memory, and (2) related patients’ memory performance to cerebral metabolism. Methods. Thirty patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease and 24 healthy older adults performed a source memory task where items were associated to a background color (Diana et al., 2008, 2010). In one condition, relational binding was promoted by the instruction to associate the item with another object of the same color as the background. In the other condition, color had to be integrated as an item feature (conjunctive binding). Patients’ brain metabolic activity at rest (FDG-PET) was analysed with spatio-temporal Partial Least Squares (McIntosh et al., 1996) in order to assess the relation of behavioral performance and activity in functional cerebral networks. Results. Alzheimer’s disease patients had an impaired capacity to remember item-color associations, with deficits in both relational and conjunctive memory. However, performance in the two kinds of associative memory varied independently across patients. Partial least square analyses revealed a significant pattern of metabolic activity that correlated specifically with each condition (accounting for 76.48 % of the covariance in the data; p< .05). More specifically, poor conjunctive memory was related to hypometabolism in an anterior temporal-posterior fusiform brain network, whereas relational memory correlated with metabolism in regions of the default mode network. Conclusions. These findings support the hypothesis of distinct neural systems specialized in different types of associative memory and point to heterogeneous profiles of memory alteration in Alzheimer’s disease as a function of damage to the respective neural networks. [less ▲]

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See detailA Partial Least Squares Analysis of the self reference effect in Alzheimer's disease: A reply to Irish
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 54

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See detailAge-related decline in cognitive control: the role of fluid intelligence and processing speed
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2014), 15(7),

Background Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. However, the reason of the differential age effect ... [more ▼]

Background Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. However, the reason of the differential age effect on cognitive control efficiency is still unclear. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence and processing speed on the selective age-related decline in proactive control. Eighty young and 80 healthy older adults were included in this study. The participants were submitted to a working memory recognition paradigm, assessing proactive and reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. Results Repeated measures ANOVAs and hierarchical linear regressions indicated that the ability to appropriately use cognitive control processes during aging seems to be at least partially affected by the amount of available cognitive resources (assessed by fluid intelligence and processing speed abilities). Conclusions This study highlights the potential role of cognitive resources on the selective age-related decline in proactive control, suggesting the importance of a more exhaustive approach considering the confounding variables during cognitive control assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailModulating effect of COMT genotype on the brain regions underlying proactive control process during inhibition
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 50

Introduction. Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met polymorphism) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of cognitive control functions ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met polymorphism) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of cognitive control functions. Methods. In an event-related fMRI study, a modified version of the Stroop task was administered to three groups of 15 young adults according to their COMT Val158Met genotype [Val/Val (VV), Val/Met (VM) and Met/Met (MM)]. Based on the theory of dual mechanisms of control (Braver, et al., 2007), the Stroop task has been built to induce proactive or reactive control processes according to the task context. Results. Behavioral results did not show any significant group differences for reaction times but Val allele carriers individuals are less accurate in the processing of incongruent items. fMRI results revealed that proactive control is specifically associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in carriers of the Met allele, while increased activity is observed in the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) in carriers of the Val allele. Conclusion. These observations, in keeping with a higher cortical dopamine level in MM individuals, support the hypothesis of a COMT Val158Met genotype modulation of the brain regions underlying proactive control, especially in frontal areas as suggested by Braver et al. [less ▲]

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