References of "COLLETTE, Julien"
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See detailDevelopment of new immunoassays for the quantification of inflammatory related cartilage degradation
Deberg, Michelle ULg; Christgau, Stephan; Henriksen, Dennis et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2002, September), 46(number 9 (suppl.)), 496

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See detailBaseline measurement of urine pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline is correlated with 3-year hip osteoarthritis progression
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; COLLETTE, Julien ULg; Lejeune, Eric ULg et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2002, September), 46(number 9 (suppl.)), 149

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See detailAdministration of a supplement containing both calcium and vitamin D is more effective than calcium alone to reduce secondary hyperparathyroidism in postmenopausal women with low 25(OH)vitamin D circulating levels
Deroisy, Rita ULg; Collette, Julien ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Aging Clinical & Experimental Research (2002), 14(1), 13-17

Background and aims: Supplementation of postmenopausal women with calcium alone or calcium-vitamin D association was suggested to have positive effects on bone turnover and bone density, as well as to ... [more ▼]

Background and aims: Supplementation of postmenopausal women with calcium alone or calcium-vitamin D association was suggested to have positive effects on bone turnover and bone density, as well as to lower fracture incidence. The beneficial effect appears to be mediated by a reduction in parathyroid hormone secretion. Our aim was to compare the respective efficacy of calcium and calcium-vitamin D supplements in reducing serum parathyroid hormone levels in postmenopausal women with prevalent low 25(OH)vitamin D levels. Methods: One hundred consecutive ambulatory postmenopausal women with serum 25(OH)vitamin D levels below 18 ng/mL were included in a randomized, prospective, open label study. For a duration of 90 days, the women were randomly assigned to a daily supplementation of either one tablet of calcium gluconolactate and carbonate (500 mg calcium), or one powder-pack of an association of calcium carbonate (500 mg calcium), citric acid (2.175 gr) and cholecalciferol (200 IU). Changes observed during the 90 days of the study in circulating PTH levels were the primary endpoint, while changes in serum 25(OH)D levels were assessed as secondary endpoint. Results: A significant difference was observed between the calcium-vitamin D (CaD) and the calcium (Ca) only groups for changes occurring during the 90 days of the study in PTH (-14.5 +/- 40% and +2.5 +/- 46%) (p=0.009) and 25(OH)D (+67 +/- 77% and +18 +/- 55%) (p<0.001) circulating levels. PTH changes between baseline and day 90 were significant in the CaD group, but not in the Ca group. The odds ratio for a patient in group Ca to experience an absolute (<12 ng/mL) deficiency in circulating 25(OH)vitamin D levels, compared to a group CaD patient was statistically increased (OR: 3.22, 95% CI: 1.33-7.80). Conclusions: Our results support the recommendation of supplementing postmenopausal women with low circulating levels of 25(OH)vitamin D with a combination of calcium and vitamin D, rather than with calcium alone. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of High Doses of Oral Risedronate (20 Mg/Day) on Serum Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Urinary Collagen Cross-Link Excretion in Postmenopausal Women with Spinal Osteoporosis
Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Eastell, R.; Russell, R. G. et al

in BONE (2001), 28(1), 108-12

The present study describes the biological effects of risedronate, a pyridinyl bisphosphonate, on bone and assesses the safety and tolerability of risedronate when given at high doses, with or without ... [more ▼]

The present study describes the biological effects of risedronate, a pyridinyl bisphosphonate, on bone and assesses the safety and tolerability of risedronate when given at high doses, with or without calcium, to postmenopausal women with spinal osteoporosis. This single-center descriptive, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel group study included 32 postmenopausal white women with at least one radiographically confirmed vertebral compression fracture. Patients were randomized to one of four different dose regimen groups: (i) R-P, risedronate 20 mg/day for 14 days, followed by placebo for 42 days; (ii) R-CP-P, risedronate 20 mg/day for 14 days, followed by elemental calcium 1000 mg/day and placebo for 14 days, then by placebo for 28 days; (iii) R-CP-R-CP, risedronate 20 mg/day for 7 days, followed by elemental calcium 1000 mg/day and placebo for 21 days, then risedronate 20 mg/day for 7 days, and finally elemental calcium 1000 mg/day and placebo for 21 days; and (iv) P, placebo for 56 days. The biological response was investigated by measuring serum calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and 2 h urinary pyridinoline/creatinine (Pyr/Cr) and deoxypyridinoline/creatinine (DPyr/Cr) ratios at baseline and at days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, and 84. Overall, there were no consistent trends observed between the active group and placebo for serum calcium. In groups R-P, R-CP-P, and R-CP-R-CP, mean serum PTH levels were elevated above baseline values for the entire 56 day treatment period and remained elevated, although to a lesser extent, at the day 84 follow-up visit. The effect of calcium supplementation on PTH was variable. Urinary Pyr/Cr and DPyr/Cr ratios were decreased from baseline over the entire study period in all groups receiving risedronate. The maximum observed percent decreases from baseline for Pyr/Cr and DPyr/Cr were -46.9% and -58.8%, respectively, at day 49 in the R-CP-R-CP group. In conclusion, risedronate given orally at a dose of 20 mg/day, continuously for 7 or 14 days, resulted in the expected biological response in osteoporotic women. The time course of changes in PTH levels following cessation of dosing was unaffected by calcium supplementation. There was no evidence of a PTH-mediated rebound in bone resorption following cessation of therapy. Furthermore, based on collagen cross-link data, patients did not show an excessive reduction in bone turnover. [less ▲]

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See detailRespective value of four biochemical markers of bone resorption for the diagnosis of postmenopausal osteoporosis and the monitoring of anti-resorptive therapies
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Taquet, A. N.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 421

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See detailThymic Expression of Insulin-Related Genes in an Animal Model of Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes
Kecha-Kamoun, Ouafae; Achour, Imane; Martens, Henri ULg et al

in Diabetes/Metabolism Research & Reviews (2001), 17(2, Mar-Apr), 146-52

BACKGROUND: Insulin and multiple other autoantigens have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes, but the origin of immunological self-reactivity specifically oriented against ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Insulin and multiple other autoantigens have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes, but the origin of immunological self-reactivity specifically oriented against insulin-secreting islet beta-cells remains obscure. The primary objective of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that a defect in thymic central T-cell self-tolerance of the insulin hormone family could contribute to the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes. This hypothesis was investigated in a classic animal model of type 1 diabetes, the Bio-Breeding (BB) rat. METHODS: The expression of the mammalian insulin-related genes (Ins, Igf1 and Igf2) was analysed in the thymus of inbred Wistar Furth rats (WF), diabetes-resistant BB (BBDR) and diabetes-prone BB (BBDP) rats. RESULTS: RT-PCR analyses of total RNA from WF, BBDP and BBDR thymi revealed that Igf1 and Ins mRNAs are present in 15/15 thymi from 2-day-old, 5-day-old and 5-week-old WF, BBDR and BBDP rats. In contrast, a complete absence of Igf2 mRNA was observed in more than 80% of BBDP thymi. The absence of detectable Igf2 transcripts in the thymus of BBDP rats is tissue-specific, since Igf2 mRNAs were detected in all BBDP brains and livers examined. Using a specific immunoradiometric assay, the concentration of thymic IGF-2 protein was significantly lower in BBDP than in BBDR rats (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests an association between the emergence of autoimmune diabetes and a defect in Igf2 expression in the thymus of BBDP rats. This tissue-specific defect in gene expression could contribute both to the lymphopenia of these rats (by impaired T-cell development) and the absence of central T-cell self-tolerance of the insulin hormone family (by defective negative selection of self-reactive T-cells). [less ▲]

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See detailBone resorption in post-menopausal women with normal and low BMD assessed with biochemical markers specific for telopeptide derived degradation products of collagen type I
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Christiansen, C. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2001), 69(3), 130-137

Biochemical markers of bone resorption can be used clinically to predict the risk of osteoporosis-related fractures (prognostic tool) and to assess the response of an osteoporotic patient to an ... [more ▼]

Biochemical markers of bone resorption can be used clinically to predict the risk of osteoporosis-related fractures (prognostic tool) and to assess the response of an osteoporotic patient to an antiresorptive therapy (monitoring tool). Our aim was to assess the ability of four currently marketed biochemical markers of bone resorption, based on the measurement of degradation products from collage type I telopeptides to monitor the elevated resorption associated with menopause. Women (846) were stratified for menopause, age, and bone mineral density and the following markers were measured: urinary cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTx), the levels of breakdown products of type I collagen C-telopeptides in serum (S-CTx), and in urine, by ELISA (U-CTx-E), and RIA (U-CTx-R). Furthermore, the ratio (a/b) between the aL form of CTx measured in the CTx RIA and the bL form measured in the ELISA was calculated. The mean difference was calculated for each marker in women with osteopenia (Op) or osteoporosis (PMO) (WHO definition) compared with healthy premenopausal (Pre) women and postmenopausal (N Post) women with normal bone mass. Serum CTx showed the highest elevation in post- compared with premenopausal women. All marker values were significantly higher in Op and PMO subjects compared with both Pre and to N Post women. Compared with premenopausal values, the largest elevation in both Op and PMO women was observed for serum CTx. Compared with N Post, urine NTx showed the highest increase in OP subjects. The a/b CTx ratio was elevated in post- compared with Pre women, but there was no difference in the ratio among N Post, Op, or PMO women. In conclusion, postmenopausal women showed elevated turnover with all bone resorption markers, but with substantial individual variation in resorption levels. Furthermore, the turnover process in postmenopausal women appears to be quantitatively different from the premenopausal stage, apparent as altered a/b CTx ratios. [less ▲]

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