References of "Collette, Fabienne"
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See detailLes troubles cognitifs associés au vieillissement normal
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Audiffren, Michel

in Audiffren, Michel; François, Pierre-Henri (Eds.) Créativité, Motivation et Vieillissement. Les science cognitives en débat. (2012)

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See detailPerceptual and motor abilities in normal aging and Alzheimer’s disease: a preliminary study
Stawarczyk, David ULg; Grandjean, Julien ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Archives of Gerontology & Geriatrics (2012), 54

Deficits in inhibitory abilities are frequently observed in normal aging and Alzheimer disease (AD). However, few studies have explored the generality of these deficits in a single group of participants ... [more ▼]

Deficits in inhibitory abilities are frequently observed in normal aging and Alzheimer disease (AD). However, few studies have explored the generality of these deficits in a single group of participants. A battery of tasks assessing perceptual and motor inhibitory functioning was administered to young and older healthy participants (Study 1), as well as to mild Alzheimer patients (Study 2). Results did not agree with a selective impairment of motor or perceptual inhibition in either AD or normal aging but rather suggest that a decrease in cognitive resources available in working memory could explain inhibitory performance both in normal aging and AD. [less ▲]

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See detailAging effect on recollection and familiarity processes
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

Scientific conference (2011, December 22)

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See detailModulating effect of COMT genotype on the brain regions underlying inhibition
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Grandjean, Julien ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2011, June 26)

Introduction Catechol-O-methytransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme which degrades catecholamines, such dopamine, notably in the prefrontal cortex (Männistö & Kaakkola, 1999). Actually, a transition of ... [more ▼]

Introduction Catechol-O-methytransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme which degrades catecholamines, such dopamine, notably in the prefrontal cortex (Männistö & Kaakkola, 1999). Actually, a transition of guanine to adenine at codon 158 of the COMT gene results in a valine to methionine substitution (Lotta & al., 1995). This phenomenon leads to different COMT genotypes, each associated with a different COMT enzymatic activity (Weinshilboum, & al., 1999). A large number of studies reported an effect of COMT on executive functioning. However, most of them used multi-determined executive tasks (e.g., Barnett & al., 2007). We are interested here to determine the effect of COMT Val158Met genotype on the activity of frontal and parietal areas (Nee & al., 2007; Laird & al., 2005) underlying the specific executive process of inhibition. Methods Procedure In an event-related fMRI experiment, a modified form of the Stroop task was administered to 44 young adults (age range: 18-30) separated into three groups according to their COMT Val158Met genotype: 15 homozygous val/val (VV), 14 homozygous met/met (MM) and 15 heterozygotes val/met (VM) carriers. The Stroop task consisted in the presentation of color words printed in various ink colors (e.g the word blue written in red). Subjects were instructed to name of ink color as fast and accurately as possible by avoiding to read the word. In this version of the Stroop task, three different contexts were created (data not showed here): (1) a congruent context (MC) with a majority of facilitator items (IC), (2) a non-congruent context (MI) with mainly interfering items (II), (3) a neutral context (MN) with mainly neutral items (IN, series of %%% written in different colors). MRI acquisition, data analysis Functional MRI time series were acquired on a 3T head-only scanner operated with the standard transmit-receive quadrature head coil. Multislice T2*-weighted functional images were acquired with a gradient-echo echo-planar imaging sequence using axial slice orientation and covering the whole brain (32 slices, FoV = 220x220 mm², voxel size 3.4x3.4x3 mm³, 30% interslice gap, matrix size 64x64x32, TR = 2130 ms, TE = 40 ms, FA = 90°). Structural images were obtained using a high resolution T1-weighted sequence (3D MDEFT [Deichmann & al., (2004)] ; TR = 7.92 ms, TE = 2.4 ms, TI = 910 ms, FA = 15°, FoV = 256 x 224 x 176 mm³, 1 mm isotropic spatial resolution). Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed with SPM8 (p<.001 uncorrected). Results Behavioral results indicated the presence of a general interference effect (II – IN items) for reaction time (F(1,41) = 292,44 ; p < 0,001) but no significant difference in interference between the three groups (F(2,41) = 0,27; p = 0,76). FMRI results revealed that interference effect [(MI_II-MI_IN) + (MC_II-MC_IN) + (MN_II-MN_IN)] observed in our three groups is mainly associated with cerebral activity in frontal and parietal areas. Moreover, group comparisons indicates that this effect is associated with increased medial frontal and precentral gyrus activity in VV and VM groups by comparison with MM group, but also in the superior temporal gyrus and in the thalamus in the VM by comparison to MM . Conversely, no supplementary brain area was observed for the comparison of the MM to the two other groups. Conclusions The fronto-parietal brain network associated with interference resolution observed here is consistent with prior reports (Nee & al., 2007; Laird & al., 2005). Moreover, results showed activity in different brain areas according to the COMT genotype. Indeed, a similar behavioral performance is associated to the recruitment of supplementary areas in the carriers of the val allele. This observation, paralleling with the lower COMT enzymatic activity and, thus, the higher cortical dopamine level in met/met individuals, confirms our expectation of a COMT Val158Met genotype modulation of the brain regions underlying inhibition efficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep contributes to the strengthening of some memories over others, depending on hippocampal activity at learning.
Rauchs, Géraldine; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Landeau, Brigitte et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2011), 31(7), 2563-2568

Memory consolidation benefits from sleep. Besides strengthening some memory traces, another crucial, albeit overlooked, function of memory is also to erase irrelevant information. Directed forgetting is ... [more ▼]

Memory consolidation benefits from sleep. Besides strengthening some memory traces, another crucial, albeit overlooked, function of memory is also to erase irrelevant information. Directed forgetting is an experimental approach consisting in presenting “to be remembered” and “to be forgotten” information, that allows selectively decreasing or increasing the strength of individual memory traces according to the instruction provided at learning. This paradigm was used in combination with fMRI to determine, in Humans, what specifically triggers at encoding sleep-dependent compared to time-dependent consolidation. Our data indicate that relevant items which subjects strived to memorize are consolidated during sleep to a greater extend than items that participants did not intend to learn. This process appears to depend on a differential activation of the hippocampus at encoding, which acts as a signal for the offline reprocessing of relevant memories during post-learning sleep episodes. [less ▲]

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See detailDissociation between controlled and automatic processes in the behavioral variant of fronto-temporal dementia
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg

in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease [=JAD] (2011), 22(3), 897-907

A decline of cognitive functioning affecting several cognitive domains was frequently reported in patients with frontotemporal dementia. We were interested in determining if these deficits can be ... [more ▼]

A decline of cognitive functioning affecting several cognitive domains was frequently reported in patients with frontotemporal dementia. We were interested in determining if these deficits can be interpreted as reflecting an impairment of controlled cognitive processes by using an assessment tool specifically developed to explore the distinction between automatic and controlled processes, namely the process dissociation procedure (PDP) developed by Jacoby [1]. The PDP was applied to a word stem completion task to determine the contribution of automatic and controlled processes to episodic memory performance and was administered to a group of 12 patients with the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD) and 20 control subjects (CS). Bv-FTD patients obtained a lower performance than CS for the estimates of controlled processes, but no group differences was observed for estimates of automatic processes. The between-groups comparison of the estimates of controlled and automatic processes showed a larger contribution of automatic processes to performance in bv-FTD, while a slightly more important contribution of controlled processes was observed in control subjects. These results are clearly indicative of an alteration of controlled memory processes in bv-FTD. [less ▲]

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See detailIs brain activity during a Stroop inhibitory task modulated by the kind of cognitive control required?
Collette, Fabienne ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg et al

Conference (2011)

Performance on the Stroop task is associated to a large antero-posterior cerebral network involving notably the anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In this study, we used a mixed-BOLD ... [more ▼]

Performance on the Stroop task is associated to a large antero-posterior cerebral network involving notably the anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In this study, we used a mixed-BOLD-fMRI design (N=25) to determine the neural substrates of inhibitory functioning in a Stroop task according to contextual information. Consequently, two task-contexts were created: (1) congruent context with a majority of facilitator items, (2) non-congruent context with mainly interfering items. Based on the dual cognitive control model, we postulated that the non-congruent blocks will involve proactive control, which is anticipatory, sustained, and involved when a large number of interfering items are successively presented. On the contrary, congruent blocks were assumed to involve reactive control, which occurs when few interfering items are presented, and just after the presentation of these items only. On this basis, we hypothesized that the kind of cognitive control modulates cerebral activity associated to inhibitory functioning. For behavioral data, we obtained faster response times for interfering items in the non-congruent vs. congruent condition, indicating proactive control specific to the congruent condition only. Functional neuro-imaging data showed an increased transient activity for interfering vs neutral items in a fronto-parietal network more important in the congruent than in the neutral condition. A similar contrast in the non-congruent condition showed no significant brain activity at the statistical threshold used. These data indicate the existence of a modulation of the cerebral areas associated to inhibitory functioning according to the kind of cognitive control necessary to perform the task. [less ▲]

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See detailThe cerebral metabolic correlates of episodic autobiographical memory in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment
Bastin, Christine ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Jedidi, Haroun ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Memory (2011)

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See detailThe neural correlates of cognitive reserve in aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Scientific conference (2011)

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See detailDevelopment and organization of executive functions in 4-to 11 year-old children: A factor study.
Catale, Corinne ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Lejeune, Caroline ULg et al

in Books of Abstract: Annual Meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Science (2011)

Executive functioning (EF) is an umbrella term used to refer to the higher-order cognitive processes whose principal function is to facilitate the adaptation of an individual to new and non-routine ... [more ▼]

Executive functioning (EF) is an umbrella term used to refer to the higher-order cognitive processes whose principal function is to facilitate the adaptation of an individual to new and non-routine situations. In the present study, inhibition, mental flexibility, and working memory were assessed through 6 executive tasks administered to 329 children aged from 4 to 11 years, in order to examine the development and organization of executive functioning in both early and middle childhood. Results reveal specific developmental trends for each component, with a period of rapid general development during the preschool period. Confirmatory factor analyses were used to examine the organization of EF in our sample. First, the poorness of fit of the unitary model was found for both groups, confirming the fractionated nature of EF in preschoolers as well as in older children. Second, the analyses confirmed the adequacy of the fit of the three-dimensional model (i.e., inhibition, flexibility, and working memory), while also indicating that other specific two-dimensional models gave reasonable fits to the data from both age groups. The factor structure obtained supports both the unitary and diversity nature of the executive organisation during early and middle childhood. Furthermore, our data suggest a progressive differentiation of executive processes (in particular flexibility and working memory) in the course of development. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of controlled memory processes in questionable Alzheimer’s disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Kerrouche, Nacer; LEKEU, Françoise ULg et al

in Ashford, J. Wesson; Rosen, Allyson; Adamson, Maheen (Eds.) et al Advances in Alzheimer's Disease. Volume 2: Handbook of imaging the Alzheimer brain (2011)

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive loss of controlled cognitive processes (processes requiring mental effort and attentional resources), and functional neuroimaging at early stages ... [more ▼]

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive loss of controlled cognitive processes (processes requiring mental effort and attentional resources), and functional neuroimaging at early stages of AD provides an opportunity to tease out the neural correlates of controlled processes. Controlled and automatic memory performance was assessed with the Process Dissociation Procedure in 50 patients diagnosed with questionable Alzheimer’s disease (QAD). The patients’ brain glucose metabolism was measured using FDG-PET. After a follow-up period of 36 months, 27 patients had converted to AD, while 23 remained stable. Both groups showed a similar decrease in controlled memory processes but preserved automatic processes at entry into the study, suggesting that impairment of controlled memory would not be specific for AD. Patients who subsequently converted to Alzheimer type dementia showed significantly decreased brain metabolism at baseline compared to stable QAD in associative cortices known to be involved in AD (the left precuneus, the right inferior parietal lobule and bilateral middle temporal cortex).Voxel-based cognitive and metabolic correlations showed that a decrease in controlled memory processes was preferentially correlated with lower activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortices in very early AD patients. The dorsomedial prefrontal cortex would play a role in controlled memory processes as they relate to reflective and monitoring processes, while the posterior cingulate cortex is involved in the controlled access to previously encoded episodes. In stable QAD patients, reduced controlled performance in verbal memory correlated with impaired activity in the left anterior hippocampal structure, which would alter the reactivation of associations created at encoding. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural precursors of delayed insight
Darsaud, Annabelle ULg; Wagner, Ullrich; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2011), 23(8), 1900-1910

The solution of a problem left unresolved in the evening can sometimes pop into mind as a sudden insight after a night of sleep in the following morning. Although favorable effects of sleep on insightful ... [more ▼]

The solution of a problem left unresolved in the evening can sometimes pop into mind as a sudden insight after a night of sleep in the following morning. Although favorable effects of sleep on insightful behavior have been experimentally confirmed, the neural mechanisms determining this delayed insight remain unknown. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterize the neural precursors of delayed insight in the number reduction task (NRT), in which a hidden task structure can be learned implicitly, but can also be recognized explicitly in an insightful process, allowing immediate qualitative improvement in task performance. Normal volunteers practiced the NRT during two fMRI sessions (training and retest), taking place 12 hours apart after a night of sleep. After this delay, half of the subjects gained insight into the hidden task structure ("solvers," S), whereas the other half did not ("nonsolvers," NS). Already at training, solvers and nonsolvers differed in their cerebral responses associated with implicit learning. In future solvers, responses were observed in the superior frontal sulcus, posterior parietal cortex, and the insula, three areas mediating controlled processes and supporting early learning and novice performance. In contrast, implicit learning was related to significant responses in the hippocampus in nonsolvers. Moreover, the hippocampus was functionally coupled with the basal ganglia in nonsolvers and with the superior frontal sulcus in solvers, thus potentially biasing participants' strategy towards implicit or controlled processes of memory encoding, respectively. Furthermore, in solvers but not in nonsolvers, response patterns were further transformed overnight, with enhanced responses in ventral medial prefrontal cortex, an area previously implicated in the consolidation of declarative memory. During retest in solvers, before they gain insight into the hidden rule, significant responses were observed in the same medial prefrontal area. After insight, a distributed set of parietal and frontal areas is recruited among which information concerning the hidden rule can be shared in a so-called global workspace. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of response prepotency strength, general working memory resources, and specific working memory load on the ability to inhibit predominant responses: A comparison of young and elderly participants
Grandjean, Julien ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Brain & Cognition (2011), 77

One conception of inhibitory functioning suggests that the ability to successfully inhibit a predominant response depends mainly on the strength of that response, the general functioning of working memory ... [more ▼]

One conception of inhibitory functioning suggests that the ability to successfully inhibit a predominant response depends mainly on the strength of that response, the general functioning of working memory processes, and the working memory demand of the task (Roberts, Hager, and Heron, 1994). The proposal that inhibition and functional working memory capacity interact was assessed in the present study using two motor inhibition tasks (Go/No-Go and response incompatibility) in young and older participants. The strength of prepotency was assessed with a short or long training phase for the response to be inhibited. The influence of working memory resources was evaluated by administering the tasks in full versus divided attention conditions. The effect of working memory load was manipulated by increasing the number of target and distracter items in each task. Results showed no effect of prepotency strength, whereas dividing attentional resources and increasing working memory load were associated with greater inhibitory effects in both groups and for both tasks. This deleterious effect was higher for older participants, except in the working memory load condition of the Go/No-Go task. These results suggest an interactive link between working memory and response inhibition by showing that taxing working memory resources increases the difficulty of inhibiting prepotent responses in younger and older subjects. The additional detrimental effect of these factors on healthy elderly subjects was related to their decreased cognitive resources and to their shorter span size. [less ▲]

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