References of "Bruyère, Olivier"
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See detailConnected devices in musculo-skeletal health
Bruyère, Olivier ULiege

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(S1), 88

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See detailRole of nutrition and physical exercise in maintaining intrinsic capacity
Bruyère, Olivier ULiege

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(S1), 84

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See detailValidation of the SarQoL, a specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for Sarcopenia
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Biver, Emmanuel; Reginster, Jean-Yves et al

in Journal of cachexia, sarcopenia and muscle (2017), 8(2), 238-44

Background A specific self-administrated health-related quality of life questionnaire for sarcopenia, the Sarcopenia and Quality Of Life (SarQoL®), has been recently developed. This questionnaire is ... [more ▼]

Background A specific self-administrated health-related quality of life questionnaire for sarcopenia, the Sarcopenia and Quality Of Life (SarQoL®), has been recently developed. This questionnaire is composed of 55 items translated into 22 questions and organized into seven domains of quality of life. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the psychometric properties (discriminative power, validity, reliability, floor and ceiling effects) of the SarQoL® questionnaire. Methods Sarcopenic subjects were recruited in an outpatient clinic in Liège, Belgium and were diagnosed according to the algorithm developed by the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. We compared the score of the SarQoL® between sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic subjects using a logistic regression after adjustment for potential confounding variables. Internal consistency reliability was determined using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient; construct validity was assessed using convergent and divergent validities. Test–retest reliability was verified after a two-week interval using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). At last, floor and ceiling effects were also tested. Results A total of 296 subjects with a median age of 73.3 (68.9–78.6) years were recruited for this study. Among them, 43 were diagnosed sarcopenic. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, the total score and the scores of the different dimensions of the SarQoL® questionnaire were significantly lower for sarcopenic than for non-sarcopenic subjects (54.7 (45.9– 66.3) for sarcopenic vs. 67.8 (57.3 – 79.0) for non sarcopenic, OR 0.93 (95%CI 0.90–0.96)). Regarding internal consistency, the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.87. The SarQoL® questionnaire data showed good correlation with some domains of the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) and the EuroQoL 5-dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaires and with the mobility test. An excellent agreement between the test and the retest was found with an ICC of 0.91 (95% CI 0.82–0.95). At last, neither floor nor ceiling effects were detected. Conclusions The SarQoL® questionnaire is valid, consistent, and reliable and can therefore be recommended for clinical and research purposes. However, its sensitivity to change needs to be assessed in future longitudinal studies. [less ▲]

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See detailHealth outcomes of sarcopenia: a systematic review and metaanalysis.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Zaaria, M.; Pasleau, Françoise ULiege et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28 Suppl 1

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See detailResults of the SarcoPhAge study after 2 years of follow-up.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2017), 6 Suppl 1

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See detailHealth outcomes of sarcopenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Zaaria, M.; Pasleau, Françoise ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2017), 6 Suppl 1

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See detailL'étude SarcoPhAge: devenir des sujets sarcopéniques après 2 ans de suivi.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in L'Année Gérontologique (2017), 31(1), 42

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See detailAnalyse des conséquences cliniques de la sarcopénie: une revue systématique et méta-analyse.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Zaaria, M.; Pasleau, F. et al

in L'année Gérontologique (2017), 31(1), 18

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See detailOsteoporosis in Frail Patients: A Consensus Paper of the Belgian Bone Club.
Gielen, E.; Bergmann, P.; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2017), 101(2), 111-31

In this consensus paper, the Belgian Bone Club aims to provide a state of the art on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis in frail individuals, including patients with anorexia ... [more ▼]

In this consensus paper, the Belgian Bone Club aims to provide a state of the art on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis in frail individuals, including patients with anorexia nervosa, patients on dialysis, cancer patients, persons with sarcopenia, and the oldest old. All these conditions may indeed induce bone loss that is superimposed on physiological bone loss and often remains under-recognized and under-treated. This is of particular concern because of the major burden of osteoporotic fractures in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic cost. Therefore, there is an urgent need to appreciate bone loss associated with these conditions, as this may improve diagnosis and management of bone loss and fracture risk in clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailReliability of muscle strength measures obtained with a hand-held dynamometer in an elderly population.
Buckinx, Fanny ULiege; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Clinical Physiology & Functional Imaging (2017), 37(3), 332-40

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to assess the reliability of a hand-held dynamometer for isometric strength measurements among nursing home residents. METHODS: The isometric muscle strength of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to assess the reliability of a hand-held dynamometer for isometric strength measurements among nursing home residents. METHODS: The isometric muscle strength of nursing home residents was assessed for eight different muscle groups, using a hand-held dynamometer, the MicroFET2 device. Strength measurements were performed at baseline and after 4 days by the same operator and after 8 days by a second operator. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were computed to assess the relative reliability, whereas the minimal detectable change (MDC%) was calculated to assess the absolute reliability of the test-retest of the MicroFET2 used by one single operator or by two different ones. RESULTS: Thirty nursing home residents (75.0 +/- 11.2 years, 50% of women) were enrolled in this study. ICC of the test-retest with one single operator ranged from 0.60 (0.37-0.83) for the ankle extensors to 0.85 (0.74-0.95) for the elbow flexors. When considering the test-retest with two different operators, the ICC values ranged from 0.62 (0.41-0.84) for the ankle extensors to 0.87 (0.79-0.96) for the elbow extensors. For the absolute reliability, MDC% varies from 27.64 (elbow flexors) to 81.97 (ankle extensors) when performed in intra-observer. In interobserver condition, MDC%, respectively, varies from 24.38 (elbow extensors) 67.59 (ankle extensors). CONCLUSION: Using standardized protocol and standardized instructions to patients, a high relative and moderate absolute reliability was observed for all but ankle muscle groups, making this hand-held dynamometer a potential tool for research in the elderly population. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of concomitant bone and muscle wasting in elderly women from the SarcoPhAge cohort: preliminary results
Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2017), 6(1), 18-23

Background: Recent studies suggest that bone and muscle wasting are closely interconnected. Objective: The aim was of this study is to assess the prevalence of osteoporosis in a population of women ... [more ▼]

Background: Recent studies suggest that bone and muscle wasting are closely interconnected. Objective: The aim was of this study is to assess the prevalence of osteoporosis in a population of women diagnosed with sarcopenia. Participants, setting and design: We analyzed cross-sectional data of women, aged 65 years and above, for whom bone mineral density was available at the time of inclusion in the SarcoPhAge (Sarcopenia and Physical impairment with advancing Age) cohort, an ongoing prospective study with the aim to assess consequences of sarcopenia. Measurements: Muscle strength was evaluated with a hydraulic hand-dynamometer, appendicular lean mass and bone mineral density by Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and physical performance by the Short Physical Performance Battery test (SPPB). Sarcopenia was diagnosed according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People definition, i.e. a low muscle mass plus either low muscle strength or low physical performance. A bone mineral density T-score equal to or below -2.5SD at the lumbar spine, at the total hip or at the femoral neck was used to define osteoporosis (World Health Organization definition). Results: A total of 126 women aged 74.38±6.32 years were included. Among them, 26 were assessed with sarcopenia (20.6%) and 34 (27.0%) with osteoporosis. There were more osteoporotic women among sarcopenic subjects (46.1%) than among non-sarcopenic subjects (22.0%) (p-value=0.011). A significant lower appendicular lean mass index was observed in osteoporotic women (p-value=0.025). We also observed, in osteoporotic subjects, a lower muscle strength (p-value=0.023). Numerical values of bone mineral density were lower in the sarcopenic population but the differences did not reach the level of statistical significance. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that muscle mass and strength are lower in patients with osteoporosis. Prospective changes in bone and muscle mass will be investigated during the follow-up of our cohort. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of calcium supplementation in healthy musculoskeletal ageing - An expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis ans Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF)
Harvey, N.C.; Biver, E.; Kaufman, J.-M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017), 28(2), 447-62

Abstract The place of calcium supplementation, with or without concomitant vitamin D supplementation, has been much debated in terms of both efficacy and safety. There have been numerous trials and meta ... [more ▼]

Abstract The place of calcium supplementation, with or without concomitant vitamin D supplementation, has been much debated in terms of both efficacy and safety. There have been numerous trials and meta-analyses of supplementation for fracture reduction, and associations with risk of myocardial infarction have been suggested in recent years. In this report, the product of an expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF), we review the evidence for the value of calcium supplementation, with or without vitamin D supplementation, for healthy musculoskeletal ageing.We conclude that (1) calcium and vitamin D supplementation leads to a modest reduction in fracture risk, although population-level intervention has not been shown to be an effective public health strategy; (2) supplementation with calcium alone for fracture reduction is not supported by the literature; (3) side effects of calcium supplementation include renal stones and gastrointestinal symptoms; (4) vitamin D supplementation, rather than calcium supplementation, may reduce falls risk; and (5) assertions of increased cardiovascular risk consequent to calciumsupplementation are not convincingly supported by current evidence. In conclusion, we recommend, on the basis of the current evidence, that calcium supplementation, with concomitant vitamin D supplementation, is supported for patients at high risk of calcium and vitamin D insufficiency, and in those who are receiving treatment for osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of a giant exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity among nursing home residents: a preliminary study
Mouton, Alexandre ULiege; Gillet, Nicolas; Mouton, Flore et al

in Clinical Interventions in Aging (2017), 12

Purpose: This study examined the effects of a giant (4×3 m) exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA) and a broader array of physical and psychological outcomes among nursing ... [more ▼]

Purpose: This study examined the effects of a giant (4×3 m) exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA) and a broader array of physical and psychological outcomes among nursing home residents. Materials and methods: A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was carried out in two comparable nursing homes. Ten participants (aged 82.5±6.3 and comprising 6 women) meeting the inclusion criteria took part in the 1-month intervention in one nursing home, whereas 11 participants (aged 89.9±3.1 with 8 women) were assigned to the control group in the other nursing home. The giant exercising board game required participants to perform strength, flexibility, balance and endurance activities. The assistance provided by an exercising specialist decreased gradually during the intervention in an autonomy-oriented approach based on the self-determination theory. The following were assessed at baseline, after the intervention and after a follow-up period of 3 months: PA (steps/day and energy expenditure/day with ActiGraph), cognitive status (mini mental state examination), quality of life (EuroQol 5-dimensions), motivation for PA (Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2), gait and balance (Tinetti and Short Physical Performance Battery), functional mobility (timed up and go), and the muscular isometric strength of the lower limb muscles. Results and conclusion: In the intervention group, PA increased from 2,921 steps/day at baseline to 3,358 steps/day after the intervention (+14.9%, P=0.04) and 4,083 steps/day (+39.8%, P=0.03) after 3 months. Energy expenditure/day also increased after the intervention (+110 kcal/day, +6.3%, P=0.01) and after 3 months (+219 kcal/day, +12.3%, P=0.02). Quality of life (P,0.05), balance and gait (P,0.05), and strength of the ankle (P,0.05) were also improved after 3 months. Such improvements were not observed in the control group. The preliminary results are promising but further investigation is required to confirm and evaluate the long-term effectiveness of PA interventions in nursing homes. [less ▲]

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See detailMeeting the Needs of Mothers During the Postpartum Period: Using Co-Creation Workshops to Find Technological Solutions.
Slomian, Justine ULiege; Emonts, Patrick ULiege; Vigneron, Lara ULiege et al

in JMIR Research Protocols (2017), 6(5), 76

BACKGROUND: The postnatal period is associated with many new needs for mothers. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to find technological solutions that meet the needs of mothers during the year ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The postnatal period is associated with many new needs for mothers. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to find technological solutions that meet the needs of mothers during the year following childbirth. METHODS: Two co-creation workshops were undertaken with parents and professionals. The aim of the first workshop was to create a list of all the criteria the proposed solution would have to address to meet the needs of mothers after childbirth. The aim of the second workshop was to create solutions in response to the criteria selected during the first workshop. RESULTS: Parents and health professionals want solutions that include empathy (ie, to help fight against the feelings of abnormality and loneliness), that help mothers in daily life, that are personalized and adapted to different situations, that are educational, and that assures some continuity in their contact with health professionals. In practice, we found that parents and professionals think the solution should be accessible to everyone and available at all times. To address these criteria, technology experts proposed different solutions, such as a forum dedicated to the postpartum period that is supervised by professionals, a centralized website, a system of videoconferencing, an online exchange group, a "gift voucher" system, a virtual reality app, or a companion robot. CONCLUSIONS: The human component seems to be very important during the postnatal period. Nevertheless, technology could be a great ally in helping mothers during the postpartum period. Technology can help reliably inform parents and may also give them the right tools to find supportive people. However, these technologies should be tested in clinical trials. [less ▲]

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See detailEnergy and nutrient content of food served and consumed by nursing home residents
Buckinx, Fanny ULiege; ALLEPAERTS, Sophie ULiege; PAQUOT, Nicolas ULiege et al

in the journal of nutrition, health & aging (2017), 21(6), 727-32

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare energy and protein content of the served food with the actual intake from the food consumed by nursing home residents. This study also aimed to compare food ... [more ▼]

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare energy and protein content of the served food with the actual intake from the food consumed by nursing home residents. This study also aimed to compare food intake and dietary allowances. Design: This is a cross sectional study. Setting: This study was performed in nursing homes. Participants: Residents of these 2 nursing homes were eligible for the study if they agreed to participate and if they meet the selection criteria (to be older than 65 years and have a regular texture diet). Measurement: Nutrient content of the served food and real food consumption was calculated for all meals during a 5-day period by precise weighting method. Difference between consumed and served dietary content was evaluated by the Chi² test. Results: Seventy-four Belgian nursing home residents (75% of women, 85.8 ± 7.04 years on average) were included in this study. These subjects had a mean body mass index of 24.9 ± 4.83 kg/m². The mean energy content of the served food was 1783.3 ± 125.7 kcal per day. However, residents did not eat the whole of the meals and the actual energy content of the consumed food was significantly less (1552.4 ± 342.1 kcal per day; p<.001). The average protein content of the food served was equal to 0.96 ± 0.20 g/kg/day and the average consumption of protein by the residents was 0.88 ± 0.25 g/kg/day. The difference between protein served and consumed was also significant (p=.04). Moreover, people considered as well nourished, eating significantly more energy than the others (p=.04). Conclusion: Meals served in nursing homes are not entirely consumed by their residents. As expected, the energy consumed are lower in subjects considered as malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. [less ▲]

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