References of "COUCKE, Philippe"
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See detailCytotoxic interactions of 5-fluorouracil and nucleoside analogues in vitro
Li, Y-X; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Paschoud, N et al

in Anticancer Research (1997), 17(1A), 21-27

The cytotoxic interaction of combined 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with different nucleoside analogues was investigated in vitro on a colon (WiDr) and a breast (MCF-7) cancer cell line. Azidothymidine (AZT), 3 ... [more ▼]

The cytotoxic interaction of combined 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with different nucleoside analogues was investigated in vitro on a colon (WiDr) and a breast (MCF-7) cancer cell line. Azidothymidine (AZT), 3'-deoxy-2', 3'-didehydrothymidine (D4T), 5-iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (DDC) were tested at different concentrations (5-600 microM) as modulators of 5-FU. The experimental endpoints were cellular viability and cell cycle distribution. The combination of 5-FU and AZT or D4T yielded supra-additive cytotoxic effects in both cell lines at all concentrations. On WiDr, IdUrd at high concentrations of 50 and 100 microM showed a supra-additive effect whereas at low concentrations (5, 10 and 20 microM) the effect was antagonistic. 5-FU combined with IdUrd produced a synergistic effect on MCF-7 cells at all concentrations. DDC antagonised the toxic effect of 5-FU on the WiDr cell line. In WiDr cells, a significant increase in the overall S-phase was observed 48 and 72 hours after exposure to D4T, AZT and DDC at the low concentration of 10 microM. On the contrary, this accumulation in S-phase was not present in MCF-7 cells. The combined effect of 5-FU and nucleoside analogues in vitro is dependent on the type and concentration of nucleosides and the cell-line tested. AZT, D4T and IdUrd are more likely to be subjected to more intensive in vitro and in vivo research as far as modulation of 5-FU toxicity is concerned. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of the radiosensitizing effect of (E)-24-deoxy-(fluoromethylene)cytidine (FMdC)by thymide analogues AZT, D4T and idUrd.
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Cottin, E; Li, Y-X et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1997), 43(supp 2), 13

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See detailEffect of neuropeptides on cultured postnatal auditory neurons.
Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Lefebvre, P.P.; Rigo, J.M. et al

Conference (1997)

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See detailPredicting response in head and neck cancer: The search for the holy grall
COUCKE, Philippe ULg

in European Journal of Cancer (1997), 33(supp 8), 289-290

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See detailInformation transfer between angiographic films and CT images: a tool to delineate the target volume
Tercier, P-A; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Fankhauser, H et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1997), 45

Abstract Background and purpose: This work was undertaken to improve the definition of target volumes for radiosurgery using the angiographic and CT data. Materials and methods: The basis of this new ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background and purpose: This work was undertaken to improve the definition of target volumes for radiosurgery using the angiographic and CT data. Materials and methods: The basis of this new method is to combine both imaging modalities and to compare them in each representation, i.e. to plot the volume obtained by angiography on CT images and also the contours defined by the CT on angiographic films. To obtain the angiographic volume, the radiographs are taken at several incidence angles. The X-ray sources position and the position of the films are determined using rectangular markers, then the intersection of all the loci of the target volume are calculated. Results: Verifications with a phantom show the accuracy of the procedure and the benefit obtained by increasing the number of angles of incidence in the angiographic imaging. The centre of gravity of the experimental target could be localized to an accuracy of better than 0.4 mm. The method was used in 11 clinical cases with excellent clinical results. Conclusions: The method can be easily applied and improves the delineation of target volumes in radiosurgery. CT data counterbalances the relative weakness of angiography concerning the three-dimensional geometry. Angiography adds useful information on the blood flow that is not shown in CT. Almost all the presented clinical cases benefit from the technique described here. [less ▲]

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See detailSeminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism: treatment and prognosis in 66 patients
Li, Y-X; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Qian, T-L et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1997), 36

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze prognosis and treatment results for seminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism (SCIC and SUIC). Methods and Materials: We ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze prognosis and treatment results for seminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism (SCIC and SUIC). Methods and Materials: We reviewed 66 patients with inguinal seminomas between June 1958 and December 1991 at the Cancer Hospital and Institute of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. Of these patients, 23 had prior orchiopexy and 43 presented with an inguinal form of cryptorchidism. At presentation, 17 of 66 (26%) patients had nodal metastases. This nodal involvement was 30% (7 of 23) for SCIC and 23% (10 of 43) for SUIC, respectively. These numbers are comparable with those in a series of patients treated for scrotal seminoma at our institution (26% vs. 20%). However, 3 of 23 (13%) patients who had prior orchiopexy presented with inguinal nodal metastasis as compared with 0 of 43 patients with SUIC or 4 of 237 patients with scrotal seminoma (p < .05). There were 49 stage I, 5 stage IIA, 8 stage IIB, 3 stage III, and 1 stage IV patients. All patients underwent radical orchiectomy and received further radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or both. Patients with stage I and stage II disease were treated primarily with radiotherapy, whereas patients with stage III and IV disease were treated with chemotherapy. Results: The overall and disease-free survival at 5 and 10 years was 94% and 92%, 89% and 87%, respectively. The overall 5- and lo-year survival by stage was 100% and 100% for stage I, and 77% and 68% for stage II, respectively @ < .05). There was no significant difference in survival between SUIC and SCIC (93% vs. 96% at 5 years). Four patients developed relapse. Two of these four patients experienced relapse at the inguinal area, due to a marginal miss. Three of four patients with relapse were successfully salvaged, and one died of disease. Conclusion: Our results indicate that prognosis for inguinal seminoma is excellent and similar to that of scrotal seminoma. Postorchiectomy radiotherapy can be considered as the standard treatment for stage I and IIA inguinal seminoma. We recommend routinely including the para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodes. 0 1997 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailRadiation therapy duration influences overall survival in patients with cervix carcinoma.
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Delaloye, J-F; Pampallona, S et al

in International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics (1997), 57

of the cervix treated by radical radiation therapy. Method; Three hundred and sixty patients with FIG0 stage IB-IIIB carcinoma of the cervix were treated in Lausanne (Switzerland) with external radiation ... [more ▼]

of the cervix treated by radical radiation therapy. Method; Three hundred and sixty patients with FIG0 stage IB-IIIB carcinoma of the cervix were treated in Lausanne (Switzerland) with external radiation and brachytherapy as first line therapy. Median therapy duration was 45 days. Patients were classified according to the duration of the therapies, taking 60 days (the 75th percentile) as an arbitrary cut-off. Results: The 5-year survival was 61% (SE. = 3%) for the therapy duration group of less than 60 days and 53% (SE. = 7%) for the group of more than 60 days. In terms of univariate hazard ratio (HR), the relative difference between the hvo groups corresponds to a 50% increase of deaths (HR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.03-2.28) for the longer therapy duration group (P = 0.044). In a multivariate analysis, the magnitude of estimated relative hazards for the longer therapies are confirmed though significance was reduced (HR = 1.52, 95% CI = 0.94-2.45, P = 0.084). Conclusion: These findings suggesthat short treatment duration is a factor associated with longer survival in carcinoma of the cervix. 0 1997 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [less ▲]

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See detailTiming effect of combined radioimmunotherapy and radiotherapy on a human solid tumor in nude mice.
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Lin-Quan, Sun; Vogel, Charles-André et al

in Cancer Research (1997), 57

Timing effects of radioimmunotherapy (HIT) combined with external beam radiotherapy (RT) were assessed In human colon carcinoma xe nografts. Initially, dose effects offractlonated RT and RIT were ... [more ▼]

Timing effects of radioimmunotherapy (HIT) combined with external beam radiotherapy (RT) were assessed In human colon carcinoma xe nografts. Initially, dose effects offractlonated RT and RIT were evaluated separately. Then, 30 Gy RT (10 fractions over 12 days) were combined with three weekly Lv. injections of 200 g@Ci of 131I-labeled anti-carcino embryonic antigen monoclonal antibodies in four different treatment schedules. RIT was given either prior to, concurrently, Immediately after, or 2 weeks after RT administration. The longest regrowth delay (RD) of 105 days was observed in mice treated by concurrent administration of RT and lilT, whereas the RDs of RT and RIT alone were 34 and 20 days, respectively. The three sequential combination treatments produced sig nificantly shorter RDs ranging from 62 to 70 days. The tumor response represented by the minimal volume (MV) also showed that concurrent administration of RT and RIT gave the best result, with a mean MV of 4.5% as compared to MVs from 26 to 53% for the three sequential treatments. The results were confirmed In a second experiment, In which a RT of 40 Gy was combined with an identical lilT as above (three injections of 200 g&Ci of ‘31I-labeled monoclonal antibodies). At compa rable toxicity levels, the maximum tolerated RT or BIT alone gave shorter RDs and less tumor shrinkage compared to slinultaneous RT+RIT. These results may be useful for designing clinical protocols ofcombined RIT and RT. [less ▲]

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See detailPrimary radiation therapy or surgery combined or not to radiation therapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis
Zouhair, Abderrahim; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Douglas, Pelham et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1997), 39(2 (Supplément)), 295

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See detailAlteration of radiation response in vitro by simultaneous modulation of the de novo and salvage pathways to deoxynucleoside triphosphate pool by (E)-2′-Deoxy-(Fluoromethylene)cytidine and thymidine analogs
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Li, Ye-Xiong; Cottin, Eliane et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1997), 39(2 (supp1)), 257

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See detailClinical characteristics, prognosis and treatment for pelvic cryptorchid seminoma
Li; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Qian et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1997), 38(2), 351-357

Purpose: To analyze the clinical characteristics, prognosis, and treatment outcome of pelvic cryptorchid seminoma (PCS), and to determine whether whole abdominal-pelvic irradiation for Stage I disease is ... [more ▼]

Purpose: To analyze the clinical characteristics, prognosis, and treatment outcome of pelvic cryptorchid seminoma (PCS), and to determine whether whole abdominal-pelvic irradiation for Stage I disease is necessary. Methods and Materials: From 1958 to 1991,60 patients with PCS were treated at the Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing. They presented with a lower abdominal mass and showed a predominance for the right side. A high proportion of patients with PCS [ 26 of 60 (43% )] had metastatic disease, compared to 20% of those with scrotal seminoma, and there was a tendency toward a higher frequency of pelvic nodal metastases. There were 34 Stage I, 6 Stage IIA, 11 Stage IIB, 5 Stage III, and 4 Stage IV patients. Of these 60 patients, 56 underwent laparotomy with or without cryptorchiectomy (37 radical orchiectomy, 7 partial orchiectomy, and 12 biopsy of the primary or cervical node), and 4 cervical node biopsy only. All patients were further treated with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of both. Patients with Stage I and II disease received radiotherapy, whereas patients with Stage III and IV were treated with chemotherapy. Results: The overall and disease-free survivals at 5 and 10 years were 92% and 87%, and 88% and 84%, respectively. The 5- and lo-year survivals were 100% for Stage I, 94% and 87% for Stage II, and 56% and 42% for Stage III/IV, respectively @ < 0.05). Volume of irradiation, i.e., whole abdominal-pelvic radiotherapy ( 10 patients), versus hockey-stick encompassing paraaortic, ipsilateral iliac nodes and the primary tumor or tumor bed (17) did not influence outcome in Stage I patients. Five patients relapsed within 2-12 years after treatment, and four of these patients were successfully salvaged. Four patients developed a second malignant tumor and died. Conclusion: Stage I and II PCS can he adequately controlled by radiotherapy regardless of the surgical procedure. Whole abdominal-pelvic irradiation for Stage I and IIA disease is not required, and fields can be limited to the paraaortic, ipsilateral iliac nodes and primary tumor or tumor bed. We recommend platinum-based chemotherapy for Stage IIB-IV PCS. 0 1997 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailPrognostic factors in urothelial renal pelvis and ureter tumors: A multicenter Rare Cancer Network study
Ozsahin, Mahmut; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Villà, S. et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1997), 3(2(supp)), 290

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See detailAntitumor and radiosensitizing effects of (E)-2'-Deoxy-2'-(Fluoromethylene) cytidine, a novel inhibior of ribonucleotide diphosphate reductase on human colon carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.
Sun, Lin-Quan; Li, Ye-Xiong; Guillou, Louis et al

in Cancer Research (1997), 57

Antitumor and radiosensitizing effects of (E).2'-deoxy.2'-(fluromethyl ene) cytidine (FMdC), a novel inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, were evaluated on nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts and liver ... [more ▼]

Antitumor and radiosensitizing effects of (E).2'-deoxy.2'-(fluromethyl ene) cytidine (FMdC), a novel inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, were evaluated on nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts and liver metastases of a human colon carcinoma. FMdC given once daily or twice weekly has a dose-dependent antitumor effect. The maximum tolerated dose In the mice was reached with 10 mgi'kg applied daily over 12 days. Twice weekly administration of FMdC reduced its toxicity but lowered the antitumor effect. Treatment of preestablished liver micrometastases obtained via intrasplenic injection of tumor cells, with 5 or 10 mgfkg FMdC, signifi candy prolonged the survival of the mice as compared to controls (P < 0.025 and P < 0.001, respectively). Ten mg/kg resulted in longer survival than S mg/kg FMdC (P < 0.05). Radiotherapy alone of s.c. xenografts (10 fractions over 12 days) yielded the radiation dose required to produce local tumor control in 50% of the treated mice (TCD@O)of 43.0 Gy. When combined with FMdC, TCDsawas reduced to 22.5 and 19.0 Gy at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg given i.p. 1 h before each irradiation, respec tively. The corresponding enhancement ratios were 1.91 and 2.43, respec lively. FMdC produced moderate and reversible myelosuppression. When 5 mg/kg FMdC was combined with irradiation, there was no increased skin or hematological toxicity as compared to radiotherapy or FMdC alone. At the 10 mg/kg level, however, lower leukocyte counts were observed. These results show that FMdC appears to be a potent anticancer drug and radiosensitizer [less ▲]

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See detailRadiotherapie externe focalisee apres resection de metastase cerebrale unique: etude prospective de phase I-II
Zouhair; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Douglas, Pelham et al

in Bulletin du Cancer. Radiothérapie : Journal de la Société Française du Cancer : Organe de la Société Française de Radiothérapie Oncologique (1997), 1

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See detailCell-line specific radiosensitizing effect of zalcitabine (DDC)
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Li, Ye-Xiong; Copaceanu, Marie-Laure et al

in Acta Oncologica (1997)

The potential of zalcitabine (ddC) to act as an ionizing radiation response modifier was tested on exponentially growing human cancer cells in vitro. Two human cell lines, WiDr (colon) and MCF-7 (breast ... [more ▼]

The potential of zalcitabine (ddC) to act as an ionizing radiation response modifier was tested on exponentially growing human cancer cells in vitro. Two human cell lines, WiDr (colon) and MCF-7 (breast) were exposed to ddC at 10 p M concentration for various lengths of tide (18, 24, 48 and 72 h). On the WiDr cell line the dual effect of concentration and duration of exposure prior to irradiation was investigated. Experimental endpoints were clonogenicity and viability, as measured by colony formation assay (CFA) and MTT assay respectively. The impact on cell-cycle distribution prior to irradiation was assessed by flow cytometry using a double labeling technique (propidium iodide and bromodeoxyuridine pulse label). A significant reduction in surviving fraction and viability was observed for WiDr-cells irradiated after pre-exposure to 10 pM for 18, 48 and 72 h as compared to corresponding irradiated controls. At lower concentrations (1 and 5 pM), the radiosensitizing effect was only significant after a 72-h exposure (assessed by CFA). For MCF-7, ddC induced a significant modification of the dose response only with 24 and 48 h preincubation. However, the overall effect was less pronounced as compared to WiDr. Cell-cycle analysis showed accumulation in S-phase, 48 and 72 h after treatment with 10 pM ddC in the WiDr cells, with a progressive shift to late S-phase as shown by the biparametric analysis. The degree of radiosensitization is cell-line dependent with the most important sensitization observed on the most <<radioresistant cell line>>, ix., the cell line with the lowest alpha value and highest SF 2 (WiDr). For WiDr, radiosensitization by ddC depends on the duration of exposure and the concentration of the drug. Received 29 February 1996 Accepted 10 December 1996 [less ▲]

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See detailNew ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, (E)-2′-deoxy-(fluromethylene) cytidine, acts as a radiosensitizer on human colon and cervix cancer cell lines
Coucke, Philippe ULg; LI, XY; Cottin, E et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1996), 40(Supplément 1), 135

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See detailPotential doubling time determination in a multicentre clinical study.
COUCKE, Philippe ULg

in Abstract book (1996)

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See detailEffect of total treatment time on event-free survival in carcinoma of the cervix
Delaloye, J-F; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Pampallona, S et al

in Gynecologic Oncology (1996), 60

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