References of "Bruyère, Olivier"
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See detailCurrent role of glucosamine in the treatment of osteoarthritis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Neuprez, Audrey

in Rheumatology (2007), 46(5), 731-735

Objectives. To evaluate the interest of using the various preparations of glucosamine for symptomatic and structural management of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. A critical analysis of the literature based ... [more ▼]

Objectives. To evaluate the interest of using the various preparations of glucosamine for symptomatic and structural management of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. A critical analysis of the literature based on an exhaustive search (Medline, PubMed and manual search within the bibliography of retrieved manuscripts) from 1980 to 2005. Results. Despite multiple controlled clinical trials of the use of glucosamine in OA (mainly of the knee), controversy on efficacy related to symptomatic improvement continues. Differences in results originate from the differences in products, study design and study populations. Symptomatic efficacy described in multiple studies performed with glucosamine sulphate (GS) support continued consideration in the OA therapeutic armamentarium. The most compelling evidence of a potential for inhibiting the progression of OA is also obtain with GS. Conclusions. GS has shown positive effects on symptomatic and structural outcomes of knee OA. These results should not be extrapolated to other glucosamine salts [hydrochloride or preparations (over-the-counter or food supplements)] in which no warranty exists about content, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the tablets. [less ▲]

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See detailVitamin D inadequacy in Belgian postmenopausal osteoporotic women.
Neuprez, Audrey ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Collette, Julien ULg et al

in BMC Public Health (2007), 7(147), 64

BACKGROUND: Inadequate serum vitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations are associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism, increased bone turnover and bone loss, which increase fracture risk. The objective of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Inadequate serum vitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations are associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism, increased bone turnover and bone loss, which increase fracture risk. The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of inadequate serum 25(OH)D concentrations in postmenopausal Belgian women. Opinions with regard to the definition of vitamin D deficiency and adequate vitamin D status vary widely and there are no clear international agreements on what constitute adequate concentrations of vitamin D. METHODS: Assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and parathyroid hormone was performed in 1195 Belgian postmenopausal women aged over 50 years. Main analysis has been performed in the whole study population and according to the previous use of vitamin D and calcium supplements. Four cut-offs of 25(OH)D inadequacy were fixed : < 80 nmol/L, <75 nmol/L, < 50 nmol/L and < 30 nmol/L. RESULTS: Mean (SD) age of the patients was 76.9 (7.5) years, body mass index was 25.7 (4.5) kg/m2. Concentrations of 25(OH)D were 52.5 (21.4) nmol/L. In the whole study population, the prevalence of 25(OH)D inadequacy was 91.3 %, 87.5 %, 43.1 % and 15.9% when considering cut-offs of 80, 75, 50 and 30 nmol/L, respectively. Women who used vitamin D supplements, alone or combined with calcium supplements, had higher concentrations of 25(OH)D than non-users. Significant inverse correlations were found between age/serum PTH and serum 25(OH)D (r = -0.23/r = -0.31) and also between age/serum PTH and femoral neck BMD (r = -0.29/r = -0.15). There is a significant positive relation between age and PTH (r = 0.16), serum 25(OH)D and femoral neck BMD (r = 0.07). (P < 0.05)Vitamin D concentrations varied with the season of sampling but did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.09). CONCLUSION: This study points out a high prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy in Belgian postmenopausal osteoporotic women, even among subjects receiving vitamin D supplements. [less ▲]

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See detailPinning down pain: acupuncture offers pain relief for osteoarthritis patients
Bruyère, Olivier ULg

E-print/Working paper (2007)

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See detailRationale and development of an individual patient-based model to accurately assess the efficacy of osteoporosis management
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Richy, Florent; Ethgen, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2007, March), 18(S1), 169

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See detailTotal joint replacement after glucosamine sulfate treatment of knee osteoarthritis: results from a 8-year prospective cohort
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Pavelka, K.; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2007, March), 18(Suppl.1), 81

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See detailCalcium daily food intake is very low in European postmenopausal women
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; De Cock, Caroline; Neuprez, Audrey ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2007, March), 18(Suppl.1), 125

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See detailPrevalence of vitamin D inadequacy is high in European postmenopausal women
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Malaise, Olivier; Neuprez, Audrey ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2007, March), 18(Suppl.1), 124

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See detailStrontium ranelate prevents spine osteoarthritis progression in patients with prevalent spinal osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delferriere, Danielle; Roux, Christian et al

in Osteoporosis International (2007, March), 18(Suppl1), 16-17

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See detailStrontium ranelate decreases vertebral fracture risk whatever the level of pretreatment bone turnover markers
Collette, Julien ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2007, March), 18(Suppl.1), 127-128

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See detailVitamin D inadequacy in Belgian postmenopausal women
Neuprez, Audrey ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2007, March), 18(Suppl.1), 123

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See detailStrontium ranelate in the prevention of osteoporotic fractures
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Malaise, Olivier ULg; Neuprez, Audrey et al

in International Journal of Clinical Practice (2007), 61(2), 324-328

Osteoporosis results from a decrease in bone strength yielding increased susceptibility to fractures. Hip and spine fractures are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. With ... [more ▼]

Osteoporosis results from a decrease in bone strength yielding increased susceptibility to fractures. Hip and spine fractures are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. With an increasingly ageing world population, early prevention of bone loss is essential for adequate control of this condition. Strontium ranelate (PROTELOS (R)), an oral drug for postmenopausal osteoporosis, has been reported to decrease bone resorption and to stimulate bone formation. The efficacy in reducing vertebral fractures, non-vertebral including hip fractures, and the safety of strontium ranelate has been initially demonstrated over 3 years in the SOTI (Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention) and TROPOS (TReatment Of Peripheral OSteoporosis) studies and confirmed recently over up to 5 years. A preplanned analysis of a sub-group of patients aged 80 years and over showed that, currently, strontium ranelate is the only antiosteoporotic agent to reduce vertebral and non-vertebral fractures in this age group. [less ▲]

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See detailLongitudinal study of magnetic resonance imaging and standard X-rays to assess disease progression in osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Genant, H.; Kothari, M. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2007), 15(1), 98-103

Objective: To investigate, over 1-year, the relationship between X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Sixty-two osteoarthritic patients ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate, over 1-year, the relationship between X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Sixty-two osteoarthritic patients (46 women) were followed for 1 year. At baseline and after 1 year, volume and thickness of cartilage of the medial tibia, the lateral tibia and the femur were assessed by MRI. A global score from the multi-feature whole-organ MRI scoring system (WORMS) was calculated for each patient at baseline and after 1 year. This score combined individual scores for articular cartilage, osteophytes, bone marrow abnormality, subchondral cysts and bone attrition in 14 locations. It also incorporated scores for the medial and lateral menisci, anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, medial and lateral collateral ligaments and synovial distension. Lateral and medial femorotibial joint space width (JSW) measurements, performed by digital image analysis, were assessed from fixed-flexion, postero-anterior knee radiographs. Results: One-year changes in medial femoro-tibial JSW reach 6.7 (20.5) % and changes in medial cartilage volume and thickness reach 0.4 (16.7) % and 2.1 (11.3) %, respectively. Medial femoro-tibial joint space narrowing (JSN) after 1 year, assessed by radiography, was significantly correlated with a loss of medial tibial cartilage volume (r = 0.25, P = 0.046) and medial tibial cartilage thickness (r = 0.28, P = 0.025), over the same period. We found also a significant correlation between the progression of the WORMS and radiographic medial JSN over 1 year (r = -0.35, P = 0.006). All these results remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, sex and body mass index. Conclusion: This study shows a moderate but significant association between changes in JSW and changes in cartilage volume or thickness in knee joint of osteoarthritic patients. (C) 2006 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailInjectable bisphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Burlet, Nansa; Close, P. et al

in Women's Health (2007), 3(6), 719-23

Bisphosphonates are the current mainstay of the management of osteoporosis worldwide. Oral daily and weekly formulations have been linked to poor adherence, yielding a decrease in antifracture efficacy ... [more ▼]

Bisphosphonates are the current mainstay of the management of osteoporosis worldwide. Oral daily and weekly formulations have been linked to poor adherence, yielding a decrease in antifracture efficacy, in real-life settings. Development of new bisphosphonates, with increased antiosteoclastic potency and affinity for bone matrix allowed intravenous administration and intervals between dosings to be higher than weekly. Ibandronate and zoledronic acid have been investigated in established osteoporosis. Quarterly injections of ibandronate (3 mg) have been shown to be at least as effective in increasing bone mineral density and reducing bone turnover markers as the oral ibandronate regimen, which has proven antifracture efficacy. A once-yearly infusion of zoledronic acid (5 mg) during a 3-year period significantly reduced the risk of vertebral, hip and other fractures. Intravenous administration of bisphosphonates can now be considered as an important component of the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine and chondroitin sulfate as therapeutic agents for knee and hip Osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Drugs & Aging (2007), 24(7), 573-580

Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a public health problem throughout the world. Several entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a public health problem throughout the world. Several entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of OA. This review evaluates published studies of the effect of glucosamine salts and chondroitin sulfate preparations on the progression of knee or hip OA. Despite multiple double-blind, controlled clinical trials of the use of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate in OA, controversy regarding the efficacy of these agents with respect to symptomatic improvement remains. Several potential confounders, including placebo response, use of prescription medicines versus over-the-counter pills or food supplements, or use of glucosamine sulfate versus glucosamine hydrochloride, may have relevance when attempting to interpret the seemingly contradictory results of different clinical trials. The National Institutes of Health-sponsored GAIT (Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial) compared placebo, glucosamine hydrochloride, chondroitin sulfate, a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate and celecoxib in a parallel, blinded 6-month multicentre study of patients with knee OA. This trial showed that glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate alone or in combination did not reduce pain effectively in the overall group of patients with OA of the knee. However, exploratory analyses suggest that the combination of glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate may be effective in the subgroup of patients with moderate-to-severe knee pain. For decades, the traditional pharmacological management of OA has been mainly symptomatic. However, in recent years, several randomised controlled studies have assessed the structure-modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate using plain radiography to measure joint space narrowing over years. There is some evidence to suggest a structure-modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. On the basis of the results of recent randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses, we can conclude that glucosamine sulfate (but not glucosamine hydrochloride) and chondroitin sulfate have small-to-moderate symptomatic efficacy in OA, although this is still debated. With respect to the structure-modifying effect, there is compelling evidence that glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate may interfere with progression of OA. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevention of hip fractures in osteoporosis
Neuprez, Audrey ULg; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Minerva Ortopedica e Traumatologica (2007), 58(5), 423-437

Hip fracture is the major clinical consequence of osteoporosis. It is linked with decreased life expectancy and quality of life, placing an ever increasing burden on health services. Few medications have ... [more ▼]

Hip fracture is the major clinical consequence of osteoporosis. It is linked with decreased life expectancy and quality of life, placing an ever increasing burden on health services. Few medications have unequivocally demonstrated their ability to reduce hip fracture risk in osteoporotic subjects. Daily alendronate and risedronate reduce hip fracture in patients with low bone mineral density and prevalent vertebral fractures. Intravenous bisphosphonates have been developed, in response to long-term poor adherence to oral anti-osteoporotic treatments. Once-yearly zoledronic acid reduces fracture rates at the spine, non-spine and hip locations. Strontium ranelate, the first drug to uncouple bone formation from bone resorption has also demonstrated its ability to reduce hip fractures in patients above 74 years old, with prevalent low bone mineral density. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation are prerequisite for the management of elderly subjects and should always been associated to anti-resorptive or bone forming agents. Non-pharmacological management of osteoporosis is recommended cannot be considered a substitute for pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis, not even in old age. [less ▲]

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See detailIntraveinous paracetamol: a review of efficacy and safety in therapeutic use
Malaise, Olivier ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Future Neurology (2007), 2(6), 673-688

Paracetamol is well established as a leading nonprescription antipyretic analgesic drug and is available in oral, rectal or intravenous forms. However, except for oral paracetamol, there is a marked ... [more ▼]

Paracetamol is well established as a leading nonprescription antipyretic analgesic drug and is available in oral, rectal or intravenous forms. However, except for oral paracetamol, there is a marked discrepancy between the extent to which paracetamol is used and the available evidence for an analgesic effect in postoperative pain. This review mainly focuses on intravenous paracetamol. Its efficacy and safety are analyzed, as well as its use in therapeutics, alone or in combination. The morphine-sparing, additive and antihyperalgesia effects of intravenous paracetamol are also reviewed. The analyses are divided into several sections, comparing the efficacy of intravenous paracetamol with placebo, other forms of paracetamol or analgesic agents and analyzing its efficacy in multimodal therapy combined with NSAIDs or a morphinic agent. [less ▲]

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See detailEpidémiologie de l'environnement
Bruyère, Olivier ULg

Learning material (2007)

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See detailStructure modification in osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in European Musculoskeletal Review (2007)

For decades, the traditional pharmacological management of osteoarthritis (OA) has been mainly symptomatic, despite a lack of evidence of its influence on the duration of the disease and its progression ... [more ▼]

For decades, the traditional pharmacological management of osteoarthritis (OA) has been mainly symptomatic, despite a lack of evidence of its influence on the duration of the disease and its progression. However, in recent years several sets of guidelines, recommendations or points to consider have been issued by regulatory authorities or scientific groups regarding requirements for the registration of drugs to be used in the treatment of OA. The ideal outcomes currently include pain and function assessment for symptom-modifying drugs, and joint-space narrowing (JSN) assessed by plain radiography for structure-modifying compounds. Taking advantage of these more precise recommendations, several chemical entities have been carefully investigated for the management of OA. This article provides a summary of the available evidence demonstrating that some compounds can effectively interfere with the structural progression of the disease. Avocado/Soybean Unsaponifiables The unsaponifiable part of avocado (A) and soybean (S) oils (ASU) mixed in a ratio of 1:2 (A1:S2) has been investigated in the treatment of connective tissues, including in OA, for several years. A pilot randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with follow-up over two years failed to demonstrate a structural effect of ASU in 163 patients with painful hip OA.1 However, in a post hoc analysis a significant difference was detected in the subgroup with a baseline joint-space width (JSW) smaller than 2.45mm: joint space loss was halved in the treated group (-0.43±0.51mm) compared with the placebo group (-0.86±0.62mm; p=0.01). This finding suggests that ASU may have a structure-modifying effect in patients with severe hip OA. Chondroitine Sulphate Chondroitine sulphate (CS) is a major component of the extra-cellular matrix from many connective tissues, including – but not limited to – cartilage, bone, skin, ligaments and tendons. In the articular cartilage, the high content of CS in the aggrecan plays a major role in creating considerable osmotic swelling pressure, which expands the matrix and places the collagen network under tension. In a pilot double-blind study, JSW measurement on digitalised radiographs of the extended knees was used to compare the effects of CS 800mg/day and a placebo in patients with knee OA.2 There were 23 patients in each group. After one year, JSW was unchanged in the treated group but had decreased by 0.4mm in the placebo group (p<0.005). No significant difference was found for JSW at the narrowest site. The small number of patients for whom end-point values were available (12 in the placebo group and 14 in the CS group) limits the relevance of the results. Another study randomised a total of 120 patients with symptomatic knee OA into two groups receiving either 800mg CS or placebo per day for two periods of three months during one year.3 Radiological progression was assessed as a secondary outcome by automatic measurement of medial femoro-tibial JSW on weight-bearing X-rays of both knees. Radiological progression at month 12 showed significantly decreased JSW in the placebo group, with no change in the CS group. [less ▲]

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