References of "Bruyère, Olivier"
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See detailEffets symptomatiques de la glucosamine dans l’arthrose
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg

in Pharma-Sphère (2006), 110

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See detailQualité des travaux de fin d'études
Bruyère, Olivier ULg

Conference (2005, December 06)

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See detailThree year joint space narrowing predicts long term incidence of knee surgery in patients with osteoarthritis: an eight year prospective follow up study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Richy, F.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2005), 64(12), 1727-1730

OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical relevance of mean and minimum femorotibial joint space narrowing (JSN) for predicting future osteoarthritis related surgery in patients with knee osteoarthritis. METHODS ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical relevance of mean and minimum femorotibial joint space narrowing (JSN) for predicting future osteoarthritis related surgery in patients with knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: 126 subjects with primary knee osteoarthritis were followed prospectively for a mean eight years. Minimum and mean joint space width (JSW) were assessed from standard x rays at baseline and after a follow up of three years. The rate of knee osteoarthritis related surgery was recorded for the following five years. RESULTS: After a mean follow up of eight years, 16 patients (12.7%) had received osteoarthritis related joint surgery. The areas under the curves (AUC) resulting from the receiver operating characteristic curve analyses for predicting osteoarthritis surgery were 0.73 (p=0.006) for minimum JSN and 0.55 (p=0.54) for mean JSN. The cut off for minimum JSN maximising sensitivity and specificity for predicting future surgery was a change of 0.7 mm or more in minimum joint space width over a period of three years. However, no meaningful differences were observed for cut off values between 0.5 and 0.8 mm The relative risk (adjusted for age, body mass index, baseline symptoms, and baseline JSW) of experiencing osteoarthritis related surgery during the eight year of follow up was 5.15 (95% confidence interval, 1.70 to 15.60) (p=0.004) in patients with a minimum joint space narrowing of 0.7 mm or more during the first three years of the study. CONCLUSIONS: A cut off of 0.5 to 0.8 mm in minimum JSN, measured on standard x rays, reflects a clinically relevant progression in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-reported versus measured prevalence of osteoporosis. An age-stratified analysis of its diagnostic coverage
Richy, Florent; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Maassen, Philippe et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2005, September), 52(number 9 (suppl.)), 228-229

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See detailMagnetic Resonance Imaging and biochemical markers of osteoarthritis of the knee
Kothari, Manish; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; COLLETTE, Julien ULg et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2005, September), 52(number 9 (suppl.)), 71

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See detailLongitudinal study of magnetic resonance imaging and fixed-flexion radiography to assess progression of osteoarthritis of the knee
Kothari, Manish; Peterfy, Charles; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2005, September), 52(number 9 (suppl.)), 65

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See detailStrontium Ranelate (Fujisawa/Servier)
Jupsin, Isabelle ULg; Collette, Julien ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg et al

in Current Opinion in Investigational Drugs (London, England : 2000) (2005), 6(4), 435-44

Strontium ranelate (PROTELOS), a divalent strontium salt, has been developed and launched by Servier for the treatment of osteoporosis. Fujisawa Pharmaceutical is developing the drug in Japan; in November ... [more ▼]

Strontium ranelate (PROTELOS), a divalent strontium salt, has been developed and launched by Servier for the treatment of osteoporosis. Fujisawa Pharmaceutical is developing the drug in Japan; in November 2004, phase II Japanese trials were ongoing. [less ▲]

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See detailTotal joint replacement of hip or knee as an outcome measure for structure modifying trials in osteoarthritis
Altman, R. D.; Abadie, Eric ULg; Avouac, B. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 10

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See detailScreening for osteoporosis: systematic DXA or pre-screening with questionnaires? An economic point of view
Richy, Florent; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 101

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See detailResponders to glucosamine sulfate in knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Pavelka, K.; Richy, Florent et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 77

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See detailA critical analysis of the efficacy of estrogens on spinal and non-spinal fracture reduction
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Richy, Florent; Bruyère, Olivier ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 47

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See detailOne-year progression of knee osteoarthritis: correlations between X-Rays and magnetic resonance imaging changes
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 46-47

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See detailFemoro-tibial joint space width, assessed by standard X-Ray, is associated with tibial cartilage volume and thickness, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 46

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See detailAn indirect comparison of the efficacies of vitamin D and its hydroxylated analogs in postmenopausal and corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis
Richy, Florent; Schacht, E.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 29

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See detailKnee whole-organ MRI score (WORMS) as a surrogate marker for X-ray joint space narrowing
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 6

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See detailVitamin D analogs versus native vitamin D in preventing bone loss and osteoporosis-related fractures: A comparative meta-analysis
Richy, F.; Schacht, E.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2005), 76(3), 176-186

It has been suggested that early postmenopausal women and patients treated with steroids should receive preventive therapy (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin D analogs, estrogens, or bisphosphonates) to ... [more ▼]

It has been suggested that early postmenopausal women and patients treated with steroids should receive preventive therapy (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin D analogs, estrogens, or bisphosphonates) to preserve their bone mineral density (BMD) and to avoid fragility fractures. We designed the present study to compare the effects of native vitamin D to its hydroxylated analogs alfacalcidol 1-alpha(OH)D and calcitriol 1,25(OH)(2)D. All randomized, controlled, double-blinded trials comparing oral native vitamin D and its analogs, alfacalcidol or calcitriol, to placebo or head-to-head trials in primary or corticosteroids-induced osteoporosis were included in the meta-analysis. Sources included the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and a hand search of abstracts and references lists. The study period January 1985 to January 2003. Data were abstracted by two investigators, and methodological quality was assessed in a similar manner. Heterogeneity was extensively investigated. Results were expressed as effect-size (ES) for bone loss and as rate difference (RD) for fracture while allocated to active treatment or control. Publication bias was investigated. Fourteen studies of native vitamin D, nine of alfacalcidol, and ten of calcitriol fit the inclusion criteria. The two vitamin D analogs appeared to exert a higher preventive effect on bone loss and fracture rates in patients not exposed to glucocorticoids. With respect to BMD, vitamin D analogs versus placebo studies had an ES of 0.36 (P < 0.0001), whereas native vitamin D versus placebo had an ES of 0.17 (P = 0.0005), the interclass difference being highly significant (ANOVA-1, P < 0.05). When restricted to the lumbar spine, this intertreatment difference remained significant: ES = 0.43 (P = 0.0002) for vitamin D analogs and ES = 0.21 (P = 0.001) for native vitamin D (analysis of variance [ANOVA-1], P = 0.047). There were no significant differences regarding their efficacies on other measurement sites (ANOVA-1, P = 0.36). When comparing the adjusted global relative risks for fracture when allocated to vitamin D analogs or native vitamin D, alfacalcidol and calcitriol provided a more marked preventive efficacy against fractures: RD = 10% (95% Confidence interval [CI-2] to 17) compared to RD = 2% (95% CI, 1 to 2), respectively. The analysis of the spinal and nonspinal showed that fracture rates differed between the two classes, thereby confirming the benefits of vitamin D analogs, with significant 13.4% (95% CI 7.7 to 19.8) and. 6% (95% CI 1 to 12) lower fracture rates for vitamin D analogs, respectively. In patients receiving corticosteroid therapy, both treatments provided similar global ESs for BMD: ES = 0.38 for vitamin D analogs and ES = 0.41 for native vitamin D (ANOVA-1, P = 0.88). When restriced to spinal BMD, D analogs provided significant effects, whereas native vitamin D did not: ES = 0.43 (P < 0.0001) and ES = 0.33 (P = 0.21), respectively. The intertreatment difference was nonsignificant (ANOVA-1, P = 0.52). Neither D analogs for native vitamin D significantly prevented fractures in this subcategory of patients: RD = 2.6 (95%CI, -9.5 to 4.3) and RD = 6.4 (95%CI, -2.3 to 10), respectively. In head-to-head studies comparing D analogs and native vitamin D in patients receiving corticosteroids, significant effects favoring D analogs were found for femoral neck BMD: ES = 0.31 at P = 0.02 and spinal fractures: RD = 15% (95%CI, 6.5 to 25). Publication bias was not significant. Our analysis demonstrates a superiority of the D analogs atfacalcidol and calcitriol in preventing bone loss and spinal fractures in primary osteoporosis, including postmenopausal women. In corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, the efficacy of D analogs differed depending on the comparative approach: indirect comparisons led to nonsignificant differences, whereas direct comparison did provide significant differences. In this setting, D analogs seem to prevent spinal fractures to a greater extent than do native vitamin D, but this assumption should be confirmed on a comprehensive basis in multiarm studies including an inactive comparator. [less ▲]

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