References of "Bruyère, Olivier"
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See detailAlgofunctional status in Belgian women one year after completion of therapy for breast cancer
DESSALLE, Marguerite ULg; MICHALET, A; BOURSE, Julie ULg et al

in Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (2013), 56S

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See detailHealth economics in the field of osteoarthritis: An Expert's consensus paper from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO).
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Cooper, Cyrus; Arden, Nigel et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2013), 43(3), 303-313

OBJECTIVES: There is an important need to evaluate therapeutic approaches for osteoarthritis (OA) in terms of cost-effectiveness as well as efficacy. METHODS: The ESCEO expert working group met to discuss ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: There is an important need to evaluate therapeutic approaches for osteoarthritis (OA) in terms of cost-effectiveness as well as efficacy. METHODS: The ESCEO expert working group met to discuss the epidemiological and economic evidence that justifies the increasing concern of the impact of this disease and reviewed the current state-of-the-art in health economic studies in this field. RESULTS: OA is a debilitating disease; it is increasing in frequency and is associated with a substantial and growing burden on society, in terms of both burden of illness and cost of illness. Economic evaluations in this field are relatively rare, and those that do exist, show considerable heterogeneity of methodological approach (such as indicated population, comparator, decision context and perspective, time horizon, modeling and outcome measures used). This heterogeneity makes comparisons between studies problematic. CONCLUSIONS: Better adherence to guidelines for economic evaluations is needed. There was strong support for the definition of a reference case and for what might constitute "standard optimal care" in terms of best clinical practice, for the control arms of interventional studies. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in Structure and Symptoms in Knee Osteoarthritis and Prediction of Future Knee Replacement Over 8 Years.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, Cyrus; Pavelka, Karel et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2013), 93

The objective of this study was to assess the association between changes in joint space width (JSW, i.e., structure) or Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) score (i.e., symptoms) over 3 ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to assess the association between changes in joint space width (JSW, i.e., structure) or Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) score (i.e., symptoms) over 3 years in patients with knee osteoarthritis and the occurrence of knee replacement over 8 years. We followed 133 subjects with primary knee osteoarthritis prospectively for a mean of 8 years. JSW (standard radiography) and symptoms (total WOMAC score) were assessed every year for 3 years. The rate of knee replacement was recorded for the following 5 years. Logistic regressions were performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. After 8 years' follow-up, ten patients (7.5 %) had undergone a knee replacement. The changes in JSW or WOMAC score over 3 years were significantly associated with the occurrence of knee replacement during the following 5 years (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). Each 0.1-mm narrowing of JSW over 3 years was associated with a 14 % (95 % CI 3-25 %) increased risk for knee replacement. For every 10 % increase in WOMAC score, the risk for joint replacement was increased by 16 % (95 % CI 1-33 %). When JSW and WOMAC score were included in the same statistical model, they were still significantly associated with risk for knee replacement (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively), but JSW change was the only variable that remained significant after adjusting for all potential confounders. Our results suggest that changes in symptoms and, more particularly, in structure over 3 years in patients with osteoarthritis reflect a clinically relevant progression of the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailDéveloppement et validation de la version française d'un questionnaire traitant des attentes des patients dans l'arthrose des membres inférieurs
NEUPREZ, Audrey ULg; Delcour, JP; Fatemi, F et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2013), 80(S1), 181

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See detailLe ranélate de strontium diminue la proportion de patients progressant rapidement dès la première année : une analyse post hoc de l'étude SEKOIA
Chevalier, X; Richette, P; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2013), 80(S1), 59-60

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See detailPrevalence of vitamin D inadequacy in European postmenopausal women aged over 80 years
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Slomian, Justine ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in European Geriatric Medicine (2013), 4(S1), 13-14

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See detailStrontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: new insights and emerging clinical evidence.
REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Neuprez, Audrey et al

in Therapeutic advances in musculoskeletal disease (2013), 5(5), 268-276

Osteoarthritis is a primary cause of disability and functional incapacity. Pharmacological treatment is currently limited to symptomatic management, and in advanced stages, surgery remains the only ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis is a primary cause of disability and functional incapacity. Pharmacological treatment is currently limited to symptomatic management, and in advanced stages, surgery remains the only solution. The therapeutic armamentarium for osteoarthritis remains poor in treatments with an effect on joint structure, that is, disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). Glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate are the only medications for which some conclusive evidence for a disease-modifying effect is available. Strontium ranelate is currently indicated for the prevention of fracture in severe osteoporosis. Its efficacy and safety as a DMOAD in knee osteoarthritis has recently been explored in the SEKOIA trial, a 3-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Outpatients with knee osteoarthritis, Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or 3, and joint space width (JSW) of 2.5-5 mm received strontium ranelate 1 g/day (n = 558) or 2 g/day (n = 566), or placebo (n = 559). This sizable population was aged 62.9 years and had a JSW of 3.50 +/- 0.84 mm. Treatment with strontium ranelate led to significantly less progression of knee osteoarthritis: estimates for annual difference in joint space narrowing versus placebo were 0.14 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05-0.23 mm; p < 0.001] for 1 g/day and 0.10 mm (95% CI 0.02-0.19 mm; p = 0.018) for 2 g/day, with no difference between strontium ranelate groups. Radiological progression was less frequent with strontium ranelate (22% with 1 g/day and 26% with 2 g/day versus 33% with placebo, both p < 0.05), as was radioclinical progression (8% and 7% versus 12%, both p < 0.05). Symptoms also improved with strontium ranelate 2 g/day only in terms of total WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) score (p = 0.045), and its components for pain (p = 0.028) and physical function (p = 0.099). Responder analyses using a range of criteria for symptoms indicated that the effect of strontium ranelate 2 g/day on pain and physical function was clinically meaningful. Strontium ranelate was well tolerated. The observation of both structure and symptom modification with strontium ranelate 2 g/day makes SEKOIA a milestone in osteoarthritis research and treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat is the predictive value of MRI for the occurrence of knee replacement surgery in knee osteoarthritis?
Pelletier, J.-P.; Cooper, C.; Peterfy, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72(10), 1594-1604

Knee osteoarthritis is associated with structural changes in the joint. Despite its many drawbacks, radiography is the current standard for evaluating joint structure in trials of potential disease ... [more ▼]

Knee osteoarthritis is associated with structural changes in the joint. Despite its many drawbacks, radiography is the current standard for evaluating joint structure in trials of potential disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs. MRI is a non-invasive alternative that provides comprehensive imaging of the whole joint. Frequently used MRI measurements in knee osteoarthritis are cartilage volume and thickness; others include synovitis, synovial fluid effusions, bone marrow lesions (BML) and meniscal damage. Joint replacement is considered a clinically relevant outcome in knee osteoarthritis; however, its utility in clinical trials is limited. An alternative is virtual knee replacement on the basis of symptoms and structural damage. MRI may prove to be a good alternative to radiography in definitions of knee replacement. One of the MRI parameters that predicts knee replacement is medial compartment cartilage volume/thickness, which correlates with radiographic joint space width, is sensitive to change, and predicts outcomes in a continuous manner. Other MRI parameters include BML and meniscal lesions. MRI appears to be a viable alternative to radiography for the evaluation of structural changes in knee osteoarthritis and prediction of joint replacement. [less ▲]

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See detailValue of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives.
Lotz, M.; Martel-Pelletier, J.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint remodelling and disease progression. This article was prepared following a working meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis convened to discuss the value of biochemical markers of matrix metabolism in drug development in osteoarthritis. The best candidates are generally molecules or molecular fragments present in cartilage, bone or synovium and may be specific to one type of joint tissue or common to them all. Many currently investigated biomarkers are associated with collagen metabolism in cartilage or bone, or aggrecan metabolism in cartilage. Other biomarkers are related to non-collagenous proteins, inflammation and/or fibrosis. Biomarkers in osteoarthritis can be categorised using the burden of disease, investigative, prognostic, efficacy of intervention, diagnostic and safety classification. There are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein, although none is sufficiently discriminating to differentiate between individual patients and controls (diagnostic) or between patients with different disease severities (burden of disease), predict prognosis in individuals with or without osteoarthritis (prognostic) or perform so consistently that it could function as a surrogate outcome in clinical trials (efficacy of intervention). Future avenues for research include exploration of underlying mechanisms of disease and development of new biomarkers; technological development; the 'omics' (genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and lipidomics); design of aggregate scores combining a panel of biomarkers and/or imaging markers into single diagnostic algorithms; and investigation into the relationship between biomarkers and prognosis. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat do we know about the safety of corticosteroids in rheumatoid arthritis?
Ethgen, Olivier ULg; De Lemos Esteves, Frédéric ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2013), 29(9), 1147-60

Abstract Background: Clear information is still lacking on the safety of corticosteroids (GCs) therapy in RA despite six decades of clinical experience. Scope: We performed a literature search in Ovid ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: Clear information is still lacking on the safety of corticosteroids (GCs) therapy in RA despite six decades of clinical experience. Scope: We performed a literature search in Ovid MEDLINE from January 2000 to December 2012. Our Population Intervention Comparator Outcomes (PICO) strategy search was: rheumatoid arthritis [Population], corticosteroids or glucocorticoids [Intervention], any comparison [Comparator], adverse effects [Outcome]. Studies were selected if they reported any measure of association between GCs intake and potential adverse effects in RA patients. Findings: We identified 1030 papers and selected for analysis 26 observational studies and six systematic reviews. The major side effects of GCs in RA are bone loss, risk of cardiovascular events and risk of infections as evidenced by large observational studies and not necessarily RCTs. Others associations were reported with herpes zoster, tuberculosis, hyperglycemia, cutaneous abnormalities, gastrointestinal perforation, respiratory infection and self-reported health problems such as cushingoid phenotype, ecchymosis, parchment-like skin, epistaxis, weight gain and sleep disturbance. Other potential adverse effects of GCs were studied but no association was found. These included psychological disorders, dermatophytosis, brain diseases, interstitial lung disease, memory deficit, metabolic syndrome, lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, renal function and cerebrovascular accidents. Most of the evidence emanates from observational researches and the inherent limitations of such data should be kept in mind. Conclusion: Recent observational data and systematic reviews suggest that GCs can lead to relatively alarming and burdensome side effects in RA. This is particularly true for patients who have longer term and higher dose therapies. GCs are largely used in RA and knowing their safety profile is essential to improve patients care. The design of new therapeutic strategies intended to minimize the daily dosing of GCs while conserving their beneficial effect should be encouraged. [less ▲]

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See detailVitamin D supplementation in elderly or postmenopausal women: a 2013 update of the 2008 recommendations from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO).
Rizzoli, R.; Boonen, S.; Brandi, M.-L. et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2013), 29(4), 305-13

Abstract Background: Vitamin D insufficiency has deleterious consequences on health outcomes. In elderly or postmenopausal women, it may exacerbate osteoporosis. Scope: There is currently no clear ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: Vitamin D insufficiency has deleterious consequences on health outcomes. In elderly or postmenopausal women, it may exacerbate osteoporosis. Scope: There is currently no clear consensus on definitions of vitamin D insufficiency or minimal targets for vitamin D concentrations and proposed targets vary with the population. In view of the potential confusion for practitioners on when to treat and what to achieve, the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) convened a meeting to provide recommendations for clinical practice, to ensure the optimal management of elderly and postmenopausal women with regard to vitamin D supplementation. Findings: Vitamin D has both skeletal and extra-skeletal benefits. Patients with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH)D) levels <50 nmol/L have increased bone turnover, bone loss, and possibly mineralization defects compared with patients with levels >50 nmol/L. Similar relationships have been reported for frailty, nonvertebral and hip fracture, and all-cause mortality, with poorer outcomes at <50 nmol/L. Conclusion: The ESCEO recommends that 50 nmol/L (i.e. 20 ng/mL) should be the minimal serum 25-(OH)D concentration at the population level and in patients with osteoporosis to ensure optimal bone health. Below this threshold, supplementation is recommended at 800 to 1000 IU/day. Vitamin D supplementation is safe up to 10,000 IU/day (upper limit of safety) resulting in an upper limit of adequacy of 125 nmol/L 25-(OH)D. Daily consumption of calcium- and vitamin-D-fortified food products (e.g. yoghurt or milk) can help improve vitamin D intake. Above the threshold of 50 nmol/L, there is no clear evidence for additional benefits of supplementation. On the other hand, in fragile elderly subjects who are at elevated risk for falls and fracture, the ESCEO recommends a minimal serum 25-(OH)D level of 75 nmol/L (i.e. 30 ng/mL), for the greatest impact on fracture. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of 3 months of short sessions of controlled whole body vibrations on the risk of falls among nursing home residents
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Maquet, Didier ULg; Mannarino, Mélanie et al

in BMC Geriatrics (2013), 13(42),

Background: Fatigue, lack of motivation and low compliance can be observed in nursing home residents during the practice of physical activity. Because exercises should not be too vigorous, whole body ... [more ▼]

Background: Fatigue, lack of motivation and low compliance can be observed in nursing home residents during the practice of physical activity. Because exercises should not be too vigorous, whole body vibration could potentially be an effective alternative. The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the impact of 3-month training by whole body vibration on the risk of falls among nursing home residents. Methods: Patients were randomized into two groups: the whole body vibration group which received 3 training sessions every week composed of 5 series of only 15 seconds of vibrations at 30 Hz frequency and a control group with normal daily life for the whole study period. The impact of this training on the risk of falls was assessed blindly by three tests: the Tinetti Test, the Timed Up and Go test and a quantitative evaluation of a 10-second walk performed with a tri-axial accelerometer. Results: 62 subjects (47 women and 15 men; mean age 83.2 ± 7.99 years) were recruited for the study. No significant change in the studied parameters was observed between the treated (n=31) and the control group (n=31) after 3 months of training by controlled whole-body-vibrations. Actually, the Tinetti test increased of + 0.93 ± 3.14 points in the treated group against + 0.88 ± 2.33 points in the control group (p = 0.89 when adjusted). The Timed Up and Go test showed a median evolution of - 1.14 (− 4.75-3.73) seconds in the treated group against + 0.41 (− 3.57- 2.41) seconds in the control group (p = 0.06). For the quantitative evaluation of the walk, no significant change was observed between the treated and the control group in single task as well as in dual task conditions. Conclusions: The whole body vibration training performed with the exposition settings such as those used in this research was feasible but seems to have no impact on the risk of falls among nursing home residents. Further investigations, in which, for example, the exposure parameters would be changed, seem necessary [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between use of antidepressants and risk of fractures: a meta-analysis
Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Nicolet, Delphine ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24

Summary It has been shown that antidepressants would have a direct action on bone metabolism and would be associated with increased fracture risk. Results from this large meta-analysis show that both ... [more ▼]

Summary It has been shown that antidepressants would have a direct action on bone metabolism and would be associated with increased fracture risk. Results from this large meta-analysis show that both SSRIs and TCAs are associated with a moderate and clinically significant increase in the risk of fractures of all types. Introduction This study seeks to investigate the relationship between use of antidepressants and the risk of fracture. Methods An exhaustive systematic research of case–control and cohort studies published or performed between 1966 and April 2011 that reported risk estimates of fracture associated with use of antidepressants was performed using MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Systematic Review Database, manual review of the literature, and congressional abstracts. Inclusion, quality scoring, and data abstraction were performed systematically by three independent reviewers. Results A total of 34 studies (n01,217,464 individuals) were identified. Compared with non-users, the random effects pooled RR of fractures of all types, among antidepressant users, were 1.39 (95%CI 1.32–1.47). Use of antidepressants were associated with a 42 %, 47 %, and 38 % risk increase in non-vertebral, hip, and spine fractures, respectively ([For non-vertebral fractures: RR01.42, 95%CI 1.34–1.51]; [For hip fractures: RR01.47, 95%CI 1.36–1.58]; [For spine fractures: RR01.38, 95%CI 1.19–1.61]). Studies examining SSRI use showed systematically a higher increase in the risk of fractures of all types, non-vertebral, and hip fractures than studies evaluating TCA use. Conclusions Results from this large meta-analysis show that both SSRIs and TCAs are associated with a moderate and clinically significant increase in the risk of fractures of all types. [less ▲]

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See detailIs there potential for strontium ranelate in the management of osteoarthritis ?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Pelousse, Franz; Bruyère, Olivier ULg

in Clinical Practice (2013), 10(2), 201-207

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See detailEquivalence of a single dose (1200 mg) compared to a three-time a day dose (400 mg) of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Results of a randomized double blind placebo controlled study.
Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Crozes, P.; Uebelhart, D. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2013), 21(1), 22-27

OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a single oral dose of a 1200 mg sachet of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate (CS 1200) vs three daily capsules of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate 400 mg (CS 3*400 ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a single oral dose of a 1200 mg sachet of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate (CS 1200) vs three daily capsules of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate 400 mg (CS 3*400) (equivalence study) and vs placebo (superiority study) during 3 months, in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: Comparative, double-blind, randomized, multicenter study, including 353 patients of both genders over 45 years with knee OA. Minimum inclusion criteria were a Lequesne index (LI) >/= 7 and pain >/= 40 mm on a visual analogue scale (VAS). LI and VAS were assessed at baseline and after 1-3 months. Equivalence between CS was tested using the per-protocol procedure and superiority of CS vs placebo was tested using an intent-to-treat procedure. RESULTS: After 3 months of follow-up, no significant difference was demonstrated between the oral daily single dose of CS 1200 formulation and the three daily capsules of CS 400. Patients treated with CS 1200 or CS 3*400 were significantly improved compared to placebo after 3 months of follow-up in terms of LI (<0.001) and VAS (P < 0.01). No significant difference in terms of security and tolerability was observed between the three groups. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that a daily administration of an oral sachet of 1200 mg of chondroitin 4&6 sulfate allows a significant clinical improvement compared to a placebo, and a similar improvement when compared to a regimen of three daily capsules of 400 mg of the same active ingredient. [less ▲]

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