References of "Bruyère, Olivier"
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See detailHealth-related quality of life after total knee or hip replacement : a 7-year prospective study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Vanoverberghe, Marie ULg; Neuprez, Audrey ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010, May), 21(Suppl.1), 26

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See detailOral calcitonin in the management of osteoarthritis: hope or fantasy ?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Neuprez, Audrey ULg; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg et al

in International Journal of Clinical Rheumatology (2010), 5(1), 53-58

In the mid-1980s, calcitonin was used as a potential treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, after the results obtained in a pivotal study assessing the antifracture efficacy of the drug ... [more ▼]

In the mid-1980s, calcitonin was used as a potential treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, after the results obtained in a pivotal study assessing the antifracture efficacy of the drug showed an absence of reduction in nonvertebral fractures, calcitonin has almost completely disappeared from the osteoporosis armomentarium. The development of a new ‘high-tech’ oral formulation of salmon calcitonin and the demonstration, in several in vitro and in vivo models of osteoarthritis, that this drug could exert beneficial effects on the chondrocytes and on the development of experimental osteoarthritis has generated some interest in this old molecule. However, at this stage, results from clinical trials remain inconclusive and caution should be exerted before considering oral calcitonin as a breakthrough in the management of osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailVertebral anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate according to pre-treatment bone turnover.
Collette, Julien ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kaufman, J. M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010), 21(2), 233-41

Osteoporotic post-menopausal women patients in two randomised trials comparing the anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate with placebo were separated into tertiles according to their baseline levels ... [more ▼]

Osteoporotic post-menopausal women patients in two randomised trials comparing the anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate with placebo were separated into tertiles according to their baseline levels of biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption. The vertebral anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate was shown to be independent of baseline bone turnover levels. INTRODUCTION: Bone turnover (BTO) levels vary among women at risk of osteoporotic fracture. Strontium ranelate is an anti-osteoporotic treatment increasing bone formation and reducing bone resorption. It was hypothesised that its anti-fracture efficacy would be independent of baseline BTO levels. METHODS: Post-menopausal women with osteoporosis from two pooled studies were stratified in tertiles according to baseline levels of two BTO markers: bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (b-ALP, n = 4995) and serum C-telopeptide cross-links (sCTX, n = 4891). Vertebral fracture risk was assessed over 3 years with strontium ranelate 2 g/day or placebo. RESULTS: In the placebo group, relative risk of vertebral fractures increased with BTO tertiles by 32% and 24% for patients in the highest tertile for b-ALP and CTX, respectively, compared to those in the lowest tertile. In the strontium ranelate group, incidences of vertebral fracture did not differ significantly across BTO tertiles. Significant reductions in vertebral fractures with strontium ranelate were seen in all tertiles of both markers, with relative risk reductions of 31% to 47% relative to placebo. Risk reduction did not differ among tertiles (b-ALP: p = 0.513; sCTX: p = 0.290). CONCLUSION: The vertebral anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate was independent of baseline BTO levels. Strontium ranelate offers clinical benefits to women across a wide range of metabolic states. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine sulphate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: cost-effectiveness comparison with paracetamol.
Scholtissen, S.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Neuprez, A. et al

in International Journal of Clinical Practice (2010), 64(6), 756-62

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to explore the cost-effectiveness of glucosamine sulphate (GS) compared with paracetamol and placebo (PBO) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. For this purpose ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to explore the cost-effectiveness of glucosamine sulphate (GS) compared with paracetamol and placebo (PBO) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. For this purpose, a 6-month time horizon and a health care perspective was used. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The cost and effectiveness data were derived from Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index data of the Glucosamine Unum In Die (once-a-day) Efficacy trial study by Herrero-Beaumont et al. Clinical effectiveness was converted into utility scores to allow for the computation of cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) For the three treatment arms Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio were calculated and statistical uncertainty was explored using a bootstrap simulation. RESULTS: In terms of mean utility score at baseline, 3 and 6 months, no statistically significant difference was observed between the three groups. When considering the mean utility score changes from baseline to 3 and 6 months, no difference was observed in the first case but there was a statistically significant difference from baseline to 6 months with a p-value of 0.047. When comparing GS with paracetamol, the mean baseline incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was dominant and the mean ICER after bootstrapping was -1376 euro/QALY indicating dominance (with 79% probability). When comparing GS with PBO, the mean baseline and after bootstrapping ICER were 3617.47 and 4285 euro/QALY, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of the present cost-effectiveness analysis suggested that GS is a highly cost-effective therapy alternative compared with paracetamol and PBO to treat patients diagnosed with primary knee OA. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between 3-month changes in biochemical markers of bone remodelling and changes in bone mineral density and fracture incidence in patients treated with strontium ranelate for 3 years.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Collette, Julien ULg; Rizzoli, R. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010), 21

From two randomised controlled trials, it is shown that 3-month changes in biochemical markers of bone formation (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and C-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen) were ... [more ▼]

From two randomised controlled trials, it is shown that 3-month changes in biochemical markers of bone formation (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and C-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen) were associated with 3-year bone mineral density (BMD) changes, but not fracture incidence in patients treated with strontium ranelate. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to assess if short-term change in biochemical markers of bone remodelling is associated with long-term BMD change and fracture incidence observed during treatment with strontium ranelate. METHODS: From the SOTI and TROPOS trials, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), C-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), serum C-terminal telopeptides (S-CTX) and urine N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (U-NTX) were assessed at baseline and after 3 months. RESULTS: Two thousand three hundred seventy-three women were included in this study. Multiple regression analysis showed that 3-month changes in PICP and BALP but not s-CTX I nor s-NTX I were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with 3-year BMD changes at the lumbar spine and the femoral neck. Changes in s-CTX I, PICP and BALP were significantly associated with change in total proximal femur BMD. Changes in biochemical markers explain less than 8% of the BMD changes. The 3-month changes in BALP, PICP s-CTX I and s-NTX I were not significantly associated with fracture incidence. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term changes in biochemical markers of bone formation are associated with future BMD changes in patients treated with strontium ranelate, suggesting a bone-forming activity of this treatment, but are not appropriate to monitor the efficacy of strontium ranelate at the individual level. [less ▲]

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See detailThe need for a transparent, ethical, and successful relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry: a view of the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES).
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kanis, J. A.; Ibar-Abadie, M*-E et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010), 21(5), 713-22

This paper provides recommendations for fair and unbiased relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry. INTRODUCTION: Real or perceived problems in the relationship between ... [more ▼]

This paper provides recommendations for fair and unbiased relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry. INTRODUCTION: Real or perceived problems in the relationship between academics and the industry have been the subject of much recent debate. It has been suggested that academic clinicians should sever all links with the industry-a view that is rarely challenged. METHODS: Academic experts and members of the pharmaceutical industry were invited to an expert consensus meeting to debate this topic. This meeting was organized by the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science. Conflict of interest, competing interest, right and duties of academic scientist, authorship, and staff and student education were discussed. RESULTS: Guidelines for a transparent, ethical, strong, and successful partnership between the academic scientist and the pharmaceutical industry have been provided. CONCLUSIONS: The Group support interactions between the industry and clinicians provided that it is transparent and ethical. [less ▲]

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See detailCost-utility of long-term strontium ranelate treatment for postmenopausal osteoporotic women.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2010), 21

The results of this study suggested that long-term treatment with strontium ranelate over 5 years is cost-effective compared to no treatment for postmenopausal osteoporotic women. INTRODUCTION: This study ... [more ▼]

The results of this study suggested that long-term treatment with strontium ranelate over 5 years is cost-effective compared to no treatment for postmenopausal osteoporotic women. INTRODUCTION: This study aims to estimate the cost-effectiveness of long-term strontium ranelate treatment for postmenopausal osteoporotic women. METHODS: A validated Markov microsimulation model with a Belgian healthcare cost perspective was used to assess the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) of strontium ranelate compared to no treatment, on a basis of calcium/vit D supplementation if needed. Analyses were performed for women aged 70, 75, and 80 years either with a bone mineral density T-score </= -2.5 SD or with prevalent vertebral fractures. The relative risk of fracture during therapy was derived from the Treatment of Peripheral Osteoporosis Study trial over 5 years of treatment. Parameter uncertainty was evaluated using both univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. RESULTS: Strontium ranelate was cost-saving at the age of 80 years in both populations. For women with a T-score </= -2.5 SD, the costs per QALY gained of strontium ranelate were respectively <euro>15,096 and <euro>6,913 at 70 and 75 years of age while these values were <euro>23,426 and <euro>9,698 for women with prevalent vertebral fractures. Sensitivity analyses showed that the results were robust over a wide range of assumptions. CONCLUSION: This study suggested that, compared to no treatment, long-term strontium ranelate treatment is cost-effective for postmenopausal osteoporotic women. [less ▲]

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See detailCost-effectiveness of strontium ranelate versus risedronate in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporotic women aged over 75 years.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Bone (2010), 46(2), 440-6

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of strontium ranelate in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporotic women aged over 75 years. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A validated Markov microsimulation ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of strontium ranelate in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporotic women aged over 75 years. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A validated Markov microsimulation model with a Belgian payer's perspective estimated the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) of a 3-year strontium ranelate treatment compared with no treatment and with the bisphosphonate risedronate. Data on the effect of both treatments on fracture risk were taken from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Analyses were performed for postmenopausal women aged 75 and 80 years, either with a diagnosis of osteoporosis (i.e. bone mineral density T-score </=-2.5 SD) or with prevalent vertebral fractures (PVF). Parameter uncertainty was evaluated using both one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. RESULTS: Strontium ranelate was dominant (i.e. more effective and less costly) versus risedronate for women with osteoporosis aged over 75 years and for women with PVF aged 80 years. The cost per QALY gained of strontium ranelate compared with risedronate at 75 years of age was euro11,435 for women with PVF. When compared with no treatment, the costs per QALY gained of strontium ranelate were euro15,588 and euro7,708 at 75 and 80 years of age for women with osteoporosis; the equivalent values were euro16,518 and euro6,015 for women with PVF. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses showed that strontium ranelate was generally more cost-effective than risedronate, in the range of 60% in all cases. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that strontium ranelate is a cost-effective strategy, in a Belgian setting, for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporotic women aged over 75 years. [less ▲]

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See detailCost-Effectiveness of Osteoporosis Screening Followed by Treatment: The Impact of Medication Adherence.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Gathon, Henry-Jean ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Value in Health (2010), 13(4), 394-401

ABSTRACT Objective: To estimate the impact of medication adherence on the cost-effectiveness of mass-screening by bone densitometry followed by alendronate therapy for women diagnosed with osteoporosis ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT Objective: To estimate the impact of medication adherence on the cost-effectiveness of mass-screening by bone densitometry followed by alendronate therapy for women diagnosed with osteoporosis. Methods: A validated Markov microsimulation model with a Belgian health-care payer perspective and a lifetime horizon was used to assess the cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained of the screening/treatment strategy compared with no intervention. Real-world adherence to alendronate therapy and full adherence over 5 years were both investigated. The real-world adherence scenario employed adherence data from published observational studies, and medication adherence was divided into persistence, compliance, and primary adherence. Uncertainty was investigated using one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results: At 65 years of age, the costs per QALY gained because of the screening/treatment strategy versus no intervention are euro32,008 and euro16,918 in the real-world adherence and full adherence scenarios, respectively. The equivalent values are euro80,836 and euro40,462 at the age of 55 years, and they decrease to euro10,600 and euro1229 at the age of 75 years. Sensitivity analyses show that the presence of the upfront cost of case finding has a substantial role in the impact of medication adherence on cost-effectiveness. Conclusion: This study indicates that nonadherence with osteoporosis medications substantially increases the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of osteoporosis screening strategies. All aspects of medication adherence (i.e., compliance, persistence, and primary adherence) should therefore be reported and included in pharmacoeconomic analyses, and especially in the presence of the upfront cost of case finding (such as screening cost). [less ▲]

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See detailRehabilitation in osteoporotic subjects - Myth or reality?
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in European Musculoskeletal Review (2010), 5(1), 36-39

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See detailThe clinical and economic burden of non-adherence with oral bisphosphonates in osteoporotic patients.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Health Policy (2010), 96

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to estimate the clinical and economic burden of non-adherence with oral bisphosphonates in osteoporotic patients and the potential cost-effectiveness of adherence-enhancing ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to estimate the clinical and economic burden of non-adherence with oral bisphosphonates in osteoporotic patients and the potential cost-effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions. METHODS: A validated Markov microsimulation model estimated costs and outcomes (i.e. the number of fractures and the quality-adjusted life-year (QALY)) for three adherence scenarios: no treatment, real-world adherence and full adherence over 3 years. The real-world adherence scenario employed data from a published observational study. The incremental cost per QALY gained was estimated and compared across the three adherence scenarios. RESULTS: The number of fractures prevented and the QALY gain obtained at real-world adherence levels represented only 38.2% and 40.7% of those expected with full adherence, respectively. The cost per QALY gained of real-world adherence compared with no treatment was estimated at euro10279, and full adherence was found to be cost-saving compared with real-world adherence. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that more than half of the potential clinical benefits from oral bisphosphonates in patients with osteoporosis are lost due to poor adherence with treatment. Depending on their cost, interventions with improved adherence to therapy have the potential to be an attractive use of resources. [less ▲]

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See detailCost-effectiveness of strontium ranelate for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Vanoverberghe, Marie ULg; Neuprez, Audrey ULg et al

in Expert Review of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research (2010), 10(4), 359-366

Strontium ranelate has recently been introduced for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in Europe and in many countries worldwide. This study aims to review the published cost-effectiveness ... [more ▼]

Strontium ranelate has recently been introduced for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in Europe and in many countries worldwide. This study aims to review the published cost-effectiveness literature pertaining to strontium ranelate. Six studies were identified: two in United Kingdom, two in Belgium and two in Sweden. The findings were consistent across the literature, suggesting that strontium ranelate is a cost-saving drug for women with osteoporosis aged over 80 years of age, and it is a cost-effective treatment compared with no treatment for osteoporotic women aged over 70 years and for younger women with clinical risk factors for fragility fracture. Strontium ranelate was also shown to be cost-effective compared with branded risedronate in osteoporotic women over 75 years. Further analyses are required to assess effectiveness and adherence to strontium ranelate in real-life settings, as well as to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of strontium ranelate in other countries and in populations of men. [less ▲]

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See detailRehabilitation in osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Therapy (2010), 7(6), 669-674

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See detailLarge review finds no clinically important effect of glucosamine or chondroitin on pain in people with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip but results are questionable and likely due to heterogeneity
Bruyère, Olivier ULg

in Evidence-Based Medicine (2010)

Context Treatment of osteoarthritis with unspecifi c symptomatic agents is not satisfactory and burdened with safety issues. The use of glucosamine and/or chondroitin as diseasemodifying agents is ... [more ▼]

Context Treatment of osteoarthritis with unspecifi c symptomatic agents is not satisfactory and burdened with safety issues. The use of glucosamine and/or chondroitin as diseasemodifying agents is increasingly popular, despite conflicting clinical trial evidence with the many available products. Wandel and colleagues produced a systematic review and a meta-analysis with relatively new statistical methods. [less ▲]

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