References of "Cardol, Pierre"
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See detailLight induced photosynthetic electron transfer upon anaerobiosis in Chlamydomonas: Kinetics, electron sinks and setup of a fluorescence screen to identify new players
Godaux, Damien ULg; Emonds-Alt, Barbara ULg; Alric, Jean et al

Conference (2012, June 15)

In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, prolonged anaerobiosis leads to the expression of various fermentative pathways. Among them, oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases (hyd) catalyze the reduction of protons from ... [more ▼]

In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, prolonged anaerobiosis leads to the expression of various fermentative pathways. Among them, oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases (hyd) catalyze the reduction of protons from reduced ferredoxin resulting in the production of molecular hydrogen. In this work, light-induced photosynthetic electron transfer after a prolonged dark-anaerobiosis period was studied by following the kinetics of chlorophyll fluorescence emission, P700 oxidation and proton-motive force formation and consumption during the first 3 seconds of illumination. We show that during the induction of photosynthesis, an hyd-dependent photosynthetic electron transfer operates at a maximal rate of 110 electrons per photosystem per second, that is about half the one measured in aerobiosis. The implication in this process of components of the linear, cyclic and chlororespiratory electron transfer pathways, as well as various electron sinks, are investigated thanks to the availability of mutants. In a next step, we screen an insertional mutant library (~3000 clones) on the basis of the fluorescence induction kinetics upon a shift from dark-anaerobiosis to light. Five mutants display the signature of mutants deficient for NADPH:PQ oxidoreductase or hyd activities. In particular, one is defective for hydrogenase HydG assembly factor. This mutant behaves exactly has the hydEF mutant, thus confirming that in vivo both the assembly factors are required for an efficient hydrogenase activity. [less ▲]

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See detailMitochondrial Proteomics of a Secondary Green Alga
Perez, Emilie ULg; Degand, Hervé; Morsomme, Pierre et al

Poster (2012, June)

Euglena gracilis is an alga that derives from a secondary endosymbiosis with a green alga. Our general objective is to study the interactions established between the chloroplast and the mitochondrion ... [more ▼]

Euglena gracilis is an alga that derives from a secondary endosymbiosis with a green alga. Our general objective is to study the interactions established between the chloroplast and the mitochondrion during the endosymbiosic event and to determine the phylogenetic origin of the genes encoding the proteins involved in these interactions. As a first step, we performed a high-throughput analysis of the mitochondrial proteome of Euglena gracilis. Our MS/MS experiments mostly recover mitochondrial proteins representing 15 mitochondrial pathways, which indicates that our mitochondrial extracts are relatively pure, but the phylogenetic origins of the corresponding genes are surprisingly diverse. [less ▲]

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See detailComplexes I in the green lineage.
Remacle, Claire ULg; Hamel, Patrice; Larosa, Véronique ULg et al

in Sazanov, Leonid (Ed.) A structural perspective on complex I. (2012)

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See detailFinding the bottleneck: a research strategy for improved biomass production
Bassi, Roberto; Cardol, Pierre ULg; Choquet, Yves et al

in Posten, Clemens; Walter, Christian (Eds.) Microalgal Biotechnology: integration and economy (2012)

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See detailInsertional mutagenesis to select mutants for modified hydrogen photoproduction in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Godaux, Damien ULg; Emonds-alt, Barbara; Cardol, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2011, September 18)

The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has evolved the ability to redirect electrons from the photosynthetic chain to drive hydrogen production via chloroplast oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases ... [more ▼]

The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has evolved the ability to redirect electrons from the photosynthetic chain to drive hydrogen production via chloroplast oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases. This process occurs under anaerobic conditions and provides a biological basis for solar-driven hydrogen production. Nevertheless, the yield is a major limitation for an economic viability and fundamental knowledge is still needed in order to have a better understanding of the process. In 2000, Melis and co-worker defined a protocol allowing a sustainable hydrogen production in sulfur deprivation condition. By adjustment of an existent protocol called the Winkler test, we are trying to isolate mutants with an attenuated photosynthesis to respiration capacity ratio (P/R ratio). This kind of mutants could be able to reach anoxia needed for hydrogenases activity without the stressful impact of sulfur deprivation. An insertional mutagenesis of Chlamydomonas has been carried out with an hygromycin resistance cassette and about 2500 transformants have generated and screened by the adapted Winkler test. We have isolated several oxygen-consuming mutants and the most promising one is subject to functional, molecular and genetic characterization. [less ▲]

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See detailInsertional mutagenesis to select mutants for modified hydrogen photoproduction in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Godaux, Damien ULg; Emonds-Alt, Barbara ULg; Cardol, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2011, May 17)

The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has evolved the ability to redirect electrons from the photosynthetic chain to drive hydrogen production via chloroplast oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases ... [more ▼]

The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has evolved the ability to redirect electrons from the photosynthetic chain to drive hydrogen production via chloroplast oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases. This process occurs under anaerobic conditions and provides a biological basis for solar-driven hydrogen production. Nevertheless, the yield is a major limitation for an economic viability and fundamental knowledge is still needed in order to have a better understanding of the process. In 2000, Melis and co-worker defined a protocol allowing a sustainable hydrogen production in sulfur deprivation condition. By adjustment of an existent protocol called the Winkler test, we are trying to isolate mutants with an attenuated photosynthesis to respiration capacity ratio (P/R ratio). This kind of mutants could be able to reach anoxia needed for hydrogenases activity without the stressful impact of sulfur deprivation. An insertional mutagenesis of Chlamydomonas has been carried out with an hygromycin resistance cassette and about 2500 transformants have generated and screened by the adapted Winkler test. We have isolated several oxygen-consuming mutants and the most promising one is subject to functional, molecular and genetic characterization. To discover new genes involved in hydrogenases activity, we are also planning to screen the same insertional library for mutants with attenuated levels of hydrogen photoproduction, using sensitive chemochromic sensor films which turn in blue in presence of hydrogen. We are currently making the chemochromic sensor WO3 films by dip-coating which is on the brink of being useable. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional analysis of hydrogen photoproduction in respiratory-deficient mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Lecler, Renaud ULg; Godaux, Damien ULg; Vigeolas, Hélène ULg et al

in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (2011), 36

In this paper, mitochondrial mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii defective for respiratory complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), complex III (ubiquinol cytochrome c oxidoreductase) and both ... [more ▼]

In this paper, mitochondrial mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii defective for respiratory complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), complex III (ubiquinol cytochrome c oxidoreductase) and both complexes I and III were analyzed for H2 photoproduction. Several parameters were followed during the S-deficiency stage and the anaerobic stage leading to H2 photoproduction. At the early aerobic S-deficiency stage, starch and neutral lipids accumulated in all strains but their amount was significantly decreased in mutants compared to wild type. During the H2 photoproduction process, whereas starch content strongly decreased in all strains, neutral lipid amount remained nearly unchanged, suggesting that starch degraded by glycolysis is the preferential substrate for energy production during anaerobiosis. The mutants displayed a decrease in H2 photoproduction correlating to the number of active mitochondrial proton-pumping sites lost in the strains. Our results thus highlight the critical role of oxidative phosphorylation during the first (aerobic) stage of S-starvation when carbon resources are accumulated. [less ▲]

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See detailMitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in eukaryotes: A highly conserved subunit composition highlighted by mining of protein databases
Cardol, Pierre ULg

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Bioenergetics (2011), 11

Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the largest enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Compared to its bacterial counterpart which encompasses 14-17 subunits, mitochondrial complex I has ... [more ▼]

Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the largest enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Compared to its bacterial counterpart which encompasses 14-17 subunits, mitochondrial complex I has almost tripled its subunit composition during evolution of eukaryotes, by recruitment of so-called accessory subunits, part of them being specific to distinct evolutionary lineages. The increasing availability of numerous broadly sampled eukaryotic genomes now enables the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of this large protein complex. Here, a combination of profile-based sequence comparisons and basic structural properties analyses at the protein level enabled to pinpoint homology relationships between complex I subunits from fungi, mammals or green plants, previously identified as "lineage-specific" subunits. In addition, homologs of at least 40 mammalian complex I subunits are present in representatives of all major eukaryote assemblages, half of them having not been investigated so far (Excavates, Chromalveolates, Amoebozoa). This analysis revealed that complex I was subject to a phenomenal increase in size that predated the diversification of extant eukaryotes, followed by very few lineage-specific additions/losses of subunits. The implications of this subunit conservation for studies of complex I are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detail3D-reconstruction and overall topology of the dimeric mitochondrial ATP synthase of the colorless alga Polytomella sp
González-Halphen, Diego; Vázquez-Acevedo, Myriam; Cano-Estrada, Araceli et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Bioenergetics (2010, July), 1797(Supplement 1), 32

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See detailAtypical subunit composition of the chlorophycean mitochondrial F1FO ATP synthase and role of Asa7 protein in stability and oligomycin resistance of the enzyme.
Lapaille, Marie; Escobar-Ramirez, Adelma; Degand, Hervé et al

in Molecular Biology and Evolution (2010), 27(7), 1630-1644

Background. In yeast, mammals, and land plants, mitochondrial F(1)F(O) ATP synthase (complex V) is a remarkable enzymatic machinery which comprises about 15 conserved subunits. Peculiar among eukaryotes ... [more ▼]

Background. In yeast, mammals, and land plants, mitochondrial F(1)F(O) ATP synthase (complex V) is a remarkable enzymatic machinery which comprises about 15 conserved subunits. Peculiar among eukaryotes, complex V from Chlamydomonadales algae (order of chlorophycean class) has an atypical subunit composition of its peripheral stator and dimerization module, with 9 subunits of unknown evolutionary origin (Asa subunits). In vitro, this enzyme exhibits an increased stability of its dimeric form, and in vivo, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells are insensitive to oligomycins, which are potent inhibitors of proton translocation through the F(O) moiety. Methodology/Principal Findings. In this work, we showed that the atypical features of the Chlamydomonadales complex V enzyme are shared by the other chlorophycean orders. By biochemical and in silico analyses, we detected several atypical Asa subunits in Scenedesmus obliquus (Sphaeropleales) and Chlorococcum ellipsoideum (Chlorococcales). In contrast, Complex V has a canonical subunit composition in other classes of Chlorophytes (Trebouxiophyceae, Prasinophyceae, and Ulvophyceae) as well as in Streptophytes (land plants) and in Rhodophytes (red algae). Growth, respiration and ATP levels in Chlorophyceae were also barely affected by oligomycin concentrations that affect representatives of the other classes of Chlorophytes. We finally studied the function of the Asa7 atypical subunit by using RNA interference in C. reinhardtii. Although the loss of Asa7 subunit has no impact on cell bioenergetics or mitochondrial structures, it destabilizes in vitro the enzyme dimeric form and renders growth, respiration and ATP level sensitive to oligomycins. Conclusions/Significance. Altogether, our results suggest that the loss of canonical components of the Complex V stator happened at the root of chlorophycean lineage and was accompanied by the recruitment of novel polypeptides. Such a massive modification of Complex V stator features might have conferred novel properties, including the stabilization of the enzyme dimeric form and the shielding of the proton channel. In these respects, we discuss an evolutionary scenario for F(1)F(O) ATP synthase in the whole green lineage (i.e. Chlorophyta and Streptophyta). [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic and functional characterization of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant lacking the mitochondrial alternative oxidase 1
Mathy, Grégory ULg; Cardol, Pierre ULg; Dinant, Monique et al

in Journal of Proteome Research (2010), 9

In the present work we have isolated by RNA interference and characterized at the functional and the proteomic levels a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain devoid of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase ... [more ▼]

In the present work we have isolated by RNA interference and characterized at the functional and the proteomic levels a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain devoid of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX). The AOX-deficient strain displays a doubling of the cell volume and biomass without any alteration of the generation time, a significantly higher ROS production, no change in total respiration rate, and a slight decrease of the photosynthesis efficiency. In order to identify the molecular adaptation underlying these phenotypical effects, we carried out a comparative proteomic study at the level of the mitochondrial and cellular soluble proteomes. Our results indicate a strong up-regulation of the ROS scavenging systems and important modifications of proteins involved in the primary metabolism, namely an increase of enzymes involved in anabolic pathways and a concomitant general down-regulation of enzymes of the main catabolic pathways. [less ▲]

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See detailLoss of mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit beta (Atp2) alters mitochondrial and chloroplastic function and morphology in Chlamydomonas.
Lapaille, M.; Thiry, Marc ULg; Perez, E. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Bioenergetics (2010), 1797

Mitochondrial F(1)F(O) ATP synthase (Complex V) catalyses ATP synthesis from ADP and inorganic phosphate using the proton-motive force generated by the substrate-driven electron transfer chain. In this ... [more ▼]

Mitochondrial F(1)F(O) ATP synthase (Complex V) catalyses ATP synthesis from ADP and inorganic phosphate using the proton-motive force generated by the substrate-driven electron transfer chain. In this work, we investigated the impact of the loss of activity of the mitochondrial enzyme in a photosynthetic organism. In this purpose, we inactivated by RNA interference the expression of the ATP2 gene, coding for the catalytic subunit beta, in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that in the absence of beta subunit, complex V is not assembled, respiratory rate is decreased by half and ATP synthesis coupled to the respiratory activity is fully impaired. Lack of ATP synthase also affects the morphology of mitochondria which are deprived of cristae. We also show that mutants are obligate phototrophs and that rearrangements of the photosynthetic apparatus occur in the chloroplast as a response to ATP synthase deficiency in mitochondria. Altogether, our results contribute to the understanding of the yet poorly studied bioenergetic interactions between organelles in photosynthetic organisms. [less ▲]

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See detailSubunit-subunit interactions and overall topology of the dimeric mitochondrial ATP synthase of Polytomella sp.
Cano-Estrada, A.; Vazquez-Acevedo, M.; Villavicencio-Queijeiro, A. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Bioenergetics (2010), 1797

Mitochondrial F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase of chlorophycean algae is a dimeric complex of 1600kDa constituted by 17 different subunits with varying stoichiometries, 8 of them conserved in all eukaryotes and 9 ... [more ▼]

Mitochondrial F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase of chlorophycean algae is a dimeric complex of 1600kDa constituted by 17 different subunits with varying stoichiometries, 8 of them conserved in all eukaryotes and 9 that seem to be unique to the algal lineage (subunits ASA1-9). Two different models proposing the topological assemblage of the nine ASA subunits in the ATP synthase of the colorless alga Polytomella sp. have been put forward. Here, we readdressed the overall topology of the enzyme with different experimental approaches: detection of close vicinities between subunits based on cross-linking experiments and dissociation of the enzyme into subcomplexes, inference of subunit stoichiometry based on cysteine residue labelling, and general three-dimensional structural features of the complex as obtained from small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy image reconstruction. Based on the available data, we refine the topological arrangement of the subunits that constitute the mitochondrial ATP synthase of Polytomella sp. [less ▲]

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See detailKnock-down of the COX3 and COX17 gene expression of cytochrome c oxidase in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.
Remacle, Claire ULg; Coosemans, Nadine ULg; Jans, Frédéric ULg et al

in Plant Molecular Biology (2010), 74(3), 223-2363

The COX3 gene encodes a core subunit of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) whereas the COX17 gene encodes a chaperone delivering copper to the enzyme. Mutants of these two genes were isolated ... [more ▼]

The COX3 gene encodes a core subunit of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) whereas the COX17 gene encodes a chaperone delivering copper to the enzyme. Mutants of these two genes were isolated by RNA interference in the microalga Chlamydomonas. The COX3 mRNA was completely lacking in the cox3-RNAi mutant and no activity and assembly of complex IV were detected. The cox17-RNAi mutant presented a reduced level of COX17 mRNA, a reduced activity of the cytochrome c oxidase but no modification of its amount. The cox3-RNAi mutant had only 40% of the wild-type rate of dark respiration which was cyanide-insensitive. The mutant presented a 60% decrease of H(2)O(2) production in the dark compared to wild type, which probably accounts for a reduced electron leakage by respiratory complexes III and IV. In contrast, the cox17-RNAi mutant showed no modification of respiration and of H(2)O(2) production in the dark but a two to threefold increase of H(2)O(2) in the light compared to wild type and the cox3-RNAi mutant. The cox17-RNAi mutant was more sensitive to cadmium than the wild-type and cox3-RNAi strains. This suggested that besides its role in complex IV assembly, Cox17 could have additional functions in the cell such as metal detoxification or Reactive Oxygen Species protection or signaling. Concerning Cox3, its role in Chlamydomonas complex IV is similar to that of other eukaryotes although this subunit is encoded in the nuclear genome in the alga contrary to the situation found in all other organisms. [less ▲]

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See detailThe onset of NPQ and Deltamu(H)+ upon illumination of tobacco plants studied through the influence of mitochondrial electron transport.
Cardol, Pierre ULg; De Paepe, Rosine; Franck, Fabrice ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (2010), 1797(2), 177-88

The relationship between the development of photoprotective mechanisms (non-photochemical quenching, NPQ), the generation of the electrochemical proton gradient in the chloroplast and the capacity to ... [more ▼]

The relationship between the development of photoprotective mechanisms (non-photochemical quenching, NPQ), the generation of the electrochemical proton gradient in the chloroplast and the capacity to assimilate CO(2) was studied in tobacco dark-adapted leaves at the onset of illumination with low light. These conditions induce the generation of a transient NPQ, which relaxes in the light in parallel with the activation of the Calvin cycle. Wild-type plants were compared with a CMSII mitochondrial mutant, which lacks the respiratory complex I and shows a delayed activation of photosynthesis. In the mutant, a slower onset of photosynthesis was mirrored by a decreased capacity to develop NPQ. This correlates with a reduced efficiency to reroute electrons at the PSI reducing side towards cyclic electron flow around PSI and/or other alternative acceptor pools, and with a smaller ability to generate a proton motive force in the light. Altogether, these data illustrate the tight relationship existing between the capacity to evacuate excess electrons accumulated in the intersystem carriers and the capacity to dissipate excess photons during a dark to light transition. These data also underline the essential role of respiration in modulating the photoprotective response in dark-adapted leaves, by poising the cellular redox state. [less ▲]

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