References of "Bruyère, Olivier"
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See detailScreening for osteoporosis: systematic DXA or pre-screening with questionnaires? An economic point of view
Richy, Florent; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 101

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See detailResponders to glucosamine sulfate in knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Pavelka, K.; Richy, Florent et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 77

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See detailA critical analysis of the efficacy of estrogens on spinal and non-spinal fracture reduction
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Richy, Florent; Bruyère, Olivier ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 47

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See detailOne-year progression of knee osteoarthritis: correlations between X-Rays and magnetic resonance imaging changes
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 46-47

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See detailFemoro-tibial joint space width, assessed by standard X-Ray, is associated with tibial cartilage volume and thickness, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 46

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See detailAn indirect comparison of the efficacies of vitamin D and its hydroxylated analogs in postmenopausal and corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis
Richy, Florent; Schacht, E.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 29

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See detailKnee whole-organ MRI score (WORMS) as a surrogate marker for X-ray joint space narrowing
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 6

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See detailVitamin D analogs versus native vitamin D in preventing bone loss and osteoporosis-related fractures: A comparative meta-analysis
Richy, F.; Schacht, E.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2005), 76(3), 176-186

It has been suggested that early postmenopausal women and patients treated with steroids should receive preventive therapy (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin D analogs, estrogens, or bisphosphonates) to ... [more ▼]

It has been suggested that early postmenopausal women and patients treated with steroids should receive preventive therapy (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin D analogs, estrogens, or bisphosphonates) to preserve their bone mineral density (BMD) and to avoid fragility fractures. We designed the present study to compare the effects of native vitamin D to its hydroxylated analogs alfacalcidol 1-alpha(OH)D and calcitriol 1,25(OH)(2)D. All randomized, controlled, double-blinded trials comparing oral native vitamin D and its analogs, alfacalcidol or calcitriol, to placebo or head-to-head trials in primary or corticosteroids-induced osteoporosis were included in the meta-analysis. Sources included the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and a hand search of abstracts and references lists. The study period January 1985 to January 2003. Data were abstracted by two investigators, and methodological quality was assessed in a similar manner. Heterogeneity was extensively investigated. Results were expressed as effect-size (ES) for bone loss and as rate difference (RD) for fracture while allocated to active treatment or control. Publication bias was investigated. Fourteen studies of native vitamin D, nine of alfacalcidol, and ten of calcitriol fit the inclusion criteria. The two vitamin D analogs appeared to exert a higher preventive effect on bone loss and fracture rates in patients not exposed to glucocorticoids. With respect to BMD, vitamin D analogs versus placebo studies had an ES of 0.36 (P < 0.0001), whereas native vitamin D versus placebo had an ES of 0.17 (P = 0.0005), the interclass difference being highly significant (ANOVA-1, P < 0.05). When restricted to the lumbar spine, this intertreatment difference remained significant: ES = 0.43 (P = 0.0002) for vitamin D analogs and ES = 0.21 (P = 0.001) for native vitamin D (analysis of variance [ANOVA-1], P = 0.047). There were no significant differences regarding their efficacies on other measurement sites (ANOVA-1, P = 0.36). When comparing the adjusted global relative risks for fracture when allocated to vitamin D analogs or native vitamin D, alfacalcidol and calcitriol provided a more marked preventive efficacy against fractures: RD = 10% (95% Confidence interval [CI-2] to 17) compared to RD = 2% (95% CI, 1 to 2), respectively. The analysis of the spinal and nonspinal showed that fracture rates differed between the two classes, thereby confirming the benefits of vitamin D analogs, with significant 13.4% (95% CI 7.7 to 19.8) and. 6% (95% CI 1 to 12) lower fracture rates for vitamin D analogs, respectively. In patients receiving corticosteroid therapy, both treatments provided similar global ESs for BMD: ES = 0.38 for vitamin D analogs and ES = 0.41 for native vitamin D (ANOVA-1, P = 0.88). When restriced to spinal BMD, D analogs provided significant effects, whereas native vitamin D did not: ES = 0.43 (P < 0.0001) and ES = 0.33 (P = 0.21), respectively. The intertreatment difference was nonsignificant (ANOVA-1, P = 0.52). Neither D analogs for native vitamin D significantly prevented fractures in this subcategory of patients: RD = 2.6 (95%CI, -9.5 to 4.3) and RD = 6.4 (95%CI, -2.3 to 10), respectively. In head-to-head studies comparing D analogs and native vitamin D in patients receiving corticosteroids, significant effects favoring D analogs were found for femoral neck BMD: ES = 0.31 at P = 0.02 and spinal fractures: RD = 15% (95%CI, 6.5 to 25). Publication bias was not significant. Our analysis demonstrates a superiority of the D analogs atfacalcidol and calcitriol in preventing bone loss and spinal fractures in primary osteoporosis, including postmenopausal women. In corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, the efficacy of D analogs differed depending on the comparative approach: indirect comparisons led to nonsignificant differences, whereas direct comparison did provide significant differences. In this setting, D analogs seem to prevent spinal fractures to a greater extent than do native vitamin D, but this assumption should be confirmed on a comprehensive basis in multiarm studies including an inactive comparator. [less ▲]

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See detailControlled whole body vibration to decrease fall risk and improve health-related quality of life of nursing home residents
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Wuidart, M. A.; Di Palma, E. et al

in Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (2005), 86(2), 303-307

Objective: To investigate the effects of whole body vibration in the elderly. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Nursing home. Participants: Forty-two elderly volunteers. Interventions: Six ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate the effects of whole body vibration in the elderly. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Nursing home. Participants: Forty-two elderly volunteers. Interventions: Six-week vibration intervention plus physical therapy (PT) (n=22) or PT alone (n=20). Main Outcome Measures: We assessed gait and body balance using the Tinetti test (maximum scores of 12 for gait, 16 for body balance, 28 for global score), motor capacity using the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results: After 6 weeks, the vibration intervention group improved by a mean +/- standard deviation of 2.4 +/- 2.3 points on the gait score compared with no score change in the control group (P<.001). The intervention group improved by 3.5 +/- 2.1 points on the body balance score compared with a decrease of 03 +/- 1.2 points in the control group (P<.001). TUG test time decreased by 11.0 +/- 8.6 seconds in the treated group compared with an increase of 2.6 +/- 8.8 seconds in the control group (P<.001). The intervention group had significantly greater improvements from baseline on 8 of 9 items on the SF-36 compared with the control group. Conclusions: Controlled whole body vibration can improve elements of fall risk and HRQOL in elderly patients. [less ▲]

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See detailTotal joint replacement of hip or knee as an outcome measure for structure modifying trials in osteoarthritis
Altman, R. D.; Abadie, Eric ULg; Avouac, B. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2005), 13(1), 13-19

Objective: The Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES) organized a working group to assess the value of time to joint surgery as a potential therapeutic failure outcome criterion ... [more ▼]

Objective: The Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES) organized a working group to assess the value of time to joint surgery as a potential therapeutic failure outcome criterion for osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee in the assessment of potential structure modifying agents. Methods: PubMed was searched for manuscripts from 1976 to 2004. Relevant studies were discussed at a 1-day meeting. Results: There are no accepted guidelines for 'time to' and 'indications for' joint replacement surgery. A limited number of trials have examined joint replacement surgery within the study population. Several parameters, particularly joint space narrowing (interbone distance), correlate with surgical intervention. However, at the level of the knee, none of the parameters have positive predictive value for joint replacement surgery better than 30%. In contrast, lack of significant joint space narrowing has a strong negative predictive value for joint replacement surgery (> 90%), that remains after controlling for OA pain severity. Conclusion: At this time, GREES cannot recommend time to joint surgery as a primary endpoint of failure for structure modifying trials of hip or knee OA-as the parameter has sensitivity but lacks specificity. In contrast, in existing trials, a lack of progression of joint space narrowing has predictive value of > 90% for not having surgery. GREES suggests utilizing joint space narrowing (e.g., > 0.3-0.7 mm) combined with a lack of clinically relevant improvement in symptoms (e.g., greater than or equal to 20-25%) for 'failure' of a secondary outcome in structure modifying trials of the hip and knee. (C) 2004 OsteoArthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailwhat are the effects of treatments to prevent fractures in postmenopausal osteoporosis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Edwards, J.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in BMJ Clinical evidence (2005), 13

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See detailFracture prevention in postmenopausal women
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Edwards, John; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Clinical Evidence (2005), 13

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See detailClinical relevance of pain and function outcomes in glucosamine sulfate long-term trials
Giacovelli, G.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Barbetta, B. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2005), 13(A), 69

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See detailCurrent Concepts in the Therapeutic Management of Osteoarthritis with Glucosamine
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Fraikin, Genevieve et al

in Bulletin / Hospital for joint diseases (2005), 63(1-2), 31-36

Over the last 10 years, several studies have investigated the ability of glucosamine sulfate to improve the symptoms (pain and function) and to delay the structural progression of osteoarthritis. There is ... [more ▼]

Over the last 10 years, several studies have investigated the ability of glucosamine sulfate to improve the symptoms (pain and function) and to delay the structural progression of osteoarthritis. There is now a large, convergent body of evidence that glucosamine sulfate, given at a daily oral dose of 1,500 mg, is able to significantly reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the lower limbs and spine. This effect is usually seen with a minimal time for the onset of significant action - around 2 weeks. A similar dose of glucosamine sulfate has also been shown, in two independent studies, to prevent the joint space narrowing observed at the femorotibial compartment in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. This effect, which is not affected by the radiographic technique used for the assessment of joint space width, also translated into a 50% reduction in the incidence of osteoarthritis-related surgery of the lower limbs during a 5-year period following the withdrawal of the treatment. There is a high degree of consistency in the literature showing that when glucosamine sulfate is used for the treatment of osteoarthritis, an efficacious response with minimum side effects can be expected. Since some discrepancies have been described between the results of studies performed with a patent-protected formulation of glucosamine sulfate distributed as a drug and those having used glucosamine preparations purchased from global suppliers, packaged, and sold over-the-counter as nutritional supplements (not regulated as drugs and with some potential issues concerning the reliability of their content), caution should be used when extrapolating conclusive results obtained with prescription drugs to over-the-counter or food supplements. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine sulphate in osteoarthritis: from symptoms to structure modification
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; LECART, Marie-Paule ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Anti-Inflammatory & Anti-Allergy Agents in Medicinal Chemistry (2005), 4

Several chemical entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of osteoarthritis. The most compelling evidence of a potential for inhibiting the structural ... [more ▼]

Several chemical entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of osteoarthritis. The most compelling evidence of a potential for inhibiting the structural progression of osteoarthritis has been obtained with glucosamine sulfate. At any rate, this compoind has clearly demonstrated a symptomatic action, mainly in osteoarthritis of the lower limbs, on pain relief an improvement of functional disability. An important issue is that all the conclusive studies with such chyemical entities resulted from the use of prescription medicines and not over-the-counter pills of food supplements. [less ▲]

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See detailCombination/Sequential Therapy in Osteoporosis
Lecart, Marie-Paule; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Current Osteoporosis Reports (2004), 2(4), 123-30

Combination therapy includes the concomitant or sequential use of compounds sharing the same mode of action (eg, two or more inhibitors of bone resorption) or with distinct pathways of activity (eg, an ... [more ▼]

Combination therapy includes the concomitant or sequential use of compounds sharing the same mode of action (eg, two or more inhibitors of bone resorption) or with distinct pathways of activity (eg, an inhibitor of resorption plus an anabolic agent). Combination use of antiresorptive agents may generate concerns, because of the risk of inducing oversuppression of bone turnover. However, if low doses of estrogen, used for the management of climacteric symptoms, are insufficient to normalize bone turnover, the addition of a bisphosphonate to hormone therapy may prove to be useful to achieve this objective. Patients pretreated with inhibitors of resorption, who have not achieved a full therapeutic response, are good candidates for treatment with anabolic agents. The increase in bone turnover that comes after the introduction of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in patients treated with an antiresorptive agent is similar to that observed in treatment-naive patients and the pattern of bone mineral density (BMD) increase is also identical, with the exception of a 6 month delay in the spine and hip BMD changes observed in prior alendronate-treated subjects. Current data discourage the concomitant use of alendronate and PTH since the bisphosphonate appears to blunt (in men and women) the anabolic action of PTH. Whether this applies to other bisphosphonates or inhibitors of resorption, remains unknown. The use of an inhibitor of bone resorption after completion of PTH treatment seems an appropriate way to maintain the skeletal benefits gained during therapy. Long-term clinical studies, using fractures as an endpoint should be initiated to better understand the clinical and pharmaco-economic interest of combination therapies in the management of osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailPrimary prevention of osteoporosis: Mass screening scenario or prescreening with questionnaires? An economic perspective
Richy, F.; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2004), 19(12), 1955-1960

This study focuses on the controversy surrounding selective approaches to screen for osteoporosis. Seven screening approaches were compared in terms of cost-effectiveness and incremental cost ... [more ▼]

This study focuses on the controversy surrounding selective approaches to screen for osteoporosis. Seven screening approaches were compared in terms of cost-effectiveness and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in a sample of 4035 postmenopausal women. Our results show that certain prescreening strategies are more efficient than DXA-based approaches. These results are of considerable value for health policy decision-makers and the scientific community. [less ▲]

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