References of "Collette, Fabienne"
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See detailBrain metabolic dysfunction in Capgras delusion during Alzheimer’s disease: a positron emission tomography study
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Daury, Noémy; Rémi, Capa et al

in American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias (in press)

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since ... [more ▼]

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since little is known regarding the neural correlates of Capgras syndrome, the cerebral metabolic pattern of a patient with probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Capgras syndrome was compared with those of 24 healthy elderly subjects and 26 AD patients without delusional syndrome. Compared to the healthy and AD groups, the patient had significant hypometabolism in frontal and posterior midline structures. In light of current neural models of face perception, our patient’s Capgras syndrome may be related to impaired recognition of a familiar face, subserved by the posterior cingulate/precuneus cortex, and impaired reflection about personally relevant knowledge related to a face, subserved by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of ageing and encoding instructions on episodic memory
Hagelstein, Catherine ULg; François, Sarah ULg; Manard, Marine ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

During ageing, a decline in episodic memory is observed, characterized by decreased recollection (a). In this study, we investigated the influence of encoding instructions, intentional or incidental, on ... [more ▼]

During ageing, a decline in episodic memory is observed, characterized by decreased recollection (a). In this study, we investigated the influence of encoding instructions, intentional or incidental, on the performance of younger and older adults during an episodic memory task. Twenty young volunteers (aged 18 to 30 years old) and 20 older volunteers (aged 61 to 72 years old) participated in this experiment. The stimuli consisted of 300 black-and-white drawings of common objects. The task comprised two steps. During the encoding phase, 100 items were presented once ("hard" condition) and 100 other items were presented twice ("easy" condition). During recognition, the items from the encoding phase were presented again, as well as 100 new items. In each age group, half of the participants received incidental encoding instructions (they had to make size judgements about the objects depicted) while the other half were explicitly asked to memorize the objects presented because they would be asked to recognize them later on (intentional encoding). During recognition, they performed a Remember-Know judgement for the items they believed they had seen earlier. We carried out ANOVAs in order to test for the influence of instructions, age group and number of repetitions of the items in one hand on the percentage of recollection and on the other hand on the percentage of familiarity (p<.05). Results show a significant effect of age, with more correct recollection responses in young adults, whereas more correct familiarity was found in older adults. Furthermore, it was found that the items presented twice lead to more recollection than those presented only once. Finally, these results also suggest that in the older group of participants, only for the items presented twice, intentional encoding instructions lead to more recollection and less familiarity. This finding is consistent with previous work showing that the elderly do not easily use elaborate encoding strategies, and that they need more support (here, a second exposition to the material) in order to perform a deep encoding when they are encouraged to do so with intentional learning instructions (b). (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Froger, C., Bouazzaoui, B., Isingrini, M., & Taconnat, L. (2012). Study time allocation deficit of older adults: the role of environmental support at encoding? Psychology and Aging, 27(3), 577-588. doi:10.1037/a0026358 [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of ageing on episodic memory encoding: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear ... [more ▼]

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear to recruit prefrontal areas bilaterally when their encoding is successful, while in young adults this activation is found to be left-lateralized (b). In this study, we were interested in the differences between younger and older participant regarding cerebral activity during encoding depending on whether the item elicited recollection or familiarity during the recognition phase. Twenty young volunteers (aged 19 to 29 years old) and 19 older volunteers (aged 60 to 78 years old) were presented visual stimuli depicting objects. During a first fMRI session, they were asked to make a size judgement about them. Then, in a second phase, the subjects were shown the items previously encountered during the encoding phase, as well as distractors. Participants' task was to determine which one were new and which one were seen earlier. For the latter, they also performed a Remember-Know judgement. Data were analysed using SPM8, with an event design comparing modifications in cerebral activity between the two subjects groups during encoding (1) for the items leading to recollection during the recognition phase compared to those leading to familiarity, and (2) for the items associated with familiarity during the recognition phase compared to those which were not recognized. Results show that older adults display a heightened activity in the right middle frontal gyrus, medial cingulate and paracingulate left gyri as well as in the precuneus, bilaterally when they engage recollection processes. Given that activations in these areas did not correlate with performance, they could be interepreted either as dedifferentiation or as an attempt of the ageing brain to compensate for a less elaborate encoding. However, no increase of activity was associated with familiarity processes in older adults, possibly because they are less demanding regarding attentional resources. (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Duverne, S., Motamedinia, S., & Rugg, M. D. (2009). The relationship between aging, performance, and the neural correlates of successful memory encoding. Cerebral Cortex, 19(3), 733-744. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhn122 [less ▲]

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See detailExecutive functions in normal aging: Impact of cognitive reserve and objective physical activity
Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; Simon, Jessica ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg

Poster (2015, May 28)

It is now acknowledged that there exists a large inter-individual variability in age-related cognitive changes. According to Stern (2009), the cognitive reserve built up throughout the life span will make ... [more ▼]

It is now acknowledged that there exists a large inter-individual variability in age-related cognitive changes. According to Stern (2009), the cognitive reserve built up throughout the life span will make seniors more or less resilient to the deleterious effects of aging on cognition, with seniors having a high level of cognitive reserve being more prone to successfully cope with cognitive and neuronal changes. Currently, few studies have focused on the specific effects of different factors of cognitive reserve on cognition. Consequently, the objective of this study is to determine the impact of four determinants of cognitive reserve on executive functions in normal aging. Sixty-eight healthy participants aged 60 to 80 were enrolled. Regarding executive functions, Inhibition (Stroop test, Hayling test, TAP Incompatibility subtest), Shifting (TAP Flexibility subtest, Plus-Minus task), and Updating (Letter-Number Sequencing subtest from MEM III, Letter memory task, 2-back task) were assessed (Miyake et al., 2000). Cognitive reserve was measured by questionnaires assessing educational level, occupation, leisure activities and physical activity. Moreover, an accelerometer allowed quantitative measure of physical activity by recording body movements during two weeks. Group comparisons (p<0.05) showed that seniors with a high level of cognitive reserve (measured by a global composite z-score) have better updating abilities (Letter memory task and updating composite score). In order to test the influence of each cognitive reserve factor on executive functions, simple linear regressions (p<0.05) were performed. The results showed that the educational level accounts for a significant part of the variance in flexibility (TAP Flexibility) and updating (Letter-Number sequencing, 2-back and composite score). The occupational level accounts significantly for the variance of the updating composite score. Regarding the quantitative physical activity, the mean number of minutes per day in moderate or intense physical activity significantly predicted the updating composite score. These results indicate that the level of cognitive reserve is related to abilities in some executive tests, particularly updating abilities. Importantly, all aspects of cognitive reserve are not associated with the three executive processes. This indicates a specificity of the protective effect of cognitive reserve on executive abilities. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural bases of proactive and reactive control processes in healthy aging
Manard, Marine ULg; François, Sarah ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

Background. Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities (an anticipatory form of control) whereas reactive control (consecutive to conflict detection ... [more ▼]

Background. Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities (an anticipatory form of control) whereas reactive control (consecutive to conflict detection) seems to remain intact [1]. As proactive and reactive control abilities were associated to specific brain networks [2], this study investigated age-related effects on the neural substrates associated to each kind of control. Method. A modified form of the Stroop task was administered to 16 young and 16 older adults in an event-related fMRI experiment. In this version of the Stroop task, three different contexts were created: (1) a mostly congruent context (MC, inducing reactive control) with a majority of congruent items, (2) a mostly incongruent context (MI, inducing proactive control) with mainly interfering items, (3) a neutral context (MN) with mainly neutral items. Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed with SPM8 (p<.001 uncorrected). Results. Behavioral results (p<0.05) indicated faster processing of interferent items in the MI than MC context in young participants only. With regard to neuroimaging data, the comparison of the two groups showed that the processing of interferent items in the MI context is associated to decreased activity in (mainly right-sided) frontal and temporal areas in the older group. On the contrary, in the MC context, increased activity was observed in bilateral frontal areas for older compared to younger participants. Discussion. Behavioral results confirm that older participants have difficulties with the implementation of proactive control that is associated to decreased brain activity (compared to young participants) in areas underlying Stroop performance. However, the recruitment of supplementary frontal areas we observed in the reactive control condition suggests compensation processes. So, aging seems to differentially affect the neural networks associated to the various kinds of cognitive control. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of ageing on episodic memory encoding: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 21)

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear ... [more ▼]

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear to recruit prefrontal areas bilaterally when their encoding is successful, while in young adults this activation is found to be left-lateralized (b). In this study, we were interested in the differences between younger and older participant regarding cerebral activity during encoding depending on whether the item elicited recollection or familiarity during the recognition phase. Twenty young volunteers (aged 19 to 29 years old) and 19 older volunteers (aged 60 to 78 years old) were presented visual stimuli depicting objects. During a first fMRI session, they were asked to make a size judgement about them. Then, in a second phase, the subjects were shown the items previously encountered during the encoding phase, as well as distractors. Participants' task was to determine which one were new and which one were seen earlier. For the latter, they also performed a Remember-Know judgement. Data were analysed using SPM8, with an event design comparing modifications in cerebral activity between the two subjects groups during encoding (1) for the items leading to recollection during the recognition phase compared to those leading to familiarity, and (2) for the items associated with familiarity during the recognition phase compared to those which were not recognized. Results show that older adults display a heightened activity in the right middle frontal gyrus, medial cingulate and paracingulate left gyri as well as in the precuneus, bilaterally when they engage recollection processes. Amongst those regions, the precuneus seems to underlie compensatory processes, allowing the elderly to perform a richer encoding, as it was previously suggested for recollection processes during recall (c). However, no increase in activity was associated with familiarity processes in older adults, possibly because they are less demanding regarding attentional resources. (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Duverne, S., Motamedinia, S., & Rugg, M. D. (2009). The relationship between aging, performance, and the neural correlates of successful memory encoding. Cerebral Cortex, 19(3), 733-744. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhn122 (c) Angel, L., Bastin, C., Genon, S., Balteau, E., Phillips, C., Luxen, A., . . . Collette, F. (2013). Differential effects of aging on the neural correlates of recollection and familiarity. Cortex, 49(6), 1585-1597. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2012.10.002 [less ▲]

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See detailFonctionnement exécutif et attentionnel consécutif à des lésions cérébrales acquises : une analyse de cas multiples
Hogge, Michael; Salmon, Eric ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Revue de Neuropsychologie, Neurosciences Cognitives et Cliniques (2015), 7(2), 71-99

Le fonctionnement exécutif a été conceptualisé comme un ensemble de processus cognitifs de haut niveau pouvant être clairement distingués, et dont le substrat cérébral se situerait au sein des régions ... [more ▼]

Le fonctionnement exécutif a été conceptualisé comme un ensemble de processus cognitifs de haut niveau pouvant être clairement distingués, et dont le substrat cérébral se situerait au sein des régions frontales. Un certain nombre de données obtenues notamment chez des patients présentant des lésions cérébrales acquises sont toutefois venues remettre en question cette conceptualisation. Dans ce contexte, nous avons administré une large batterie d’épreuves exécutives et attentionnelles à un petit groupe de patients cérébro-lésés (N=9) afin de déterminer, au moyen d’analyses de cas multiples, l’influence de la localisation et de l’étendue des lésions, ainsi que l’influence de difficultés attentionnelles, sur la survenue d’un syndrome dysexécutif. Les analyses de profils individuels semblent indiquer qu’un mauvais transfert d’information entre régions cérébrales antérieures et postérieures serait responsable de la survenue de troubles exécutifs, et que, dans certains cas, ce soient des difficultés attentionnelles qui déterminent ces déficits. Toutefois, il se pourrait également que l’atteinte de certaines régions clés (relativement focalisées) sous-tendant des processus cognitifs impliqués dans un large éventail de tâches exécutives soit responsable de la survenue d’un dysfonctionnement exécutif massif. [less ▲]

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See detailModulating effect of COMT Val158Met polymorphism on interference resolution during a working memory task
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; DIDEBERG, Vinciane ULg; Bours, Vincent ULg et al

in Brain & Cognition (2015), 95

Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene has received increasing attention in the last 15 years, in particular as a potential modulator of the neural substrates ... [more ▼]

Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene has received increasing attention in the last 15 years, in particular as a potential modulator of the neural substrates underlying inhibitory processes and updating in working memory (WM). In an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we administered a modified version of the Sternberg probe recency task (Sternberg, 1966) to 43 young healthy volunteers, varying the level of interference across successive items. The task was divided into two parts (high vs. low interference) to induce either proactive or reactive control processes. The participants were separated into three groups according to their COMT Val158Met genotype [Val/Val (VV); Val/Met (VM); Met/Met (MM)]. The general aim of the study was to determine whether COMT polymorphism has a modulating effect on the neural substrates of interference resolution during WM processing. Results indicate that interfering trials were associated with greater involvement of frontal cortices (bilateral medial frontal gyrus, left precentral and superior frontal gyri, right inferior frontal gyrus) in VV homozygous subjects (by comparison to Met allele carriers) only in the proactive condition of the task. In addition, analysis of peristimulus haemodynamic responses (PSTH) revealed that the genotype-related difference observed in the left SFG was specifically driven by a larger increase in activity from the storage to the recognition phase of the interfering trials in VV homozygous subjects. These results confirm the impact of COMT genotype on inhibitory processes during a WM task, with an advantage for Met allele carriers. Interestingly, this impact on frontal areas is present only when the level of interference is high, and especially during the transition from storage to recognition in the left superior frontal gyrus. [less ▲]

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See detailL’impact de la réserve cognitive sur le fonctionnement exécutif au cours du vieillissement normal
Simon, Jessica ULg; Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg

Conference (2014, December 05)

Le vieillissement normal s’accompagne d’un dysfonctionnement exécutif important. Or, on sait aujourd’hui qu’il existe une forte variabilité interindividuelle quant aux effets du vieillissement sur la ... [more ▼]

Le vieillissement normal s’accompagne d’un dysfonctionnement exécutif important. Or, on sait aujourd’hui qu’il existe une forte variabilité interindividuelle quant aux effets du vieillissement sur la cognition. Selon l’hypothèse de la réserve cognitive (Stern, 2009), les individus qui auraient développé un haut niveau de réserve résisteraient mieux aux effets du vieillissement que des individus de plus faible réserve cognitive. Dans cette étude, nous avons voulu mesurer l’impact des facteurs de réserve cognitive sur le fonctionnement exécutif au cours du vieillissement normal. Nous avons recruté 59 participants âgés de 60 à 80 ans, sans trouble cognitif ni neurologique. Nous leur avons proposé 8 tâches cognitives évaluant le fonctionnement exécutif : des épreuves d’inhibition (test de Stroop, test de Hayling, subtest Incompatibilité de la TAP), de flexibilité (subtest Flexibilité de la TAP, épreuve d’alternance arithmétique « plus-moins ») et de mise à jour (subtest Lettre-Chiffre de la MEM III, mise à jour de consonnes et tâche de 2-back). De plus, nous leur avons demandé de compléter différents questionnaires évaluant quatre facteurs de réserve cognitive (niveau d’études, parcours professionnel, activité physique et activités de loisir). Nous avons réparti nos participants en deux groupes en fonction de leur niveau de réserve cognitive (faible et haute). Des analyses de t de student (p<0.05) montrent que les participants avec une haute réserve cognitive ont de meilleures performances au subtest de mise à jour des consonnes (p=0,05) ainsi que des résultats quasi significatif pour le score composite de mise à jour (p=0,06) et le subtest de mise de consonnes (p=0,06). Nous avons aussi évalué l’impact spécifique de chaque facteur de réserve cognitive sur les performances au moyen de régressions simples (p<0.05). Les données montrent que le niveau d’étude explique une part significative de la variance du score composite de mise à jour et aux subtests Flexibilité et Lettre-Chiffre ainsi qu’une part quasi significative de la variance au score de mise à jour de consonnes. L’activité professionnelle au cours de la vie explique une part quasi-significative de la variance pour le score de mise à jour (p=0,07) et pour le test de mise à jour de consonnes (p=0,07). Enfin, les activités de loisir, quant à elles, expliquent une part significative de la variance des performances à la tâche du 2-back et une part quasi-significative de la variance des performances au test de Hayling (p=0.06). En conclusion, il apparait que les sujets âgés avec un haut niveau de réserve cognitive montrent de meilleures capacités à certains tests exécutifs uniquement. De plus, nos données suggèrent que tous les aspects du fonctionnement exécutif ne sont pas impactés de façon similaire par les différents facteurs de réserve cognitive. [less ▲]

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See detailExecutive function and grey matter atrophy in healthy aging: A voxel-based morphometry analysis
Manard, Marine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2014, June)

Introduction Executive functioning is one of the cognitive domain that declines in healthy aging (Salthouse, Atkinson, & Berish, 2003). In addition, neuroimaging studies pointed out diverse ... [more ▼]

Introduction Executive functioning is one of the cognitive domain that declines in healthy aging (Salthouse, Atkinson, & Berish, 2003). In addition, neuroimaging studies pointed out diverse neurobiological modifications associated to normal aging, such as reduced grey and white matter volumes and cortical thickness (Raz & Rodrigue; 2006). In that context, Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM; Ashburner & Friston, 2000) and Partial Least Square (PLS; McIntoch at al., 1996, 2004) were used to investigate the effect of grey matter atrophy on executive abilities in normal aging. Methods Thirty six young (age range: 18-30) and 43 healthy older (age range: 60-78) adults were included in this study. Executive functioning was assessed by inhibition, updating and shifting tasks (Miyake et al., 2000), and a composite score for general executive ability was created. Structural high resolution T1-weighted images were acquired with a 3T head-only scanner using a standard transmit-receive quadrature head coil (Siemens, Allegra, Erlangen, Germany). The structural images were segmented using VBM8 toolbox, normalized to the MNI stereotaxic space and the resulting grey matter volume images were smoothed (Gaussian kernel: FWHM 8mm). PLS analyses were performed to determine regional grey matter volume differences between young and older adults, and next to identify the regional grey matter volumes specifically associated to executive performance in older participants (p<0.001). PLS is a validated multivariate approach that robustly identifies whole brain activity patterns correlated with behavioral data or experimental design (i.e., scores, conditions or tasks). Results Behavioral data showed a significant age-related decline in executive functioning (t=-5.43; p<.001). MRI analyses showed that significant age-related grey matter volume decrease was mostly observed across a large network including frontal, parietal, and temporal regions. Moreover significant positive correlations between the executive score and the grey matter volumes in older participants were found in a subset of these cortical areas: the inferior, middle and superior frontal cortex, the pre and postcentral gyri, the anterior and middle cingulate cortex, the inferior and superior parietal regions, the retrosplenial cortex, and finally, the inferior, middle and superior temporal regions. Discussion This study first replicated that executive abilities decline with age (Salthouse et al., 2003). This age-related executive decline is related to specific cerebral regions within a large fronto-temporo-parietal network sensitive to age. Interestingly, the areas whose atrophy is linked to executive abilities are quite similar to those evidenced in functional neuroimaging studies in young participants (see Collette & Van der Linden, 2002; Collette, Hogge, Salmon, & Van der Linden, 2006 for reviews). Therefore, using PLS multivariate analyses, we demonstrated that executive changes in normal aging are not dependent on atrophy in frontal areas only but rather comes from a grey matter volume decrease in a large antero-posterior brain network. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative multi-parameter mapping in parkinson’s disease: preliminary results
Rouillard, Maud ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Albinet, Cedric et al

Poster (2014, May)

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See detailDorsomedial prefrontal metabolism and unawareness of current characteristics of personality traits in Alzheimer’s disease
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (2014), 9(10), 1458-1463

Anosognosia is a complex symptom corresponding to a lack of awareness of one’s current clinical status. Anosognosia for cognitive deficits has frequently been described in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), while ... [more ▼]

Anosognosia is a complex symptom corresponding to a lack of awareness of one’s current clinical status. Anosognosia for cognitive deficits has frequently been described in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), while unawareness of current characteristics of personality traits has rarely been considered. We used a well-established questionnaire-based method in a group of 37 AD patients and in healthy controls to probe self- and hetero-evaluation of patients’ personality and we calculated differential scores between each participant’s and his/her relative’s judgments. A brain-behavior correlation was performed using FDG-PET images. The behavioral data showed that AD patients presented with anosognosia for current characteristics of their personality and their anosognosia was primarily explained by impaired third perspective taking. The brain-behavior correlation analysis revealed a negative relationship between anosognosia for current characteristics of personality and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC) activity. Behavioral and neuroimaging data are consistent with the view that impairment of different functions subserved by the dMPFC (self-evaluation, inferences regarding complex enduring dispositions of self and others, confrontation of perspectives in interpersonal scripts) plays a role in anosognosia for current characteristics of personality in AD patients. [less ▲]

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See detailLes effets du vieillissement normal et pathologique sur la cognition
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(5-6), 265-269

Des troubles cognitifs touchant principalement le fonctionnement exécutif et mnésique sont observés lors du vieillissement normal et de la maladie d’Alzheimer, et sont associés à des changements au niveau ... [more ▼]

Des troubles cognitifs touchant principalement le fonctionnement exécutif et mnésique sont observés lors du vieillissement normal et de la maladie d’Alzheimer, et sont associés à des changements au niveau de l’activité cérébrale. Il apparait toutefois que différents facteurs sont susceptibles de retarder la survenue des troubles cognitifs, tels que la stimulation mentale ou la pratique d’une activité physique. De même, les prises en charge cognitives permettent d’améliorer le fonctionnement au quotidien des patients présentant une maladie d’Alzheimer (MA). Identifier les facteurs et techniques qui contribuent à maintenir une vitalité cognitive et/ou à contrer les effets de la MA permettront d’optimiser la qualité de vie des seniors. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Role of Memory Traces Quality in Directed Forgetting: A Comparison of Young and Older Participants
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Grandjean, Julien; Lorant, Caroline ULg et al

in Psychologica Belgica (2014), 54(4), 310-327

The presence of a reduced directed-forgetting (DF) effect in normal aging has been frequently observed with the item method. These results were interpreted as age-related difficulties in inhibiting the ... [more ▼]

The presence of a reduced directed-forgetting (DF) effect in normal aging has been frequently observed with the item method. These results were interpreted as age-related difficulties in inhibiting the processing of irrelevant information. However, since the performance of older adults is usually lower on items to remember, the age effect on DF abilities could also be interpreted as reflecting memory problems. Consequently, the present study aimed at investigating the influence of memory traces quality on the magnitude of the DF effects in normal aging. We predicted that increasing the quality of memory traces (by increasing presentation times at encoding) would be associated with attenuated DF effects in older participants due to the increased difficulty of inhibiting highly activated memory traces. A classical item-method DF paradigm was administered to 48 young and 48 older participants under short and long encoding conditions. Memory performance for information to memorize and to suppress was assessed with recall and recognition procedures, as well as with a Remember/Know/Guess (RKG) paradigm. The results indicated that, when memory traces are equated between groups, DF effects observed with the recall, recognition and RKG procedures are of similar amplitude in both groups (all ps>0.05). This suggests that the decreased DF effect previously observed in older adults might not actually depend on their inhibitory abilities but may rather reflect quantitative and qualitative differences in episodic memory functioning. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence du polymorphisme nucléotidique COMT sur la mémoire de travail et son vieillissement
Manard, Marine ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Revue de Neuropsychologie, Neurosciences Cognitives et Cliniques (2014), 6(4), 219-229

L’objectif de cette revue est de synthétiser les connaissances sur l’influence du polymorphisme nucléotidique Catéchol-O-Méthyltransférase (COMT) val108/158met sur la diminution des capacités de mémoire ... [more ▼]

L’objectif de cette revue est de synthétiser les connaissances sur l’influence du polymorphisme nucléotidique Catéchol-O-Méthyltransférase (COMT) val108/158met sur la diminution des capacités de mémoire de travail (et plus particulièrement de ses aspects exécutifs) associée à l’avancée en âge. Par son implication dans les processus de dégradation de la dopamine, notamment au niveau préfrontal, ce polymorphisme semble avoir un rôle central dans l’efficacité de la mise en œuvre de processus exécutifs. En effet, plusieurs études suggèrent un avantage phénotypique de l’allèle met du polymorphisme COMT lors de tâches exécutives requérant une stabilité des représentations cognitives. Etant donné les modifications cérébrales observées avec l’âge au niveau frontal, le polymorphisme COMT semble constituer une piste pertinente pour comprendre les altérations cognitives liées à l’âge. En effet, suite à la diminution d’efficacité du système dopaminergique, les personnes âgées présentent des déficits de mémoire de travail plus ou moins importants selon leur génotype pour le polymorphisme COMT. De plus, l’activité cérébrale associée à la réalisation de ces tâches va également varier en fonction de ce polymorphisme. Ces résultats soulignent l’intérêt d’intégrer les approches de génétique comportementale et de neuroimagerie génétique afin d’approfondir notre compréhension du vieillissement cognitif. [less ▲]

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