References of "Collette, Fabienne"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBrain metabolic dysfunction in Capgras delusion during Alzheimer’s disease: a positron emission tomography study
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Daury, Noémy; Rémi, Capa et al

in American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias (in press)

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since ... [more ▼]

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since little is known regarding the neural correlates of Capgras syndrome, the cerebral metabolic pattern of a patient with probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Capgras syndrome was compared with those of 24 healthy elderly subjects and 26 AD patients without delusional syndrome. Compared to the healthy and AD groups, the patient had significant hypometabolism in frontal and posterior midline structures. In light of current neural models of face perception, our patient’s Capgras syndrome may be related to impaired recognition of a familiar face, subserved by the posterior cingulate/precuneus cortex, and impaired reflection about personally relevant knowledge related to a face, subserved by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (32 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModulating effect of COMT Val158Met polymorphism on interference resolution during a working memory task
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; DIDEBERG, Vinciane ULg; Bours, Vincent ULg et al

in Brain & Cognition (in press)

Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene has received increasing attention in the last 15 years, in particular as a potential modulator of the neural substrates ... [more ▼]

Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene has received increasing attention in the last 15 years, in particular as a potential modulator of the neural substrates underlying inhibitory processes and updating in working memory (WM). In an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we administered a modified version of the Sternberg probe recency task (Sternberg, 1966) to 43 young healthy volunteers, varying the level of interference across successive items. The task was divided into two parts (high vs. low interference) to induce either proactive or reactive control processes. The participants were separated into three groups according to their COMT Val158Met genotype [Val/Val (VV); Val/Met (VM); Met/Met (MM)]. The general aim of the study was to determine whether COMT polymorphism has a modulating effect on the neural substrates of interference resolution during WM processing. Results indicate that interfering trials were associated with greater involvement of frontal cortices (bilateral medial frontal gyrus, left precentral and superior frontal gyri, right inferior frontal gyrus) in VV homozygous subjects (by comparison to Met allele carriers) only in the proactive condition of the task. In addition, analysis of peristimulus haemodynamic responses (PSTH) revealed that the genotype-related difference observed in the left SFG was specifically driven by a larger increase in activity from the storage to the recognition phase of the interfering trials in VV homozygous subjects. These results confirm the impact of COMT genotype on inhibitory processes during a WM task, with an advantage for Met allele carriers. Interestingly, this impact on frontal areas is present only when the level of interference is high, and especially during the transition from storage to recognition in the left superior frontal gyrus. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailL’impact de la réserve cognitive sur le fonctionnement exécutif au cours du vieillissement normal
Simon, Jessica ULg; Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg

Conference (2014, December 05)

Le vieillissement normal s’accompagne d’un dysfonctionnement exécutif important. Or, on sait aujourd’hui qu’il existe une forte variabilité interindividuelle quant aux effets du vieillissement sur la ... [more ▼]

Le vieillissement normal s’accompagne d’un dysfonctionnement exécutif important. Or, on sait aujourd’hui qu’il existe une forte variabilité interindividuelle quant aux effets du vieillissement sur la cognition. Selon l’hypothèse de la réserve cognitive (Stern, 2009), les individus qui auraient développé un haut niveau de réserve résisteraient mieux aux effets du vieillissement que des individus de plus faible réserve cognitive. Dans cette étude, nous avons voulu mesurer l’impact des facteurs de réserve cognitive sur le fonctionnement exécutif au cours du vieillissement normal. Nous avons recruté 59 participants âgés de 60 à 80 ans, sans trouble cognitif ni neurologique. Nous leur avons proposé 8 tâches cognitives évaluant le fonctionnement exécutif : des épreuves d’inhibition (test de Stroop, test de Hayling, subtest Incompatibilité de la TAP), de flexibilité (subtest Flexibilité de la TAP, épreuve d’alternance arithmétique « plus-moins ») et de mise à jour (subtest Lettre-Chiffre de la MEM III, mise à jour de consonnes et tâche de 2-back). De plus, nous leur avons demandé de compléter différents questionnaires évaluant quatre facteurs de réserve cognitive (niveau d’études, parcours professionnel, activité physique et activités de loisir). Nous avons réparti nos participants en deux groupes en fonction de leur niveau de réserve cognitive (faible et haute). Des analyses de t de student (p<0.05) montrent que les participants avec une haute réserve cognitive ont de meilleures performances au subtest de mise à jour des consonnes (p=0,05) ainsi que des résultats quasi significatif pour le score composite de mise à jour (p=0,06) et le subtest de mise de consonnes (p=0,06). Nous avons aussi évalué l’impact spécifique de chaque facteur de réserve cognitive sur les performances au moyen de régressions simples (p<0.05). Les données montrent que le niveau d’étude explique une part significative de la variance du score composite de mise à jour et aux subtests Flexibilité et Lettre-Chiffre ainsi qu’une part quasi significative de la variance au score de mise à jour de consonnes. L’activité professionnelle au cours de la vie explique une part quasi-significative de la variance pour le score de mise à jour (p=0,07) et pour le test de mise à jour de consonnes (p=0,07). Enfin, les activités de loisir, quant à elles, expliquent une part significative de la variance des performances à la tâche du 2-back et une part quasi-significative de la variance des performances au test de Hayling (p=0.06). En conclusion, il apparait que les sujets âgés avec un haut niveau de réserve cognitive montrent de meilleures capacités à certains tests exécutifs uniquement. De plus, nos données suggèrent que tous les aspects du fonctionnement exécutif ne sont pas impactés de façon similaire par les différents facteurs de réserve cognitive. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (22 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailExecutive function and grey matter atrophy in healthy aging: A voxel-based morphometry analysis
Manard, Marine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2014, June)

Introduction Executive functioning is one of the cognitive domain that declines in healthy aging (Salthouse, Atkinson, & Berish, 2003). In addition, neuroimaging studies pointed out diverse ... [more ▼]

Introduction Executive functioning is one of the cognitive domain that declines in healthy aging (Salthouse, Atkinson, & Berish, 2003). In addition, neuroimaging studies pointed out diverse neurobiological modifications associated to normal aging, such as reduced grey and white matter volumes and cortical thickness (Raz & Rodrigue; 2006). In that context, Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM; Ashburner & Friston, 2000) and Partial Least Square (PLS; McIntoch at al., 1996, 2004) were used to investigate the effect of grey matter atrophy on executive abilities in normal aging. Methods Thirty six young (age range: 18-30) and 43 healthy older (age range: 60-78) adults were included in this study. Executive functioning was assessed by inhibition, updating and shifting tasks (Miyake et al., 2000), and a composite score for general executive ability was created. Structural high resolution T1-weighted images were acquired with a 3T head-only scanner using a standard transmit-receive quadrature head coil (Siemens, Allegra, Erlangen, Germany). The structural images were segmented using VBM8 toolbox, normalized to the MNI stereotaxic space and the resulting grey matter volume images were smoothed (Gaussian kernel: FWHM 8mm). PLS analyses were performed to determine regional grey matter volume differences between young and older adults, and next to identify the regional grey matter volumes specifically associated to executive performance in older participants (p<0.001). PLS is a validated multivariate approach that robustly identifies whole brain activity patterns correlated with behavioral data or experimental design (i.e., scores, conditions or tasks). Results Behavioral data showed a significant age-related decline in executive functioning (t=-5.43; p<.001). MRI analyses showed that significant age-related grey matter volume decrease was mostly observed across a large network including frontal, parietal, and temporal regions. Moreover significant positive correlations between the executive score and the grey matter volumes in older participants were found in a subset of these cortical areas: the inferior, middle and superior frontal cortex, the pre and postcentral gyri, the anterior and middle cingulate cortex, the inferior and superior parietal regions, the retrosplenial cortex, and finally, the inferior, middle and superior temporal regions. Discussion This study first replicated that executive abilities decline with age (Salthouse et al., 2003). This age-related executive decline is related to specific cerebral regions within a large fronto-temporo-parietal network sensitive to age. Interestingly, the areas whose atrophy is linked to executive abilities are quite similar to those evidenced in functional neuroimaging studies in young participants (see Collette & Van der Linden, 2002; Collette, Hogge, Salmon, & Van der Linden, 2006 for reviews). Therefore, using PLS multivariate analyses, we demonstrated that executive changes in normal aging are not dependent on atrophy in frontal areas only but rather comes from a grey matter volume decrease in a large antero-posterior brain network. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (8 ULg)
See detailQuantitative multi-parameter mapping in parkinson’s disease: preliminary results
Rouillard, Maud ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Albinet, Cedric et al

Poster (2014, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence du polymorphisme nucléotidique COMT sur la mémoire de travail et son vieillissement
Manard, Marine ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Revue de Neuropsychologie, Neurosciences Cognitives et Cliniques (2014), 6(4), 219-229

L’objectif de cette revue est de synthétiser les connaissances sur l’influence du polymorphisme nucléotidique Catéchol-O-Méthyltransférase (COMT) val108/158met sur la diminution des capacités de mémoire ... [more ▼]

L’objectif de cette revue est de synthétiser les connaissances sur l’influence du polymorphisme nucléotidique Catéchol-O-Méthyltransférase (COMT) val108/158met sur la diminution des capacités de mémoire de travail (et plus particulièrement de ses aspects exécutifs) associée à l’avancée en âge. Par son implication dans les processus de dégradation de la dopamine, notamment au niveau préfrontal, ce polymorphisme semble avoir un rôle central dans l’efficacité de la mise en œuvre de processus exécutifs. En effet, plusieurs études suggèrent un avantage phénotypique de l’allèle met du polymorphisme COMT lors de tâches exécutives requérant une stabilité des représentations cognitives. Etant donné les modifications cérébrales observées avec l’âge au niveau frontal, le polymorphisme COMT semble constituer une piste pertinente pour comprendre les altérations cognitives liées à l’âge. En effet, suite à la diminution d’efficacité du système dopaminergique, les personnes âgées présentent des déficits de mémoire de travail plus ou moins importants selon leur génotype pour le polymorphisme COMT. De plus, l’activité cérébrale associée à la réalisation de ces tâches va également varier en fonction de ce polymorphisme. Ces résultats soulignent l’intérêt d’intégrer les approches de génétique comportementale et de neuroimagerie génétique afin d’approfondir notre compréhension du vieillissement cognitif. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFonctionnement exécutif et réseaux cérébraux
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg

in Revue de Neuropsychologie, Neurosciences Cognitives et Cliniques (2014), 6(4), 256-266

Depuis les observations initiales de Luria [1], la localisation cérébrale du fonctionnement exécutif a fait l’objet de nombreux travaux de recherche. Dans un premier temps, les études de patients cérébro ... [more ▼]

Depuis les observations initiales de Luria [1], la localisation cérébrale du fonctionnement exécutif a fait l’objet de nombreux travaux de recherche. Dans un premier temps, les études de patients cérébro-lésés ont mis en évidence l’implication prédominante des régions frontales. Avec l’avènement des techniques modernes d’imagerie cérébrale (tomographie à émission de positons [TEP] et imagerie par résonnance magnétique fonctionnelle [IRMf], il est toutefois apparu que le fonctionnement exécutif était sous-tendu par un réseau antéro-postérieur largement distribué. Dès ce moment, l’attention s’est portée sur le rôle exact des différentes régions impliquées lors de la réalisation d’épreuves exécutives et sur l’importance relative des régions antérieures et postérieures. Plus récemment, l’étude du fonctionnement exécutif en tant que réseau de régions fonctionnellement connectées s’est développée, et on a également commencé à s’intéresser à l’influence des aspects cérébraux structurels et des caractéristiques génétiques. Les résultats de ces travaux soulignent l’aspect interactif et fortement modulable du fonctionnement exécutif au niveau cérébral, et la nécessité de prendre en compte simultanément différents niveaux d’analyse. Nous aborderons dans cette revue ces différentes thématiques, en nous centrant sur les données issues d’études chez le sujet jeune et sain pour des raisons de concision. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffet de l’âge et du type d’encodage en mémoire épisodique
Hagelstein, Catherine; François, Sarah ULg; Manard, Marine ULg et al

Poster (2014)

Introduction. Lors du vieillissement, on observe une diminution des capacités mémoire épisodique (a), se caractérisant par une diminution de la recollection (b). Dans cette étude, nous nous sommes ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Lors du vieillissement, on observe une diminution des capacités mémoire épisodique (a), se caractérisant par une diminution de la recollection (b). Dans cette étude, nous nous sommes intéressés à l'influence des consignes d'encodage, intentionnelles ou incidentes, sur la performance de participants jeunes et âgés à une tâche de mémoire épisodique. Méthodologie. Vingt volontaires jeunes (18-30 ans) et 20 volontaires âgés (61-72 ans) ont participé à cette expérience. Le matériel se composait de 300 dessins en noir et blanc représentant des objets de la vie courante. La tâche se déroulait en deux étapes. Lors de la phase d'encodage, 100 items étaient présentés une seule fois (condition «difficile») et 100 autres items étaient présentés deux fois (condition «facile»). Lors de la reconnaissance, les items de la phase d’encodage étaient à nouveaux présentés, ainsi que 100 nouveaux items. Dans chaque groupe d'âge, la moitié des participants effectuait la tâche d'encodage en recevant une consigne d'encodage incident (jugement sur la taille de l'objet) tandis qu'il était explicitement demandé à l'autre moitié de mémoriser les objets qui leur étaient présentés en vue d'un test de mémoire (encodage intentionnel). Lors de la reconnaissance, les participants effectuaient un jugement de type Recollection-Familiarité pour les items qu'ils estimaient avoir vu précédemment. Nous avons réalisé des ANOVAs afin de tester l'influence des consignes, du groupe d'âge et du nombre de répétitions de l'item d'une part sur le pourcentage de réponses de type Recollection et d'autre part sur le pourcentage de réponses de type Familiarité (p<0,05). Résultats et discussion. Les analyses montrent un effet significatif de l'âge, avec un pourcentage de réponses correctes de type "recollection" plus élevé chez les sujets jeunes, tandis qu'on observe un plus grand pourcentage de réponses correctes de type "familiarité" chez les sujets âgés. De plus, les résultats montrent que les stimuli présentés deux fois produisent plus de réponses de type "recollection" que ceux présentés une seule fois. Finalement, les données suggèrent également que, pour la condition "facile" uniquement, dans le groupe de sujets âgés, les consignes d'encodage intentionnel mènent à plus de recollection et moins de familiarité. Ces résultats sont compatibles avec les travaux montrant que les personnes âgées ont des difficultés à mettre spontanément en place des stratégies d'encodage élaboré, et qu'elles ont besoin de davantage de soutien (ici sous la forme d'une deuxième exposition au matériel) pour mener à bien un encodage profond lorsqu'elles y sont encouragées par des instructions d'apprentissage intentionnel (c). Références (a) Cappell, K. A., Gmeindl, L., & Reuter-Lorenz, P. A. (2010). Age differences in prefontal recruitment during verbal working memory maintenance depend on memory load. Cortex, 46(4), 462-473. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2009.11.009 (b) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (c) Froger, C., Bouazzaoui, B., Isingrini, M., & Taconnat, L. (2012). Study time allocation deficit of older adults: the role of environmental support at encoding? Psychology and Aging, 27(3), 577-588. doi: 10.1037/a0026358 [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffet de l’âge sur l’encodage en mémoire épisodique en fonction de l’expérience recollective à la reconnaissance: étude en IRMf
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2014)

Introduction. Il est désormais communément admis que l'avancée en âge s'accompagne d'un déclin en mémoire épisodique. Plus précisément, il semblerait que, contrairement aux processus de familiarité, les ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Il est désormais communément admis que l'avancée en âge s'accompagne d'un déclin en mémoire épisodique. Plus précisément, il semblerait que, contrairement aux processus de familiarité, les processus de recollection soient particulièrement touchés (a). Chez les sujets âgés, l'encodage semble requérir une activation préfrontale bilatérale lorsqu'il est réussi, tandis que chez les sujets jeunes cette activation est latéralisée à gauche (b). Dans cette étude, nous nous sommes intéressés aux différences d'activité cérébrale entre participants jeunes et âgés lors de l'encodage en fonction du statut attribué à l'item au moment de la reconnaissance (Recollection ou Familiarité). Méthodologie. Vingt sujets jeunes (entre 19 et 29 ans) et 19 sujets âgés (entre 60 et 78 ans) ont été confrontés, lors d'un examen en IRMf, à des stimuli visuels représentant des objets à propos desquels ils devaient effectuer des jugements de taille. Lors d'une seconde phase, on présentait à nouveau aux volontaires les stimuli de la phase d'encodage ainsi que des items distracteurs. Il leur était demandé de déterminer lesquels étaient nouveaux et lesquels avaient été présentés précédemment. Parmi ces derniers, les participants effectuaient également un jugement de type Recollection- Familiarité. Les analyses statistiques ont été réalisées au moyen du logiciel SPM8, avec un plan évènementiel comparant les modifications d’activité cérébrale entre nos deux groupes de sujets lors de l’encodage (1) pour les items ayant donné lieu à un processus de recollection lors de la phase de reconnaissance par rapport à ceux associés à de la familiarité (processus de Recollection), (2) pour les items associés à de la familiarité lors de la reconnaissance par rapport à ceux non-reconnus (processus de Familiarité). Résultats. La mise en jeu de processus de recollection lors de la récupération est spécifiquement associée lors de l'encodage, chez les sujets âgés à des augmentations d'activité au niveau du gyrus frontal moyen droit, des gyri cingulaire et paracingulaire médians gauches, ainsi qu'au niveau du précuneus de manière bilatérale. Par contre, aucune activité cérébrale plus importante lors de l’encodage n’était observée dans le groupe de sujets âgés pour les items ayant induit un processus de familiarité lors de la récupération Discussion. Parmi ces régions, le précuneus semble intervenir pour favoriser des processus compensatoires permettant aux seniors d’améliorer la richesse de l’encodage, ainsi qu’il a été précédemment suggéré pour les processus de recollection lors de la récupération(c). Au contraire, les processus de familiarité, moins exigeants en ressources attentionnelles, ne semblent pas recruter de tels processus de compensation. Références (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Duverne, S., Motamedinia, S., & Rugg, M. D. (2009). The relationship between aging, performance, and the neural correlates of successful memory encoding. Cerebral Cortex, 19(3), 733-744. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhn122 (c) Angel, L., Bastin, C., Genon, S., Balteau, E., Phillips, C., Luxen, A., . . . Collette, F. (2013). Differential effects of aging on the neural correlates of recollection and familiarity. Cortex, 49(6), 1585-1597. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2012.10.002 [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2014)

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods:Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5;20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memorytask in 13successivefMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results:We tested for a group (PER3 5/5>PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the first evening WMZ(i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative toPER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responsesin the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions:These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences wereobserved in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014), 23(1), 61

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods: Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5; 20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent 42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memory task in 13 successive fMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results: We tested for a group (PER3 5/5 > PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the fi rst evening WMZ (i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40 h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative to PER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responses in the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions: These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences were observed in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of COMT Genotype on Antero-Posterior Cortical Functional Connectivity Underlying Interference Resolution
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Manard, Marine ULg; DIDEBERG, Vinciane ULg et al

in Cerebral Cortex (2014)

Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of executive functioning and its neural correlates ... [more ▼]

Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of executive functioning and its neural correlates. However, this attention has generally centred on the prefrontal cortices because of the well-known direct impact of COMT enzyme on these cerebral regions. In this study, we were interested in the modulating effect of COMT genotype on anterior and posterior brain areas underlying interference resolution during a Stroop task. More specifically, we were interested in the functional connectivity between the right inferior frontal operculum (IFop), an area frequently associated with inhibitory efficiency, and posterior brain regions involved in reading/naming processes (the two main non-executive determinants of the Stroop effect). The Stroop task was administered during fMRI scanning to three groups of 15 young adults divided according to their COMT Val158Met genotype [Val/Val (VV), Val/Met (VM) and Met/Met (MM)]. Results indicate greater activity in the right IFop and the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG) in homozygous VV individuals than in Met allele carriers. In addition, the VV group exhibited stronger positive functional connectivity between these two brain regions and stronger negative connectivity between the right IFop and left lingual gyrus. These results confirm the impact of COMT genotype on frontal function. They also strongly suggest that differences in frontal activity influence posterior brain regions related to a non-executive component of the task. Especially, changes in functional connectivity between anterior and posterior brain areas might correspond to compensatory processes for performing the task efficiently when the available dopamine level is low. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (17 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSeasonal variation in human executive brain responses
Meyer, Christelle ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Poster (2014)

It is well established that cognition shows daily fluctuations with changes in circadian phase and sleep pressure. The physiological impact of season changes, which is well characterized in animals ... [more ▼]

It is well established that cognition shows daily fluctuations with changes in circadian phase and sleep pressure. The physiological impact of season changes, which is well characterized in animals, remains largely unexplored in human. Here we investigated the impact of seasonal variation on human cognitive brain function. This cross-sectional study,conducted in Liège (Belgium),spanned from May 2010 to October 2011. Following 8h in-lab baseline night of sleep, 30 volunteers (age 20.9+1.5; 15F)spent 42h awake under constant routine conditions(<5lux, semi-recumbent position, no time-cues). After12h recovery night, they underwent15minfMRI recording while performing a working memory 3-back task (3b) and a letter detection 0-back task (0b). Thus, fMRI data were acquired when volunteers had been in isolation under controlled conditionsfor 63h. Executive brain responses were isolated by subtracting 0b activity from 3b responses (3b>0b).Analysis tested seasonal influence on executive brain responses at the random effects level, using a phasoranalysis across the year.Inferences were conducted at p<0.05, after correction for multiple comparisons over a priori small volume of interest. Significanteffects of season on executive responses were detected inmiddle frontal and frontopolarregions, insula, and thalamus, with a maximum response at the end of summer and a minimum response at the end of winter.These brain areas are key regions for executive control and alertness. These results constitute the first demonstration that seasonality directly impacts on human cognitive brain functions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (6 ULg)