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See detailCrystal Structure of the Extended-Spectrum β -Lactamase PER-2 and Insights into the Role of Specific Residues in the Interaction with β -Lactams and β -Lactamase Inhibitors
Ruggiero, Melina; Kerff, Frédéric ULg; Herman, Raphaël ULg et al

in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2014), 58(10), 5994-6002

PER-2 belongs to a small (7 members to date) group of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases. It has 88% amino acid identity with PER-1 and both display high catalytic efficiencies toward most beta-lactams. In ... [more ▼]

PER-2 belongs to a small (7 members to date) group of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases. It has 88% amino acid identity with PER-1 and both display high catalytic efficiencies toward most beta-lactams. In this study, we determined the X-ray structure of PER-2 at 2.20 A and evaluated the possible role of several residues in the structure and activity toward beta-lactams and mechanism-based inhibitors. PER-2 is defined by the presence of a singular trans bond between residues 166 to 167, which generates an inverted Omega loop, an expanded fold of this domain that results in a wide active site cavity that allows for efficient hydrolysis of antibiotics like the oxyimino-cephalosporins, and a series of exclusive interactions between residues not frequently involved in the stabilization of the active site in other class A beta-lactamases. PER beta-lactamases might be included within a cluster of evolutionarily related enzymes harboring the conserved residues Asp136 and Asn179. Other signature residues that define these enzymes seem to be Gln69, Arg220, Thr237, and probably Arg/Lys240A ("A" indicates an insertion according to Ambler's scheme for residue numbering in PER beta-lactamases), with structurally important roles in the stabilization of the active site and proper orientation of catalytic water molecules, among others. We propose, supported by simulated models of PER-2 in combination with different beta-lactams, the presence of a hydrogen-bond network connecting Ser70-Gln69-water-Thr237-Arg220 that might be important for the proper activity and inhibition of the enzyme. Therefore, we expect that mutations occurring in these positions will have impacts on the overall hydrolytic behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailCrystal structure of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) from Escherichia coli
Sauvage, Eric; Derouaux, Adeline ULg; Fraipont, Claudine ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2014)

In Escherichia coli, penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3), also known as FtsI, is a central component of the divisome, catalyzing cross-linking of the cell wall peptidoglycan during cell division. PBP3 is ... [more ▼]

In Escherichia coli, penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3), also known as FtsI, is a central component of the divisome, catalyzing cross-linking of the cell wall peptidoglycan during cell division. PBP3 is mainly periplasmic, with a 23 residues cytoplasmic tail and a single transmembrane helix. We have solved the crystal structure of a soluble form of PBP3 (PBP357-577) at 2.5 Å revealing the two modules of high molecular weight class B PBPs, a carboxy terminal module exhibiting transpeptidase activity and an amino terminal module with unknown function. To gain additional insight, the PBP3 Val88-Ser165 subdomain (PBP388-165), for which the electron density is poorly defined in the PBP3 crystal, was produced and its structure solved by SAD phasing at 2.1 Å. The structure shows a three dimensional domain swapping with a β-strand of one molecule inserted between two strands of the paired molecule, suggesting a possible role in PBP357-577 dimerization. [less ▲]

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See detailThe crystal structure of the cell division amidase AmiC reveals the fold of the AMIN domain, a new peptidoglycan binding domain.
Rocaboy, Mathieu; Herman, Raphael; Sauvage, Eric ULg et al

in Molecular microbiology (2013)

Binary fission is the ultimate step of the prokaryotic cell cycle. In Gram-negative bacteria like Escherichia coli, this step implies the invagination of three biological layers (cytoplasmic membrane ... [more ▼]

Binary fission is the ultimate step of the prokaryotic cell cycle. In Gram-negative bacteria like Escherichia coli, this step implies the invagination of three biological layers (cytoplasmic membrane, peptidoglycan and outer membrane), biosynthesis of the new poles and eventually, daughter cells separation. The latter requires the coordinated action of the N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidases AmiA/B/C and their LytM activators EnvC and NlpD to cleave the septal peptidoglycan. We present here the 2.5 A crystal structure of AmiC which includes the first report of an AMIN domain structure, a beta-sandwich of two symmetrical four-stranded beta-sheets exposing highly conserved motifs on the two outer faces. We show that this N-terminal domain, involved in the localization of AmiC at the division site, is a new peptidoglycan-binding domain. The C-terminal catalytic domain shows an auto-inhibitory alpha helix obstructing the active site. AmiC lacking this helix exhibits by itself an activity comparable to that of the wild type AmiC activated by NlpD. We also demonstrate the interaction between AmiC and NlpD by microscale thermophoresis and confirm the importance of the active site blocking alpha helix in the regulation of the amidase activity. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibition of dd-Peptidases by a Specific Trifluoroketone: Crystal Structure of a Complex with the Actinomadura R39 dd-Peptidase.
Dzhekieva, Liudmila; Adediran, S. A.; Herman, Raphael et al

in Biochemistry (2013)

Inhibitors of bacterial dd-peptidases represent potential antibiotics. In the search for alternatives to beta-lactams, we have investigated a series of compounds designed to generate transition state ... [more ▼]

Inhibitors of bacterial dd-peptidases represent potential antibiotics. In the search for alternatives to beta-lactams, we have investigated a series of compounds designed to generate transition state analogue structures upon reaction with dd-peptidases. The compounds contain a combination of a peptidoglycan-mimetic specificity handle and a warhead capable of delivering a tetrahedral anion to the enzyme active site. The latter includes a boronic acid, two alcohols, an aldehyde, and a trifluoroketone. The compounds were tested against two low-molecular mass class C dd-peptidases. As expected from previous observations, the boronic acid was a potent inhibitor, but rather unexpectedly from precedent, the trifluoroketone [d-alpha-aminopimelyl(1,1,1-trifluoro-3-amino)butan-2-one] was also very effective. Taking into account competing hydration, we found the trifluoroketone was the strongest inhibitor of the Actinomadura R39 dd-peptidase, with a subnanomolar (free ketone) inhibition constant. A crystal structure of the complex between the trifluoroketone and the R39 enzyme showed that a tetrahedral adduct had indeed formed with the active site serine nucleophile. The trifluoroketone moiety, therefore, should be considered along with boronic acids and phosphonates as a warhead that can be incorporated into new and effective dd-peptidase inhibitors and therefore, perhaps, antibiotics. [less ▲]

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See detailStructural Determinants of Specificity and Catalytic Mechanism in mammalian 25-kDa Thiamine Triphosphatase
Delvaux, David; Kerff, Frédéric ULg; Murty, Mamidanna R.V.S. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects (2013), 1830

Background: Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is present in most organisms and might be involved in intracellular signaling. In mammalian cells, the cytosolic ThTP level is controlled by a specific thiamine ... [more ▼]

Background: Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is present in most organisms and might be involved in intracellular signaling. In mammalian cells, the cytosolic ThTP level is controlled by a specific thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase), belonging to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. CYTH proteins are present in all superkingdoms of life and act on various triphosphorylated substrates. Methods: Using crystallography, mass spectrometry and mutational analysis, we identified the key structural determinants of the high specificity and catalytic efficiency of mammalian ThTPase. Results: Triphosphate binding requires three conserved arginines while the catalytic mechanism relies on an unusual lysine-tyrosine dyad. By docking of the ThTP molecule in the active site, we found that Trp-53 should interact with the thiazole part of the substrate molecule, thus playing a key role in substrate recognition and specificity. Sea anemone and zebrafish CYTH proteins, which retain the corresponding Trp residue, are also specific ThTPases. Surprisingly, the whole chromosome region containing the ThTPase gene is lost in birds. Conclusion: The specificity for ThTP is linked to a stacking interaction between the thiazole heterocycle of thiamine and a tryptophan residue. The latter likely plays a key role in the secondary acquisition of ThTPase activity in early metazoan CYTH enzymes, in the lineage leading from cnidarians to mammals. General significance: We show that ThTPase activity is not restricted to mammals as previously thought but is an acquisition of early metazoans. This, and the identification of critically important residues, allows us to draw an evolutionary perspective of the CYTH family of proteins. [less ▲]

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See detailSynthesis and evaluation of boronic acids as inhibitors of Penicillin Binding Proteins of classes A, B and C
Zervosen, Astrid ULg; Sauvage, Eric ULg; Bouillez, André ULg et al

Poster (2012, April 18)

The widespread use of beta-lactam antibiotics has lead to the worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains. Bacteria have developed resistance to beta-lactams by three main mechanisms: the production of ... [more ▼]

The widespread use of beta-lactam antibiotics has lead to the worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains. Bacteria have developed resistance to beta-lactams by three main mechanisms: the production of beta-lactamases that catalyze hydrolysis of beta-lactams, the production of low-affinity, drug resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs) and the over expression of resistant PBPs. PBPs are interesting targets because they catalyse the last steps of the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, which is unique in bacteria and has no mammalian analogs, outside the cytoplasmic membrane. Various non-ß-lactam inhibitors of PBPs have been developed with the objective of attempting to stall the development of ß-lactam resistance. Boronic acids are potent beta-lactamase inhibitors and have been shown to display some specificity for soluble transpeptidases and PBPs, but their potential as inhibitors of the latter enzymes is yet to be widely explored. Recently, a (2, 6-dimethoxybenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as being a potent inhibitor of Actinomadura sp. R39 transpeptidase (IC50: 1.3 µM). Here, we will discuss the synthesis of a number of acylaminomethylboronic acids, analogs of (2, 6-dimethoxybenzamido)methylboronic acid, and their potential as inhibitors of PBPs. Several boronic acids of this library were able to inhibit PBPs of classes A, B and C from penicillin sensitive strains. Thus (2-nitrobenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as a good inhibitor of class A PBP (PBP1b from S. pneumoniae, IC50 = 26 µM), class B PBP (PBP2xR6 from S. pneumoniae, IC50 = 138 µM) and class C PBP (R39 from Actinomadura sp., IC50 = 0.6 µM). Crystal structures of complexes of R39 and PBP1b with boronic acid analogs of our library have already been solved and allowed an interpretation of results. We believe that this work opens new avenues towards the development of molecules that will inhibit PBPs, and eventually display bactericidal effect, on distinct bacterial species. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel fragments of clavulanate observed in the structure of the class A b-lactamase from Bacillus licheniformis BS3
Power, Pablo; Mercuri, Paola ULg; Herman, Raphaël ULg et al

in Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (2012), 67(10), 2379-2387

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See detailDevelopment of new drugs for an old target — the penicillin binding proteins.
Zervosen, Astrid ULg; Sauvage, Eric ULg; Frère, Jean-Marie ULg et al

in Molecules (2012), 17(11), 12478-505

The widespread use of β-lactam antibiotics has led to the worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains. Bacteria have developed resistance to β-lactams by two main mechanisms: the production of β ... [more ▼]

The widespread use of β-lactam antibiotics has led to the worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains. Bacteria have developed resistance to β-lactams by two main mechanisms: the production of β-lactamases, sometimes accompanied by a decrease of outer membrane permeability, and the production of low-affinity, drug resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs). PBPs remain attractive targets for developing new antibiotic agents because they catalyse the last steps of the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, which is unique to bacteria, and lies outside the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we summarize the “current state of the art” of non-β-lactam inhibitors of PBPs, which have being developed in an attempt to counter the emergence of β-lactam resistance. These molecules are not susceptible to hydrolysis by β-lactamases and thus present a real alternative to β-lactams. We present transition state analogs such as boronic acids, which can covalently bind to the active serine residue in the catalytic site. Molecules containing ring structures different from the β-lactam-ring like lactivicin are able to acylate the active serine residue. High throughput screening methods, in combination with virtual screening methods and structure based design, have allowed the development of new molecules. Some of these novel inhibitors are active against major pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and thus open avenues new for the discovery of novel antibiotics. [less ▲]

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See detailSynthesis and evaluation of boronic acids as inhibitors of Penicillin Binding Proteins of classes A, B and C.
Zervosen, Astrid ULg; Bouillez, André ULg; Herman, Alexandre et al

in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry (2012), 20(12), 3915-24

In response to the widespread use of beta-lactam antibiotics bacteria have evolved drug resistance mechanisms that include the production of resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs). Boronic acids are ... [more ▼]

In response to the widespread use of beta-lactam antibiotics bacteria have evolved drug resistance mechanisms that include the production of resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs). Boronic acids are potent beta-lactamase inhibitors and have been shown to display some specificity for soluble transpeptidases and PBPs, but their potential as inhibitors of the latter enzymes is yet to be widely explored. Recently, a (2,6-dimethoxybenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as being a potent inhibitor of Actinomadura sp. R39 transpeptidase (IC(50): 1.3muM). In this work, we synthesized and studied the potential of a number of acylaminomethylboronic acids as inhibitors of PBPs from different classes. Several derivatives inhibited PBPs of classes A, B and C from penicillin sensitive strains. The (2-nitrobenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as a good inhibitor of a class A PBP (PBP1b from Streptococcus pneumoniae, IC(50)=26muM), a class B PBP (PBP2xR6 from Streptococcus pneumoniae, IC(50)=138muM) and a class C PBP (R39 from Actinomadura sp., IC(50)=0.6muM). This work opens new avenues towards the development of molecules that inhibit PBPs, and eventually display bactericidal effects, on distinct bacterial species. [less ▲]

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See detailUnexpected tricovalent binding mode of boronic acids within the active site of a penicillin binding protein.
Zervosen, Astrid ULg; Herman, Raphaël ULg; Kerff, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of the American Chemical Society (2011)

Boronic acids bearing appropriate side chains are good inhibitors of serine amidohydrolases. The boron usually adopts a tetrahedral conformation, bound to the nucleophilic serine of the active site and ... [more ▼]

Boronic acids bearing appropriate side chains are good inhibitors of serine amidohydrolases. The boron usually adopts a tetrahedral conformation, bound to the nucleophilic serine of the active site and mimicking the transition state of the enzymatic reaction. We have solved the structures of complexes of a penicillin-binding protein, the DD-peptidase from Actinomadura sp. R39, with four amidomethylboronic acids (2,6 dimethoxybenzamidomethylboronic acid, phenylacetamidomethylboronic acid, 2-chlorobenzamidomethylboronic acid, and 2-nitrobenzamidomethylboronic acid) and the pinacol ester derived from phenylacetamidomethylboronic acid. We found that, in each case, the boron forms a tricovalent adduct with Ogamma of Ser49, Ser298, and the terminal amine group of Lys410, three key residues involved in the catalytic mechanism of penicillin-binding proteins. This represents the first tricovalent enzyme-inhibitor adducts observed by crystallography. In two of the five R39-boronate structures, the boronic acid is found as a tricovalent adduct in two monomers of the asymmetric unit and as a monocovalent adduct with the active serine in the two remaining monomers of the asymmetric unit. Formation of the tricovalent complex from a classical monocovalent complex may involve rotation around the Ser49 Calpha-Cbeta bond to place the boron in a position to interact with Ser298 and Lys410, and a twisting of the side chain amide such that its carbonyl oxygen is able to hydrogen bond to the oxyanion hole NH of Thr413. Biphasic kinetics were observed in three of the five cases and details of the reaction between R39 and 2,6-dimethoxybenzamidomethylboronic acid were studied. Observation of biphasic kinetics was not, however, thought to be correlated to formation of tricovalent complexes, assuming that the latter do form in solution. Based on the crystallographic and kinetic results, a reaction scheme for this unexpected inhibition by boronic acids is proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailStructure Guided Development of Potent Reversibly Binding Penicillin Binding Protein Inhibitors
Woon, Esther C. Y.; Zervosen, Astrid ULg; Sauvage, Eric ULg et al

in ACS Medicinal Chemistry letters (2011), 2 (3)

Following from the evaluation of different types of electrophiles, combined modeling and crystallographic analyses are used to generate potent boronic acid based inhibitors of a penicillin binding protein ... [more ▼]

Following from the evaluation of different types of electrophiles, combined modeling and crystallographic analyses are used to generate potent boronic acid based inhibitors of a penicillin binding protein. The results suggest that a structurally informed approach to penicillin binding protein inhibition will be useful for the development of both improved reversibly binding inhibitors, including boronic acids, and acylating inhibitors, such as β-lactams. [less ▲]

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See detailStructures of class D β-lactamases
Kerff, Frédéric ULg; Sauvage, Eric ULg; Vercheval, Lionel ULg et al

in Frère, Jean-Marie (Ed.) Beta-lactamases (2011)

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See detailThree factors that modulate the activity of class D β-lactamases and interfere with the post-translational carboxylation of Lys 70
Vercheval, Lionel ULg; Di Paolo, Alexandre ULg; Borel, Franck et al

in Biochemical Journal (2010), 432(3), 495-504

Lys-70 carboxylation in the active site of class D β lactamases is essential for their activity. Structural, kinetic and affinity studies show that this post-translational modification can be affected by ... [more ▼]

Lys-70 carboxylation in the active site of class D β lactamases is essential for their activity. Structural, kinetic and affinity studies show that this post-translational modification can be affected by the presence of a poor substrate such as moxalactam but also by the V117T substitution. Val-117 is a strictly conserved hydrophobic residue located in the active site. In addition, inhibition of class D β lactamases by chloride ions is due to a competition between the side chain carboxylate of the modified Lys 70 and chloride ions. Determination of the individual kinetic constants shows that the deacylation of the acyl-enzyme is the rate limiting step for the wild type OXA 10 β lactamase. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecific Structural Features of the N-Acetylmuramoyl-l-Alanine Amidase AmiD from Escherichia coli and Mechanistic Implications for Enzymes of This Family.
Kerff, Frédéric ULg; Petrella, Stéphanie; Mercier, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Molecular Biology (2010), 397

AmiD is the fifth identified N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine zinc amidase of Escherichia coli. This periplasmic lipoprotein is anchored in the outer membrane and has a broad specificity. AmiD is capable of ... [more ▼]

AmiD is the fifth identified N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine zinc amidase of Escherichia coli. This periplasmic lipoprotein is anchored in the outer membrane and has a broad specificity. AmiD is capable of cleaving the intact peptidoglycan (PG) as well as soluble fragments containing N-acetylmuramic acid regardless of the presence of an anhydro form or not, unlike the four other amidases, AmiA, AmiB, AmiC, and AmpD, which have some specificity. AmiD function is, however, not clearly established but it could be part of the enzymatic machinery involved in the PG turnover in E. coli. We solved three structures of the E. coli zinc amidase AmiD devoid of its lipidic anchorage: the holoenzyme, the apoenzyme in complex with the substrate anhydro-N-acetylmuramic-acid-l-Ala-gamma-d-Glu-l-Lys, and the holoenzyme in complex with the l-Ala-gamma-d-Glu-l-Lys peptide, the product of the hydrolysis of this substrate by AmiD. The AmiD structure shows a relatively flexible N-terminal extension that allows an easy reach of the PG by the enzyme inserted into the outer membrane. The C-terminal domain provides a potential extended geometrical complementarity to the substrate. AmiD shares a common fold with AmpD, the bacteriophage T7 lysozyme, and the PG recognition proteins, which are receptor proteins involved in the innate immune responses of a wide range of organisms. Analysis of the different structures reveals the similarity between the catalytic mechanism of zinc amidases of the AmiD family and the thermolysin-related zinc peptidases. [less ▲]

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See detailCrystal structure of a complex between the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase and a peptidoglycan-mimetic boronate inhibitor: interpretation of a transition state analogue in terms of catalytic mechanism.
Dzhekieva, Liudmila; Rocaboy, Mathieu ULg; Kerff, Frédéric ULg et al

in Biochemistry (2010), 49(30), 6411-9

The Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase is a bacterial low molecular weight class C penicillin-binding protein. It has previously been shown to catalyze hydrolysis and aminolysis of small D-alanyl-D-alanine ... [more ▼]

The Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase is a bacterial low molecular weight class C penicillin-binding protein. It has previously been shown to catalyze hydrolysis and aminolysis of small D-alanyl-D-alanine terminating peptides, especially those with a side chain that mimics the amino terminus of the stem peptide precursor to the bacterial cell wall. This paper describes the synthesis of (D-alpha-aminopimelylamino)-D-1-ethylboronic acid, designed to be a peptidoglycan-mimetic transition state analogue inhibitor of the R39 DD-peptidase. The boronate was found to be a potent inhibitor of the peptidase with a K(i) value of 32 +/- 6 nM. Since it binds some 30 times more strongly than the analogous peptide substrate, the boronate may well be a transition state analogue. A crystal structure of the inhibitory complex shows the boronate covalently bound to the nucleophilic active site Ser 49. The aminopimelyl side chain is bound into the site previously identified as specific for this moiety. One boronate oxygen is held in the oxyanion hole; the other, occupying the leaving group site of acylation or the nucleophile site of deacylation, appears to be hydrogen-bonded to the hydroxyl group of Ser 298. The Ser 49 oxygen appears to be hydrogen bonded to Lys 52. If it is assumed that this structure does resemble a high-energy tetrahedral intermediate in catalysis, it seems likely that Ser 298 participates as part of a proton transfer chain initiated by Lys 52 or Lys 410 as the primary proton donor/acceptor. The structure, therefore, supports a particular class of mechanism that employs this proton transfer device. [less ▲]

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See detailStructural basis for the interaction of lactivicins with serine beta-lactamases.
Brown, Tom Jr; Charlier, Paulette ULg; Herman, Raphaël ULg et al

in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2010), 53(15), 5890-4

Lactivicin (LTV) is a natural non-beta-lactam antibiotic that inhibits penicillin-binding proteins and serine beta-lactamases. A crystal structure of a BS3-LTV complex reveals that, as for its reaction ... [more ▼]

Lactivicin (LTV) is a natural non-beta-lactam antibiotic that inhibits penicillin-binding proteins and serine beta-lactamases. A crystal structure of a BS3-LTV complex reveals that, as for its reaction with PBPs, LTV reacts with the nucleophilic serine and that cycloserine and lactone rings of LTV are opened. This structure, together with reported structures of PBP1b with lactivicins, provides a basis for developing improved lactivicin-based gamma-lactam antibiotics. [less ▲]

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See detailStructural basis of the inhibition of class A beta-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins by 6-beta-iodopenicillanate
Sauvage, Eric ULg; Zervosen, Astrid ULg; Dive, Georges ULg et al

in Journal of the American Chemical Society (2009), 131(42), 15262-15269

6-Beta-halogenopenicillanates are powerful, irreversible inhibitors of various beta-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins. Upon acylation of these enzymes, the inhibitors are thought to undergo a ... [more ▼]

6-Beta-halogenopenicillanates are powerful, irreversible inhibitors of various beta-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins. Upon acylation of these enzymes, the inhibitors are thought to undergo a structural rearrangement associated with the departure of the iodide and formation of a dihydrothiazine ring, but, to date, no structural evidence has proven this. 6-Beta-iodopenicillanic acid (BIP) is shown here to be an active antibiotic against various bacterial strains and an effective inhibitor of the class A beta-lactamase of Bacillus subtilis BS3 (BS3) and the D,D-peptidase of Actinomadura R39 (R39). Crystals of BS3 and of R39 were soaked with a solution of BIP and their structures solved at 1.65 and 2.2 A, respectively. The beta-lactam and the thiazolidine rings of BIP are indeed found to be fused into a dihydrothiazine ring that can adopt two stable conformations at these active sites. The rearranged BIP is observed in one conformation in the BS3 active site and in two monomers of the asymmetric unit of R39, and is observed in the other conformation in the other two monomers of the asymmetric unit of R39. The BS3 structure reveals a new mode of carboxylate interaction with a class A beta-lactamase active site that should be of interest in future inhibitor design. [less ▲]

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