References of "Cabaraux, Jean-François"
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See detailAmmonia and greenhouse gas emission from group-housed gestating sows depends on floor type
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment (2011), 140

The ban by 2013 in the EU of individual accommodations for gestating sows and the renewed interest for litter systems could promote in the future the group-housing of gestating sows on litter. But what ... [more ▼]

The ban by 2013 in the EU of individual accommodations for gestating sows and the renewed interest for litter systems could promote in the future the group-housing of gestating sows on litter. But what are the environmental impacts of this rearing technique? To answer this question, a study was scheduled to quantify pollutant gas emissions (nitrous oxide -N2O-, methane -CH4-, carbon dioxide -CO2- and ammonia -NH3-) according to floor type in the raising of group-housed gestating sows. The trial was carried out in experimental rooms located at Liège University (Belgium). Three successive batches of 10 gestating sows were used for this trial. Each batch was divided into 2 homogeneous groups randomly allocated to one of two treatments: concrete slatted floor or straw-based deep litter. The groups were kept separately in two identical rooms equipped with a pen divided into a lying area (slatted floor or deep litter) and five individual feeding stalls. The feeding stalls were equipped with front feeding troughs and rear gates preventing access to the stalls outside of the feeding time. Between each batch of sows, the pens were cleaned. In both rooms, ventilation was automatically adapted to maintain a constant ambient temperature. The gas emissions were measured 3 times (weeks 2, 5 and 8 of stay) during 6 consecutive days by infra red photoacoustic detection. Sow performance (body weight gain, backfat thickness, number and weight of piglets) was not significantly affected by floor type. With sows kept on slatted floor, gaseous emissions were significantly greater for NH3 (12.77 vs. 9.05 g d-1 sow-1; P<0.001) and CH4 (10.12 vs. 9.20 g d-1 sow-1; P<0.01), and significantly lower for N2O (0.47 vs. 2.27 g d-1 sow-1; P<0.001), CO2 equivalents (0.44 vs. 0.94 kg d-1 sow-1; P<0.001) and CO2 (2.41 vs. 2.83 kg d-1 sow-1; P<0.001) compared to sows housed on straw-based deep litter. There was no significant difference for water vapour emissions (3.25 vs. 3.21 kg d-1 sow-1; P>0.05). In conclusion, the main environmental disadvantage of the deep litter system pointed to in this study was the greater N2O-emissions and thus greater CO2eq-emissions compared to slatted floor. However, the use of deep litter was related to reduced NH3- and CH4-emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of available surface on gaseous emissions from group-housed gestating sows kept on deep litter
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Canart, Bernard; Laitat, Martine ULg et al

in Animal (2010), 4(10), 1716-1724

In the European Union, the group-housed pregnant sows have to have a minimal legal available area of 2.25m²/sow. However, it has been observed that an increased space allowance reduces agonistic behaviour ... [more ▼]

In the European Union, the group-housed pregnant sows have to have a minimal legal available area of 2.25m²/sow. However, it has been observed that an increased space allowance reduces agonistic behaviour and consecutive wounds and thus induces better welfare conditions. But, what about the environmental impacts of this greater available area? Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify pollutant gases emissions (nitrous oxide, N2O, methane, CH4, carbon dioxide, CO2 and ammonia, NH3), according to the space allowance in the raising of gestating sows group-housed on a straw-based deep litter. Four successive batches of 10 gestating sows were each divided into two homogeneous groups and randomly allocated to a treatment: 2.5 v. 3.0m²/sow. The groups were separately kept in two identical rooms. A restricted conventional cereals based diet was provided once a day in individual feeding stalls available only during the feeding time. Rooms were automatically ventilated. The gas emissions were measured by infra red photoacoustic detection during six consecutive days at the 6th, 9th and 12th weeks of gestation. Sows performance (body weight gain, backfat thickness, number and weight of piglets) was not significantly different according to the space allowance. In the room with 3.0m²/sow and compared with the room with 2.5m²/sow, gaseous emissions were significantly greater for NH3 (6.29 v. 5.37 g NH3-N/day per sow; P<0.01) and significantly lower for N2O (1.78 v. 2.48 g N2O-N/day per sow; P<0.01), CH4 (10.15 v. 15.21 g/day per sow; P<0.001), CO2 equivalents (1.11 v. 1.55 kg/day per sow; P<0.001), CO2 (2.12 v. 2.41 kg/day per sow; P,0<001) and H2O (3.10 v. 3.68 kg/day per sow; P<0.001). In conclusion, an increase of the available area for group-housed gestating sow kept on straw-based deep litter seems to be ambiguous on an environmental impacts point of view. Compared with a conventional and legal available area, it favoured NH3 emissions, probably due to an increased emitting surface. However, about greenhouse gases, it decreased N2O, CH4 and CO2 emissions, probably due to reduced anaerobic conditions required for their synthesis, and led to a reduction of CO2 equivalents emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailEffets de la surface disponible et du type de sol sur les émissions gazeuses lors de l’élevage de truies gestantes
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Canart, Bernard et al

in 42èmes Journées de la Recherche Porcine (2010)

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See detailGaseous emissions from group-housed gestating sows kept on deep litter and offered an ad libitum high-fibre diet
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Canart, Bernard; Laitat, Martine ULg et al

in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment (2009), 132

Gaseous emissions from agriculture contribute to a number of environmental effects. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are greenhouse gases taking part in the global problem of ... [more ▼]

Gaseous emissions from agriculture contribute to a number of environmental effects. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are greenhouse gases taking part in the global problem of climate change. Ammonia (NH3) emissions are responsible of soil and water acidification and eutrophication and contribute also to indirect emissions of N2O. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of a high-fibre diet offered ad libitum to gestating sows on gaseous emissions (NH3, N2O, CH4, CO2 and water vapour (H2O)). Four successive batches of 10 gestating sows were used for this trial. Each batch was divided into 2 homogeneous groups randomly allocated to a treatment: restricted conventional cereals based diet or high-fibre diet based on sugar beet pulp (42%). The groups were separately kept in two identical rooms equipped with a straw-bedded pen of 12.6 m². For restricted sows, meals were provided once a day in individual feeding stalls available only during the feeding time. In both rooms, ventilation was automatically adapted to maintain a constant ambient temperature. The gas emissions were measured by infrared photoacoustic detection during 6 consecutive days at the 6th, 9th and 12th weeks of gestation. Sows performance (body weight gain, backfat thickness, number and weight of piglets) was not significantly different according to the diet. With sows offered high-fibre diet and compared to sows offered restricted diet, gaseous emissions were significantly greater for NH3 (9.64 g NH3-N d-1 sow-1 vs. 5.37 g NH3-N d-1 sow-1; P < 0.001), CH4 (17.20 g d-1 sow-1 vs. 15.21 g d-1 sow-1; P < 0.01), CO2 (3.00 kg d-1 sow-1 vs. 2.41 kg d-1 sow-1; P < 0.001) and H2O (4.71 kg d-1 sow-1 vs. 3.68 kg d-1 sow-1; P < 0.001) and significantly lower for N2O (0.97 g N2O-N d-1 sow-1 vs. 2.48 g N2O-N d-1 sow-1; P < 0.001) and CO2 equivalents (0.88 kg d-1 sow-1 vs. 1.55 kg d-1 sow-1; P < 0.001). In conclusion, the effects of high-fibre diet offered to gestating sows on deep litter on environment seem ambiguous with an increase of NH3 emissions but a decrease of N2O and CO2 equivalent emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailGaseous emissions associated to a high-fibre diet fed to gestating sows group-housed on deep litter
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Canart, B.; Laitat, Martine ULg et al

in Proceeding of the XIV ISAH Congress (2009)

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See detailEffects of space allowance on gas emissions from group-housed gestating sows
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Canart, Bernard et al

in Book of abstract of the 60th Annual meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2009)

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See detailGaseous emissions from weaned pigs raised on different floor systems
Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg et al

in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment (2009), 130

Gaseous emissions from agriculture contribute to a number of environmental effects. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are greenhouse gases taking part to the global problem of ... [more ▼]

Gaseous emissions from agriculture contribute to a number of environmental effects. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are greenhouse gases taking part to the global problem of climate change. Ammonia (NH3) emissions are responsible of soil acidification and eutrophication and contribute also to indirect emissions of N2O. This work evaluated the influence of the type of floor on the emissions of these gases in the raising of weaned pigs. Two trials were carried out. In the first trial, the animals were kept either on fully slatted floor or on straw-based deep litter and, in the second one, either on fully slatted floor or on sawdust-based deep litter. For each trial and on each type of floor, 2 successive batches of weaned pigs were raised without changing the litter or emptying the slurry pit between the 2 batches. The rooms were automatically ventilated to maintain a constant ambient temperature. The performance of the animals was not significantly different according to the floor type. In trial 1, the nitrogen contents of the straw deep litter (including the substrate) and slurry were respectively 276 and 389 g pig-1. In trial 2, the sawdust deep litter and slurry nitrogen contents were respectively 122 and 318 g pig-1. Raising pigs on straw deep litter produced proportionately around 100% more NH3 than raising pigs on slatted floor (0.61 vs. 0.31 g NH3-N d-1 per pig; P<0.05). Differences in CO2, H2O and CH4 emissions were not significant between systems. Raising pigs on sawdust deep litter produced also proportionately more NH3 (+52%; 0.55 vs. 0.36 g NH3-N d-1 per pig; P<0.01) but also more CO2 (+25%; 427 vs. 341 g d-1 per pig; P<0.001) and H2O (+65%; 981 vs. 593 g d-1 per pig; P<0.001) and less CH4 (-40%; 0.52 vs. 0.86 g d-1 per pig; P<0.001) than raising pigs on slatted floor. Practically no N2O emission was observed from rooms with slatted floor while the N2O emissions were 0.03 and 0.32 g N2O-N d-1 per pig for the straw and sawdust deep litter respectively. The warming potential of the greenhouse gases (N2O + CH4), were about 22, 34 and 168 g CO2 equivalents per day and per pig on fully slatted floor, straw or sawdust deep litter respectively. In conclusion, pollutant gas emissions from rearing of weaned pig seem lower with fully slatted plastic floor system than with deep litter systems [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of feed-, nitrogen-, fibres- and water-intakes on emissions of NH3, N2O, CH4, CO2 and water vapour of grouped gestating sows kept on straw-based deep litter
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Canart, Bernard; Laitat, Martine ULg et al

in 13th RAMIRAN International Conference, Potential for simple technology solutions in organic management (2008)

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See detailMilk urea content: effects of environmental parameters and relationships with other milk traits
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Istasse, Louis ULg et al

in Biodiversity and animal feed. Future challenges for grassland production. Proceedings of the 22nd General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (2008)

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See detailLes fibres dans l’alimentation des truies gestantes : effets sur la nutrition, le comportement, les performances et les rejets dans l’environnement
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Remience, Virginie; Dourmard et al

in Productions Animales (2008), 21(3), 277-290

Feeding gestating sows with high fibre diets (HFD) helps induce satiety without excessive energy intake. Neutral Detergent Fibre (NDF) (15-20%) enables sows to adapt their feed intake to their needs ... [more ▼]

Feeding gestating sows with high fibre diets (HFD) helps induce satiety without excessive energy intake. Neutral Detergent Fibre (NDF) (15-20%) enables sows to adapt their feed intake to their needs. Therefore, ad libitum feeding becomes possible, reducing the costs of feeding equipment. Fibre effect on the feeling of satiety is due among others to the higher amount of feed intake, the increase of eating time and delay in gastric emptying. Sow welfare improvement due to the feeling of satiety has for consequence a reduction in the occurrence of stereotypes and aggressions. The disadvantage of HFD feeding is linked to a reduction of cell component accessibility to digestive and microbial enzymes. However, energy efficiency of fibre degradation is better for sows than for growing pigs. If the amount of feed offered takes into account the reduction in energy digestibility, sow performance is not affected. Besides, the increased capacity of the digestive tract may result in an increased capacity of the digestive tract may result in an increased feed intake during early lactation, supporting higher milk production and limiting the body reserve mobilisation. On the environmental level, increasing fibre content reduces ammonia emissions but increases methane emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between leptin content, metabolic hormones and fat deposition in three beef cattle breeds.
Daix, Marie; Pirotte, Cécile; Bister, Jean-Loup et al

in Veterinary Journal (2008), 177

The aim of the study was to determine if cattle breeds differing in their carcass characteristics also differ in the profiles of their leptin and metabolic hormones. Three breeds, Belgian Blue (BB) (n=12 ... [more ▼]

The aim of the study was to determine if cattle breeds differing in their carcass characteristics also differ in the profiles of their leptin and metabolic hormones. Three breeds, Belgian Blue (BB) (n=12), Limousin (L) (n=12) and Aberdeen Angus (AA) (n=12) with varying ability to deposit fat and protein were compared. Blood, muscle and subcutaneous (SC) adipose tissue were sampled. Animal performance, carcass and meat characteristics were determined as well as plasma leptin concentration, leptin gene expression in SC adipose tissue, leptin-receptor gene expression in SC adipose tissue and plasma concentration of insulin, tri-iodothyronin (T3), thyroxin (T4) and cortisol. The BB bulls showed the lowest values of leptin gene expression (P<0.05). Values of plasma leptin concentration and of leptin-receptor gene expression tended to be lower in BB than in the other breeds. For a similar amount of adipose tissue (after normalisation), BB bulls showed a higher ratio of plasma leptin (P<0.05), whereas normalised leptin gene and leptin-receptor gene expressions did not significantly differ between breeds. Belgian Blue bulls also differed in their metabolic hormone profile, tending to show lower values of insulin, T3 and T4 than the two other breeds. Cortisol levels were significantly lower (P<0.05) in BB than in L and AA animals. [less ▲]

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See detailOrganic selenium providing by selenized fertilisation in grazed grass, grass and maize silage for beef and dairy cows.
Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Dotreppe, Olivier ULg et al

in Biodiversity and animal feed. Future challenges for grassland production. Proceedings of the 22nd General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (2008)

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See detailMilk urea content: effects of environmental parameters and relationships with other milk traits
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Istasse, Louis ULg et al

in Biodiversity and animal feed. Future challenges for grassland production. Book of abstracts. 22nd General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (2008)

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See detailOrganic selenium providing by selenized fertilisation in grazed grass, grass and maize silage for beef and dairy cows
Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Dotreppe, Olivier ULg et al

in Biodiversity and animal feed. Future challenges for grassland production. Book of abstracts. 22nd General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (2008)

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See detailEssential fatty acids content in beef meat as influenced by crushed, flaked or extruded linseeds
Robaye, Vincent ULg; Dotreppe, Olivier ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in book of abstract of the 59th Annual meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2008)

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See detailCarcasses of Belgian Blue double muscle culled cows or growing fattening bulls: essential fatty acids content in 17 meat pieces
Robaye, Vincent ULg; Dotreppe, Olivier ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in book of abstract of the 59th Annual meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2008)

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See detailDevelopment of a radioimmunoassay for bovine chymosin B
Idrissa-Sidikou, Djibo; Remy, Benoit; Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg et al

in Tropicultura (2007), 25(3), 134-139

The present study was conducted to develop and validate a specific radioimmunoassay system for measurement of bovine chymosin B (bChyB) concentrations in plasma samples. Bovine ChyB was used for ... [more ▼]

The present study was conducted to develop and validate a specific radioimmunoassay system for measurement of bovine chymosin B (bChyB) concentrations in plasma samples. Bovine ChyB was used for immunization of rabbits and as standard and tracer. Chymosin B concentrations were measured in plasma samples from two groups of calves (Group 1: calves sampled from birth to 24 hours; Group 2: calves sampled from Day 1 to 21 after birth) and from one cow during the peri-partum period. Detection limit of the assay was 9.0 ng/mL. Recovery was higher than 89.3%. Repeatability and reproducibility ranged from 1.52% to 5.23% and from 1.52% to 12.57% respectively. No cross-reaction was found with pepsinogen A from bovine, porcine or human origins. In Group 1, bChyB concentrations increased from 47.3±45.1 ng/mL (5 min after birth) to 325.5±161.2 ng/mL (12 hours after birth), then it decreased till 293.0±161.5 ng/mL (24 hours after birth). In Group 2, concentrations decreased from Day 1 (455.3±191.1 ng/mL) to Day 21 (117.9±85.1 ng/mL). In adult cow, mean concentration was 136.0±32.3 ng/mL. In conclusion, bChyB is able to cross the stomach basal membrane and to reach the blood circulation at detectable levels in both young calves and adult cows. [less ▲]

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