References of "Bruyère, Olivier"
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See detailPrévalence de la sarcopénie : impact de l'utilisation de différentes valeurs seuils de diagnostic
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Slomian, Justine ULg et al

in Cahiers de l'Année Gérontologique (Les) (2014), 6(Suppl. 1), 126

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See detailPrevalence of vitamin D inadequacy in European women aged over 80 years
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Slomian, Justine ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25(2), 196

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See detailLes chutes de la personne âgée
GILLAIN, Sophie ULg; ELBOUZ, Leila ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(5-6), 258-264

Falls are frequent in the elderly; they can have severe consequences, and sometimes reveal some underlying pathology. They represent a real public health problem which prompts numerous teams to search for ... [more ▼]

Falls are frequent in the elderly; they can have severe consequences, and sometimes reveal some underlying pathology. They represent a real public health problem which prompts numerous teams to search for adequate preventative measures, adapted therapeutic options, and means to reduce the various resulting costs. This paper describes the multidisciplinary hospital day service organized, by the CHU of Liege, for older patients who fall, or are at risk of falling. [less ▲]

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See detailReturn-to-play criteria after hamstring injury: Actual medicine practice in professional soccer teams
Delvaux, François ULg; Rochcongar, p; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Journal of Sports Science & Medicine (2014), 13

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See detailPatient engagement in clinical research through mobile technology
LoPresti, Melissa; Appelboom, Geoff; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Clinical Practice (2014), 11(6), 549-51

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See detailValidity and Reliability of the French Version of the STarT Back Screening Tool for Patients With Low Back Pain.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Demoulin, Maryline; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Spine (2014), 39(2), 123-128

Study Design. Observational prospective study.Objective. Our objective was to assess the reliability and validity of the French version of the Keele STarT Back Screening Tool (SBST).Summary of Background ... [more ▼]

Study Design. Observational prospective study.Objective. Our objective was to assess the reliability and validity of the French version of the Keele STarT Back Screening Tool (SBST).Summary of Background Data. The SBST is a recently validated tool developed to identify subgroups of patients with low back pain (LBP) to guide early secondary prevention in primary care.Methods. Outpatients with LBP aged 18 years or more, attending a rehabilitation centre, a back school, a private physiotherapy unit or a fitness centre were included. Patients were assessed through the SBST, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire (OMPSQ), Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire, and a pain visual analogic scale (VAS). Test-retest reliability was assessed with Kappa score or the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), internal consistency of the psychological subscale with the Cronbach alpha coefficient, construct validity with the Spearman's correlation coefficient, and floor and ceiling effects by percentage frequency of lowest or highest possible score achieved by respondents.Results. 108 patients with LBP were included. The test-retest reliability of the SBST total score was excellent with an ICC of 0.90 (0.81-0.95). The Cronbach alpha coefficient was 0.73 showing a good internal consistency for the psychological subscale. High Spearman's correlation coefficients of 0.74 between SBST and RMDQ, and 0.74 between the SBST and OMPSQ were observed. As expected, low to moderate correlations were observed between the SBST total score and some dissimilar measures of the SF-36. The lowest possible SBST score was observed for 8 patients (7.4%) whereas only three patients (2.8%) had the highest possible SBST score.Conclusion. The French version of the SBST is a reliable and valid questionnaire consistent with the original English version. Therefore, this new version may help French-speaking clinicians and scientists to stratify patients with LBP. [less ▲]

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See detailEconomic evaluation of an osteoporosis screening campaign: using FRAX as a prescreening tool
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Ben Sedrine, Wafa ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25(2), 38-39

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See detailEvaluation of the impact of 6-month training by whole body vibration on the risk of falls among nursing home residents, observed over a 12-month period: a single blind, randomized controlled trial.
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Maquet, Didier ULg et al

in Aging Clinical & Experimental Research (2014), 26(4), 369-376

BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that short sessions of whole body vibration (WBV) were not able to significantly improve fall risk among nursing home residents but some trends towards an improvement ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that short sessions of whole body vibration (WBV) were not able to significantly improve fall risk among nursing home residents but some trends towards an improvement of motor capacity were observed. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of 6-month training by WBV on functional and motor abilities among nursing home residents observed over a 12-month period. METHODS: Patients were randomized into two groups: the WBV group which received three training sessions every week composed of five series of 15 s of vibration at 30 Hz intensity for a period of 6 months and a control group with normal daily life. The impact of this training on the risk of falls was assessed blindly after 6 and 12 months by the Tinetti Test, the "Timed Up and Go" test and a quantitative evaluation of a 10-s walk performed with a tri-axial accelerometer. The occurrence of falls was also observed. RESULTS: 62 elderly healthy volunteers, (47 women and 15 men, mean age 83.2 +/- 7.9 years) were included in this study. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the Tinetti test (p = 0.75), the "Timed Up and Go" test (p = 0.19) and the Locometrix(R) test, except for the step length, measured by dual task (p < 0.01). No significant inter-group difference in the frequency of falls was observed during the 12 months of research. A total of 42 falls were recorded during the first 6 months of experimentation: 24 falls in the treated group and 18 in the control group (p = 0.60). During the next 6 months, 19 falls occurred: 8 falls in the treated group and 11 in the control group (p = 0.52). CONCLUSION: This study failed to establish the effectiveness of low doses of WBV, under the conditions used in our study, on functional and motor abilities of institutionalized elderly patients. However, given the positive results of other studies, further investigations, with modified therapeutic protocols, seem necessary to clarify the effects of WBV in the elderly. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical and biological determinants of sclerostin plasma concentration in hemodialysis patients
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; KRZESINSKI, Jean-Marie ULg; Warling, Xavier et al

in Nephron. Clinical Practice (2014), 128

Background: Sclerostin is a potent inhibitor of bone formation, but the meaning of its serum levels remains undetermined. We evaluated the association between sclerostin levels and clinical or biological ... [more ▼]

Background: Sclerostin is a potent inhibitor of bone formation, but the meaning of its serum levels remains undetermined. We evaluated the association between sclerostin levels and clinical or biological data in hemodialyzed patients (HD), notably parathormone (PTH), biomarkers of bone turnover, vascular calcifications and mortality after 2 years. Methods: 164 HD patients were included in this observational study. The calcification score was assessed with the Kauppila method. Patients were followed for 2 years. Results: Median sclerostin levels were significantly (p < 0.0001) higher in HD versus healthy subjects (n = 94) (1,375 vs. 565 pg/ml, respectively). In univariate analysis a significant association (p < 0.05) was found between sclerostin and age, height, dialysis vintage, albumin, troponin, homocysteine, PTH, C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and osteoprotegerin, but not with the calcification score. In a multivariate model, the association remained with age, height, dialysis vintage, troponin, homocysteine, phosphate, PTH, but also with vascular calcifications. Association was positive for all variables, except PTH and vascular calcifications. The baseline sclerostin concentration was not different in survivors and non-survivors. Conclusions: We confirm a higher concentration of sclerostin in HD patients, a positive association with age and a negative association with PTH. A positive association with phosphate, homocysteine and troponin calls for additional research. The clinical interest of sclerostin to assess vascular calcifications in HD is limited and no association was found between sclerostin and mortality. [less ▲]

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See detailSarcopenia: burden and challenges for public health
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Rizzoli, R; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Archives of Public Health (2014), 72

Sarcopenia, operationally defined as the loss of muscle mass and muscle function, is a major health condition associated with ageing, and contributes to many components of public health at both the ... [more ▼]

Sarcopenia, operationally defined as the loss of muscle mass and muscle function, is a major health condition associated with ageing, and contributes to many components of public health at both the patient and the societal levels. Currently, no consensual definition of sarcopenia exists and therefore it is still a challenge to establish the actual prevalence of sarcopenia or to establish the direct and indirect impacts of sarcopenia on public health. Anyway, this geriatric syndrome represents a huge potential public health issue because of its multiple clinical and societal consequences. Moreover, all these aspects have an impact on healthcare costs both for the patient and the society. Therefore, the implementation of effective and broadly applicable preventive and therapeutic interventions has become a medical and societal challenge for the growing number of older persons affected by sarcopenia and its disabling complications. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of sarcopenia: the impact of different diagnostic cut-off limits.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Slomian, Justine ULg et al

in Journal of musculoskeletal & neuronal interactions (2014), 14(4), 425-31

INTRODUCTION: In the definition of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), different cut-off limits are proposed for appendicular lean mass, muscle strength and gait speed ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: In the definition of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), different cut-off limits are proposed for appendicular lean mass, muscle strength and gait speed. Therefore we aimed to examine the variation in prevalence of sarcopenia obtained with these cut-off limits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Subjects aged 65 years and older were recruited in an outpatient clinic in Belgium and screened for sarcopenia using the EWGSOP definition. Appendicular lean mass was measured by Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry, muscle strength by a hydraulic handgrip dynamometer and gait speed was measured on a 4-meter distance. Two different cut-off points proposed by the EWGSOP were examined for each variable and 8 diagnostic methods were thereby established. RESULTS: 400 subjects were recruited for this study. Prevalence of sarcopenia varied from 9.25% to 18% depending on the cut-offs applied. When stratified by sex, it seems that the variation in prevalence of sarcopenia was mainly attributable to women. This prevalence ranged from 6.58% to 20.2% for women and only from 13.4% to 14.7% for men. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of sarcopenia varies widely depending on the EWGSOP cut-off points applied for women. This may limit clinical researches and development of therapeutic strategies in the field of sarcopenia. [less ▲]

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See detailA reference case for economic evaluations in osteoarthritis: An expert consensus article from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO).
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Cooper, Cyrus; Guillemin, Francis et al

in Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism (2014), 44

BACKGROUND: General recommendations for a reference case for economic studies in rheumatic diseases were published in 2002 in an initiative to improve the comparability of cost-effectiveness studies in ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: General recommendations for a reference case for economic studies in rheumatic diseases were published in 2002 in an initiative to improve the comparability of cost-effectiveness studies in the field. Since then, economic evaluations in osteoarthritis (OA) continue to show considerable heterogeneity in methodological approach. OBJECTIVES: To develop a reference case specific for economic studies in OA, including the standard optimal care, with which to judge new pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions. METHODS: Four subgroups of an ESCEO expert working group on economic assessments (13 experts representing diverse aspects of clinical research and/or economic evaluations) were charged with producing lists of recommendations that would potentially improve the comparability of economic analyses in OA: outcome measures, comparators, costs and methodology. These proposals were discussed and refined during a face-to-face meeting in 2013. They are presented here in the format of the recommendations of the recently published Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) statement, so that an initiative on economic analysis methodology might be consolidated with an initiative on reporting standards. RESULTS: Overall, three distinct reference cases are proposed, one for each hand, knee and hip OA; with diagnostic variations in the first two, giving rise to different treatment options: interphalangeal or thumb-based disease for hand OA and the presence or absence of joint malalignment for knee OA. A set of management strategies is proposed, which should be further evaluated to help establish a consensus on the "standard optimal care" in each proposed reference case. The recommendations on outcome measures, cost itemisation and methodological approaches are also provided. CONCLUSIONS: The ESCEO group proposes a set of disease-specific recommendations on the conduct and reporting of economic evaluations in OA that could help the standardisation and comparability of studies that evaluate therapeutic strategies of OA in terms of costs and effectiveness. [less ▲]

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See detailAn algorithm recommendation for the management of knee osteoarthritis in Europe and internationally: A report from a task force of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO)
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, C; Pelletier, JP et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2014), 44

Objectives: Existing practice guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) analyze the evidence behind each proposed treatment but do not prioritize the interventions in a given sequence. The objective was to ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Existing practice guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) analyze the evidence behind each proposed treatment but do not prioritize the interventions in a given sequence. The objective was to develop a treatment algorithm recommendation that is easier to interpret for the prescribing physician based on the available evidence and that is applicable in Europe and internationally. The knee was used as the model OA joint. Methods: ESCEO assembled a task force of 13 international experts (rheumatologists, clinical epidemiologists, and clinical scientists). Existing guidelines were reviewed; all interventions listed and recent evidence were retrieved using established databases. A first schematic flow chart with treatment prioritization was discussed in a 1-day meeting and shaped to the treatment algorithm. Fine-tuning occurred by electronic communication and three consultation rounds until consensus. Results: Basic principles consist of the need for a combined pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment with a core set of initial measures, including information access/education, weight loss if overweight, and an appropriate exercise program. Four multimodal steps are then established. Step 1 consists of background therapy, either non-pharmacological (referral to a physical therapist for re-alignment treatment if needed and sequential introduction of further physical interventions initially and at any time thereafter) or pharmacological. The latter consists of chronic Symptomatic Slow-Acting Drugs for OA (e.g., prescription glucosamine sulfate and/or chondroitin sulfate) with paracetamol at-need; topical NSAIDs are added in the still symptomatic patient. Step 2 consists of the advanced pharmacological management in the persistent symptomatic patient and is centered on the use of oral COX-2 selective or non-selective NSAIDs, chosen based on concomitant risk factors, with intra-articular corticosteroids or hyaluronate for further symptom relief if insufficient. In Step 3, the last pharmacological attempts before surgery are represented by weak opioids and other central analgesics. Finally, Step 4 consists of end-stage disease management and surgery, with classical opioids as a difficult-to-manage alternative when surgery is contraindicated. Conclusions: The proposed treatment algorithm may represent a new framework for the development of future guidelines for the management of OA, more easily accessible to physicians. © 2014 The Authors. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of currently marketed anti-osteoporosis medications
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; NEUPREZ, Audrey ULg; Dardenne, Nadia ULg et al

in Best Practice & Research. Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (2014), 28

During the past 2 decades, many interventions were proven effective in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The objective of an anti-osteoporosis treatment is to reduce fracture rates, ideally ... [more ▼]

During the past 2 decades, many interventions were proven effective in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The objective of an anti-osteoporosis treatment is to reduce fracture rates, ideally at all skeletal sites (i.e. spine, hip, and other non-spine). The armamentarium against osteoporosis includes anti-resorptive agents (i.e. bisphosphonates, selective estrogen receptor modulators and denosumab), bone-forming agents (i.e. peptides from the parathyroid hormone family) and one agent with a dual mechanism of action (i.e. strontium ranelate). All these medications combine anti-fracture efficacy with a reasonable benefit/risk profile. However, the choice of a particular chemical entity, in one individual patient is based on the knowledge and expertise of the physician. Prioritization of drugs should be based on the individual profile of the patient, the severity of osteoporosis and the specific contraindications, warnings and precautions of use of the various available medications. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of vitamin D on skeletal muscle strength, muscle mass and muscle power: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Rabenda, Véronique ULg et al

in The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism (2014), 99(11), 4336-4345

Context There is growing evidence that vitamin D plays a role on several tissues including skeletal muscle. Objective To summarize with a meta-analyse the effects of vitamin D supplementation on muscle ... [more ▼]

Context There is growing evidence that vitamin D plays a role on several tissues including skeletal muscle. Objective To summarize with a meta-analyse the effects of vitamin D supplementation on muscle function. Data sources A systematic research of randomized controlled trials, performed between 1966 and January 2014 has been conducted on Medline, Cochrane Database of Systematics Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled and completed by a manual review of the literature and congressional abstracts. Study selection All forms and doses of vitamin D supplementation, with or without calcium supplementation, compared with placebo or control were included. Out of the 225 potentially relevant articles, 30 randomized controlled trials involving 5615 individuals (mean age: 61.1 years) met the inclusion criteria. Data extraction Data were extracted by two independent reviewers. Data synthesis Results revealed a small but significant positive effect of vitamin D supplementation on global muscle strength with a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.17 (p=0.02). No significant effect was found on muscle mass (SMD 0.058; p=0.52) or muscle power (SMD 0.057; p=0.657). Results on muscle strength were significantly more important with people who presented a 25-hydroxyvitamin D level <30 nmol/L. Supplementation seems also more effective on people aged 65 years or older compared to younger subjects (SMD 0.25; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.48 versus SMD 0.03; 95% CI -0.08 to 0.14). Conclusions Vitamin D supplementation has a small positive impact on muscle strength but additional studies are needed to define optimal treatment modalities, including dose, mode of administration and duration. [less ▲]

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See detailMonitoring of osteoporosis therapy
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Best Practice & Research. Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (2014), 28

Over the past two decades, major advances have been made in the number and range of agents available for the treatment of osteoporosis, all with proven anti-fracture efficacy. Unfortunately, compliance ... [more ▼]

Over the past two decades, major advances have been made in the number and range of agents available for the treatment of osteoporosis, all with proven anti-fracture efficacy. Unfortunately, compliance with these treatments is not optimal, and a number of patients could be considered as non-responders. Consequently, monitoring anti-osteoporotic therapy could be part of successful osteoporosis management. Currently, no formal well-accepted clinical practice guidelines are available for monitoring anti-osteoporosis therapies. Changes in bone mineral density and bone turnover markers, while on therapy, have potential value in monitoring treatment but their assessment and, consequently, their benefits could be limited by metrological and clinical issues. Moreover, their effectiveness is probably drug dependant. Recommendation for the standardisation of the methodology when analysing the potential relevance of tools for the monitoring of osteoporosis therapy is needed. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociation between lean mass and hip bone mineral density
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Slomian, Justine ULg et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2014), 66(11), 95

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See detailErratum to: Management of osteoporosis of the oldest old
Rizzoli, R; Branco, J; Brandi, ML et al

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25

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See detailManagement of osteoporosis of the oldest old.
Rizzoli, R.; Branco, J.; Brandi, M.-L. et al

in Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA (2014), 25

This consensus article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in geriatric populations. Specifically, it reviews the risk assessment and intervention thresholds, the impact of nutritional ... [more ▼]

This consensus article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in geriatric populations. Specifically, it reviews the risk assessment and intervention thresholds, the impact of nutritional deficiencies, fall prevention strategies, pharmacological treatments and their safety considerations, the risks of sub-optimal treatment adherence and strategies for its improvement. INTRODUCTION: This consensus article reviews the therapeutic strategies and management options for the treatment of osteoporosis of the oldest old. This vulnerable segment (persons over 80 years of age) stands to gain substantially from effective anti-osteoporosis treatment, but the under-prescription of these treatments is frequent. METHODS: This report is the result of an ESCEO (European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis) expert working group, which explores some of the reasons for this and presents the arguments to counter these beliefs. The risk assessment of older individuals is briefly reviewed along with the differences between some intervention guidelines. The current evidence on the impact of nutritional deficiencies (i.e. calcium, protein and vitamin D) is presented, as are strategies to prevent falls. One possible reason for the under-prescription of pharmacological treatments for osteoporosis in the oldest old is the perception that anti-fracture efficacy requires long-term treatment. However, a review of the data shows convincing anti-fracture efficacy already by 12 months. RESULTS: The safety profiles of these pharmacological agents are generally satisfactory in this patient segment provided a few precautions are followed. CONCLUSION: These patients should be considered for particular consultation/follow-up procedures in the effort to convince on the benefits of treatment and to allay fears of adverse drug reactions, since poor adherence is a major problem for the success of a strategy for osteoporosis and limits cost-effectiveness. [less ▲]

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