References of "Cardol, Pierre"
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See detailF1FO ATP synthase mutants in Chlamydomonas: Stability and oligomycin resistance mediated by atypical Asa7 protein; interaction between chloroplastic and mitochondrial bioenergetics
Lapaille, Marie ULg; Escobar-Ramírez, Adelma; Degand, Hervé et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Bioenergetics (2010), 1797(Supplement 1), 29

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See detailAn atypical member of the light-harvesting complex stress-related protein family modulates diatom responses to light.
Bailleul, Benjamin; Rogato, Alessandra; de Martino, Alessandra et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2010), 107(42), 18214-9

Diatoms are prominent phytoplanktonic organisms that contribute around 40% of carbon assimilation in the oceans. They grow and perform optimally in variable environments, being able to cope with ... [more ▼]

Diatoms are prominent phytoplanktonic organisms that contribute around 40% of carbon assimilation in the oceans. They grow and perform optimally in variable environments, being able to cope with unpredictable changes in the amount and quality of light. The molecular mechanisms regulating diatom light responses are, however, still obscure. Using knockdown Phaeodactylum tricornutum transgenic lines, we reveal the key function of a member of the light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) protein family, denoted LHCX1, in modulation of excess light energy dissipation. In contrast to green algae, this gene is already maximally expressed in nonstressful light conditions and encodes a protein required for efficient light responses and growth. LHCX1 also influences natural variability in photoresponse, as evidenced in ecotypes isolated from different latitudes that display different LHCX1 protein levels. We conclude, therefore, that this gene plays a pivotal role in managing light responses in diatoms. [less ▲]

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See detailElectrochromism: a useful probe to study algal photosynthesis.
Bailleul, Benjamin; Cardol, Pierre ULg; Breyton, Cecile et al

in Photosynthesis Research (2010), 106(1-2), 179-89

In photosynthesis, electron transfer along the photosynthetic chain results in a vectorial transfer of protons from the stroma to the lumenal space of the thylakoids. This promotes the generation of an ... [more ▼]

In photosynthesis, electron transfer along the photosynthetic chain results in a vectorial transfer of protons from the stroma to the lumenal space of the thylakoids. This promotes the generation of an electrochemical proton gradient (Deltamu(H)(+)), which comprises a gradient of electric potential (DeltaPsi) and of proton concentration (DeltapH). The Deltamu(H)(+) has a central role in the photosynthetic process, providing the energy source for ATP synthesis. It is also involved in many regulatory mechanisms. The DeltapH modulates the rate of electron transfer and triggers deexcitation of excess energy within the light harvesting complexes. The DeltaPsi is required for metabolite and protein transport across the membranes. Its presence also induces a shift in the absorption spectra of some photosynthetic pigments, resulting in the so-called ElectroChromic Shift (ECS). In this review, we discuss the characteristic features of the ECS, and illustrate possible applications for the study of photosynthetic processes in vivo. [less ▲]

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See detailEukaryotic algae: where lies the diversity of oxygenic photosynthesis.
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Franck, Fabrice ULg

in Photosynthesis Research (2010), 106(1-2), 1-2

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See detailCharacterization of complex I mutants in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii : Role of structural subunits and identification of assembly factors.
Larosa, Véronique ULg; Barbieri, Rosario; Bonnefoy, Nathalie et al

Scientific conference (2009)

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See detailOxidative phosphorylation: Building blocks and related components
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Figueroa, Francisco; Remacle, Claire ULg et al

in Stern, David; Harris, Elizabeth; Witman, George (Eds.) The Chlamydomonas Sourcebook 3-vol set, 1-3 (2009)

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See detailThe mitochondrial genome
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Remacle, Claire ULg

in Stern, David; Harris, Elizabeth; Witman, George (Eds.) The Chlamydomonas Sourcebook 3-vol set, 1-3 (2009)

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See detailImpaired respiration discloses the physiological significance of state transitions in Chlamydomonas.
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Alric, Jean; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2009), 106(37), 15979-84

State transitions correspond to a major regulation process for photosynthesis, whereby chlorophyll protein complexes responsible for light harvesting migrate between photosystem II and photosystem I in ... [more ▼]

State transitions correspond to a major regulation process for photosynthesis, whereby chlorophyll protein complexes responsible for light harvesting migrate between photosystem II and photosystem I in response to changes in the redox poise of the intersystem electron carriers. Here we disclose their physiological significance in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using a genetic approach. Using single and double mutants defective for state transitions and/or mitochondrial respiration, we show that photosynthetic growth, and therefore biomass production, critically depends on state transitions in respiratory-defective conditions. When extra ATP cannot be provided by respiration, enhanced photosystem I turnover elicited by transition to state 2 is required for photosynthetic activity. Concomitant impairment of state transitions and respiration decreases the overall yield of photosynthesis, ultimately leading to reduced fitness. We thus provide experimental evidence that the combined energetic contributions of state transitions and respiration are required for efficient carbon assimilation in this alga. [less ▲]

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See detailThe fully-active and structurally-stable form of the mitochondrial ATP synthase of Polytomella sp is dimeric
Villavicencio-Queijeiro, Alexa; Vazquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Cano-Estrada, Araceli et al

in Journal of Bioenergetics & Biomembranes (2009), 41(1), 1-13

Mitochondrial F1FO-ATP synthase of chlorophycean algae is a stable dimeric complex of 1,600 kDa. It lacks the classic subunits that constitute the peripheral stator-stalk and the orthodox polypeptides ... [more ▼]

Mitochondrial F1FO-ATP synthase of chlorophycean algae is a stable dimeric complex of 1,600 kDa. It lacks the classic subunits that constitute the peripheral stator-stalk and the orthodox polypeptides involved in the dimerization of the complex. Instead, it contains nine polypeptides of unknown evolutionary origin named ASA1 to ASA9. The isolated enzyme exhibited a very low ATPase activity (0.03 Units/mg), that increased upon heat treatment, due to the release of the F-1 sector. Oligomycin was found to stabilize the dimeric structure of the enzyme, providing partial resistance to heat dissociation. Incubation in the presence of low concentrations of several non-ionic detergents increased the oligomycin-sensitive ATPase activity up to 7.0-9.0 Units/mg. Incubation with 3% (w/v) taurodeoxycholate monomerized the enzyme. The monomeric form of the enzyme exhibited diminished activity in the presence of detergents and diminished oligomycin sensitivity. Cross-linking experiments carried out with the dimeric and monomeric forms of the ATP synthase suggested the participation of the ASA6 subunit in the dimerization of the enzyme. The dimeric enzyme was more resistant to heat treatment, high hydrostatic pressures, and protease digestion than the monomeric enzyme, which was readily disrupted by these treatments. We conclude that the fully-active algal mitochondrial ATP synthase is a stable catalytically active dimer; the monomeric form is less active and less stable. Monomer-monomer interactions could be mediated by the membrane-bound subunits ASA6 and ASA9, and may be further stabilized by other polypeptides such as ASA1 and ASA5. [less ▲]

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See detailS13.45 Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mitoproteome adaptation in response to inactivation of the energy-dissipating alternative oxidase 1 by RNA interference
Cloes, Marie ULg; Mathy, Grégory ULg; Cardol, Pierre ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Bioenergetics, Volume 1777, Supplement 1, 19 July 2008, Page S99 (2008, July 18), 1777(Supplement 1), 99

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See detailImportance of the alternative pathway of respiration for avoidance of ROS production and for optimisation of photosynthesis in Chlamydomonas
Franck, Fabrice ULg; Dinant, M.; Cardol, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2008, June)

The physiological function of the alternative pathway of respiration has been investigated by analysing two RNAi C.reinhardtii lines deprived of alternative oxidase protein (AOX1). Compared to wild-type ... [more ▼]

The physiological function of the alternative pathway of respiration has been investigated by analysing two RNAi C.reinhardtii lines deprived of alternative oxidase protein (AOX1). Compared to wild-type, AOX1- lines exhibited modified growth curves and reduced maximal cell density. These differences were more pronounced at high irradiance and in nitrate-containing medium (TAP NO3) rather than in ammonium-containing medium (TAP NH4). Although the alternative pathway was inactive, respiration was not significantly altered in transgenics. Light-saturation curves of O2-evolution were only slightly modified. However, non-photochemical quenching of fluorescence (NPQ) was strongly reduced. Further analysis showed that AOX1- transgenics present a reduced ability to promote the change in energy distribution between photosystems, known as state transition. This effect, which explains low NPQ in the light, was most pronounced in high-light cells cultivated in TAP NO3 medium. Moreover, AOX1- transgenics exhibited higher levels of intracellular peroxides, which suggests that inhibition of state transition might result from higher ROS production. In support of this hypothesis, addition of millimolar-range concentrations of H2O2 to wild-type inhibited the state transition promoted by the reduction of the plastoquinone pool in darkness. [less ▲]

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See detailIn Chlamydomonas, the Loss of Nd5 Subunit Prevents the Assembly of Whole Mitochondrial Complex I and Leads to the Formation of a Low Abundant 700 Kda Subcomplex
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Boutaffala, Layla ULg; Memmi, S. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Bioenergetics (2008), 1777

In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a mutant deprived of complex I enzyme activity presents a 1T deletion in the mitochondrial nd5 gene. The loss of the ND5 subunit prevents the assembly of the ... [more ▼]

In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a mutant deprived of complex I enzyme activity presents a 1T deletion in the mitochondrial nd5 gene. The loss of the ND5 subunit prevents the assembly of the 950 kDa whole complex I. Instead, a low abundant 700 kDa subcomplex, loosely associated to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is assembled. The resolution of the subcomplex by SDS-PAGE gave rise to 19 individual spots, sixteen having been identified by mass spectrometry analysis. Eleven, mainly associated to the hydrophilic part of the complex, are homologs to subunits of the bovine enzyme whereas five (including gamma-type carbonic anhydrase subunits) are specific to green plants or to plants and fungi. None of the subunits typical of the beta membrane domain of complex I enzyme has been identified in the mutant. This allows us to propose that the truncated enzyme misses the membrane distal domain of complex I but retains the proximal domain associated to the matrix arm of the enzyme. A complex I topology model is presented in the light of our results. Finally, a supercomplex most probably corresponding to complex I-complex III association, was identified in mutant mitochondria, indicating that the missing part of the enzyme is not required for the formation of the supercomplex. [less ▲]

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See detailA type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase mediates light-independent plastoquinone reduction in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas
Jans, Frédéric ULg; Mignolet, Emmanuel ULg; Houyoux, Pierre-Alain et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2008), 105(51), 20546-51

In photosynthetic eukaryotes, nonphotochemical plastoquinone (PQ) reduction is important for the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow. In green microalgae where this process has been demonstrated ... [more ▼]

In photosynthetic eukaryotes, nonphotochemical plastoquinone (PQ) reduction is important for the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow. In green microalgae where this process has been demonstrated, the chloroplastic enzyme that catalyses nonphotochemical PQ reduction has not been identified yet. Here, we show by an RNA interference (RNAi) approach that the NDA2 gene, belonging to a type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases family in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, encodes a chloroplastic dehydrogenase that functions to reduce PQ nonphotochemically in this alga. Using a specific antibody, we show that the Nda2 protein is localized in chloroplasts of wild-type cells and is absent in two Nda2-RNAi cell lines. In both mutant cell lines, nonphotochemical PQ reduction is severely affected, as indicated by altered chlorophyll fluorescence transients after saturating illumination. Compared with wild type, change in light excitation distribution between photosystems ('state transition') upon inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport is strongly impaired in transformed cells because of inefficient PQ reduction. Furthermore, the amount of hydrogen produced by Nda2-RNAi cells under sulfur deprivation is substantially decreased compared with wild type, which supports previous assumptions that endogenous substrates serve as source of electrons for hydrogen formation. These results demonstrate the importance of Nda2 for nonphotochemical PQ reduction and associated processes in C. reinhardtii. [less ▲]

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See detailAlternative photosynthetic electron flow to oxygen in marine Synechococcus.
Bailey, Shaun; Melis, Anastasios; Mackey, Katherine R M et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (2008), 1777(3), 269-76

Cyanobacteria dominate the world's oceans where iron is often barely detectable. One manifestation of low iron adaptation in the oligotrophic marine environment is a decrease in levels of iron-rich ... [more ▼]

Cyanobacteria dominate the world's oceans where iron is often barely detectable. One manifestation of low iron adaptation in the oligotrophic marine environment is a decrease in levels of iron-rich photosynthetic components, including the reaction center of photosystem I and the cytochrome b6f complex [R.F. Strzepek and P.J. Harrison, Photosynthetic architecture differs in coastal and oceanic diatoms, Nature 431 (2004) 689-692.]. These thylakoid membrane components have well characterised roles in linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport and their low abundance creates potential impediments to photosynthetic function. Here we show that the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus WH8102 exhibits significant alternative electron flow to O2, a potential adaptation to the low iron environment in oligotrophic oceans. This alternative electron flow appears to extract electrons from the intersystem electron transport chain, prior to photosystem I. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that a propyl gallate-sensitive oxidase mediates this flow of electrons to oxygen, which in turn alleviates excessive photosystem II excitation pressure that can often occur even at relatively low irradiance. These findings are also discussed in the context of satisfying the energetic requirements of the cell when photosystem I abundance is low. [less ▲]

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See detailAn original adaptation of photosynthesis in the marine green alga Ostreococcus.
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Bailleul, Benjamin; Rappaport, Fabrice et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2008), 105(22), 7881-6

Adaptation of photosynthesis in marine environment has been examined in two strains of the green, picoeukaryote Ostreococcus: OTH95, a surface/high-light strain, and RCC809, a deep-sea/low-light strain ... [more ▼]

Adaptation of photosynthesis in marine environment has been examined in two strains of the green, picoeukaryote Ostreococcus: OTH95, a surface/high-light strain, and RCC809, a deep-sea/low-light strain. Differences between the two strains include changes in the light-harvesting capacity, which is lower in OTH95, and in the photoprotection capacity, which is enhanced in OTH95. Furthermore, RCC809 has a reduced maximum rate of O(2) evolution, which is limited by its decreased photosystem I (PSI) level, a possible adaptation to Fe limitation in the open oceans. This decrease is, however, accompanied by a substantial rerouting of the electron flow to establish an H(2)O-to-H(2)O cycle, involving PSII and a potential plastid plastoquinol terminal oxidase. This pathway bypasses electron transfer through the cytochrome b(6)f complex and allows the pumping of "extra" protons into the thylakoid lumen. By promoting the generation of a large DeltapH, it facilitates ATP synthesis and nonphotochemical quenching when RCC809 cells are exposed to excess excitation energy. We propose that the diversion of electrons to oxygen downstream of PSII, but before PSI, reflects a common and compulsory strategy in marine phytoplankton to bypass the constraints imposed by light and/or nutrient limitation and allow successful colonization of the open-ocean marine environment. [less ▲]

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See detailEukaryotic complex I: functional diversity and experimental systems to unravel the assembly process
Remacle, Claire ULg; Barbieri, Rosario; Cardol, Pierre ULg et al

in Molecular Genetics & Genomics (2008), 280

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See detailPhotosynthesis in picoeucaryote algae, the Ostreococcus case
Cardol, Pierre ULg

Conference (2007, June 19)

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See detailThe Chlamydomonas genome reveals the evolution of key animal and plant functions.
Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Vallon, Olivier et al

in Science (2007), 318(5848), 245-50

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the ... [more ▼]

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the approximately 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella. [less ▲]

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